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Dr. S.K.Goel

Veterinarian, Hyderabad

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Dr. S.K.Goel Veterinarian, Hyderabad
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. S.K.Goel
Dr. S.K.Goel is a renowned Veterinarian in Secunderabad, Hyderabad. You can consult Dr. S.K.Goel at Dr.S.K.Goel's Clinic in Secunderabad, Hyderabad. Book an appointment online with Dr. S.K.Goel on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dr.S.K.Goel's Clinic

12-7-2,Opp. Railway Hospitstal, Near Taranaka, Secunderabad, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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Hi. 5 days before my dog died Without any symptoms. In my village nearly 30 dogs died within 10 days. Can you please tell what may be the reason.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, the reason may be silent form of rabies. If one dog effected, the other dogs also may be effected. Or if any food poisoning at the same place. Check once. Or take one to nearest vet for proper diagnosis.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is 10 DAY old and he shivering at night. Can you explain why? And what precaution we should take.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Shivering at night can be due to cold or fear. How is the overall condition of your pet. If your pet is otherwise healthy check pls keep him in warm enough.
1 person found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

My dog is having high fever with blood in motion and also vomiting since 1 day. He is 3 months old. Please tell me what to do? please

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
May be of parvo diarrhoea . please investigate about vaccination history and also treat with a vet with fluids for at least 5 days
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If a dog get fractured in his back. He is in great pain, even painkillers are not working. How many chances he have for survive?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Please possible put same x rays of fracture so according to that we can decided what we can do. Till that cond painkiller and antibiotic.
8 people found this helpful
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I have a female dog. She is 12 years old .now color of her teeth is changing. Tartar built on her teeth .I just wanted to know how to take care of her teeth?

Diploma in Diabetology, Pregnancy & Diabetes, Hypertension, Cardiovascular Prevention in Diabetes ,Thyroid
Sexologist, Sri Ganganagar
It can leadto gum cavities and disease. Better consult some vetenary doctor so that you dog may not get teeth damage. Certain pyrophosphates help to decrease new crystals of tartar from forming.
1 person found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Your dog?s health is a key to a long and happy companionship. To keep it healthy in long run, it is important to know how your pet?s body work ? in health and disease! Being aware of certain basics helps you to prevent many problems, and pick up the major problems early in its course. In order to react quickly and help your pet?s ailments in timely manner you must be able to spot signs and relate them to specific systems, so as to understand gravity of it and seek Veterinarian?s advice sooner.
16 people found this helpful

I have a dog when he gets to sleep he used to take continuous loud breathing while asleep. What could be the possible reason of this thing?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your dog possibly has short nose. May be a pug, boxer or a bulldog. Its called boas. Brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome. If not, then its just called snoring. Due to heavy day activities or overweight or both.
1 person found this helpful
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5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

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