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Dr. Rama Rao

Veterinarian, Hyderabad

Dr. Rama Rao Veterinarian, Hyderabad
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Rama Rao
Dr. Rama Rao is a renowned Veterinarian in Adibatla, Hyderabad. She is currently practising at Dog Hospital in Adibatla, Hyderabad. Book an appointment online with Dr. Rama Rao on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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My dog snoop is very sick I think. His eyes are red. Always red. He is fine in the morning but after 4.20 he acts crazy. I don't know what to do.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
It might be seems some allergies which normally cause eyes red. You can use any antiallergic drug like cetirizine. You should share some pic. Of your pet before you should start using any drug?
2 people found this helpful
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My dog suffering from skin disease for last onemonth.We have done pus culture it was found Moderate-STAPHYLOCOCCUS INTERMRDIUS and sensitive to most of antibiotics.The doctor recommended CLINDAMYCIN 50mg daily for 5days which is being given further 75 md is recommended for next 10 days.And putiing kiskin oinment over affected area.The improvement is visible.1) his diet has gone down. What appetizer is to be given to boost up diet.It is NINE yrs old.Lhasa Mixed breed.2) any other precaution to be taken?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Hi . Please explore if his urination has changed lately. Does he drink excess water too? Is he lethargic? How are his stools? If So, kindly get a blood work done. Clindamycin can sometimes burden kidneys, and its wise to be careful in a patient aging 9 yrs. Possible to share his antibiogram(culture and sensitivity) report? Staph intermedius is a common skin pathogen, and i'm glad that its sensitive to most antibiotics at the moment - but can mutate into resistant strain if not treated judiciously. Hope this is helpful.

Hi doctors, what are the precautions must be taken for German shepherd dogs in summer, especially how to overcome the over heat from their body. Thank you.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi lybrate-user, Provide plenty of water, proper shade, take him for walking only in the early mornings or late evenings. Excercise also moderate during summer. Also you can provide soups in diet.
2 people found this helpful
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Sir mera dog german shepherd h and vo 9 saal ki h Sir usko 7-8 months say skin allergy ho rahe h. Maay treatment kar va te hu tub sahi ho jate h and again fir say ho jate h abhi usay khujli ho gaye starting hi h abhi may doctor say recommend bhi kar liya h Sir please aap mujhe uske skin allergy ka koi solution bataye. Please.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
Keep dogs sleeping and sitting place clean on daily basis by washing orvwopping with phenyl or currently svsilble antiseptics thatvwe use in homes (provided space is cemented or hv tiles etc) secondly wash the beddings also thirdly just observe if the dog is allergic to some specific allergent/ smell like some food item or fragerance etc etc.
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I have a female german shepherd, one year old. she's having bleeding. Do dogs also have periods. Or if not what is the reason and any serious problem. Please help I am very worried.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Bleeding do happen during heat period, it is normal. If complications of uterus are noticed, bleeding occurs due to infection, cancer etc generally a dry bitch showing such symptoms means she has her period.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful

My dog German shepherd age 9 months fully vaccinated female eating mud and clothes of my house and even slippers daily night it's digging mud in pots and having the mid approximately more than 1/2 kg it is eating what's the remedy? Weight is 20-25 kgs.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Chewing and eating things some times are outcome od developong taste in such thing. Do not punish for doing so. Keep emergy of your dog burn by giving good exercise. When ever she try to eat mud or clothe say no and give rigjt thing ti chew like chew bones etc. Do not leave clothes scattered in home and do not allow access of mud.
2 people found this helpful
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I have a labra puppy 6 weeks old. His mother is no more. I worried about his health and food. How much quantity he needs. His weight is just 0.8kg. And Today after 18 hours he pooped at last but just after an hour and his meal. He pooped again in a minute. This time the poop was a 20% liquid and 80% solid. Is it to worry about pooping twice or thrice in row. Please help. I am totally unknow about the puppy care.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
Donot overfeed the puppy keep hom on milk wirh virtually no solids for atleast another week or so. The point is stomach shoild stablise give some antacid syrup that human use 2 tsf 3 times a day.
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Hi doctors. My dog is 4 years labrador. There are some areas on his body where are few hairs left. With some redness. I am now using wokazole lotion. Please give some advice.

Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Wokazole is steroid combination it will subside the rashes for now but it can reappear. Next time get skin scraping done first.
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I have a 13 years old pomeranian bitch. She had stopped eating since a few weeks. On getting her blood tested and sonography, reports say that her kidney is weak and urea level is high. What should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., MVSc Pathology
Veterinarian, Bangalore
With the age the dogs kidney starts losing its functional ability. So now all you have to do is managemental and supportive therapy. Changes in the feed like giving renal diet and phosphate binders has to be followed. If the dog is still not taking food, better to go for fluid therapy.
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C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
TAKING CARE OF PETS

Dog hygiene
Risk of transmission from contact with dogs is low and may be further reduced by simple precautions.
Dogs should be seen by a veterinarian on a regular basis.
Dogs should be treated promptly for diarrhea.
Dogs should be vaccinated for rabies.
Dogs should be treated to prevent heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis).
Effective flea control requires treatment of affected dogs, their environment, and other animals they contact.
Dogs should be fed high quality commercial food.
Dogs should not eat raw meat or eggs. Raw meat may have higher rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella in their stools
Dogs should not be allowed to eat garbage, feces, or hunt.
Dogs should not be allowed to drink non-potable water (e.G, surface water or toilet water).
Dogs should be inspected for ticks regularly.
Dog owners should wash their hands following contact with or cleaning up dog feces.
Groups at high risk for serious infection from pets include: Persons with waning immunity (e.G, older adults); children less than five years old; pregnant women and immunocompromised patients with AIDS, those without a functioning spleen or taking immunosuppressive therapy
To avoid infections, people at higher risk should take particular precautions with any animal contact.
They should do thorough and frequent hand wash
They should avoid contact with animals and their environment (e.G, pens, bedding and manure).
HIV positive patients should carry following precautions
When obtaining a new pet, they should avoid animals aged 6 months (or 1 year for cats)
They should be cautious when obtaining a pet from pet-breeding facilities, pet stores, and animal shelters, because of highly variable hygienic and sanitary conditions.
They should avoid stray animals.
They should avoid contact with any animal that has diarrhea.
They should seek veterinary care for animals with diarrheal illness, and a fecal sample from such animals should be examined for Cryptosporidium, Salmonella and Campylobacter.
They should wash their hands after handling pets, including before eating, and should avoid contact with pets' feces.
They should avoid contact with reptiles (e.G, snakes, lizards, iguanas, and turtles) as well as chicks and ducklings because of the risk for salmonellosis.
They should wear gloves during aquarium cleaning to reduce the risk for infection with Mycobacterium marinum.
They should avoid contact with exotic pets (e.G, nonhuman primates).
3 people found this helpful

STRATEGIC DEWORMING GUIDELINES

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule. Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food, while hookworms live on blood, causing anemia.

Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms. We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm dogs and cats. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites because they have already caused damage at this point.

STRATEGIC DEWORMING GUIDELINES

Strategically deworming dogs and cats is a practice recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DEWORMING PUPPIES AND KITTENS
Worms in puppies and kittens are common. This growth phase of their life is when they are most susceptible! Knowing when to worm puppies and kittens is important.
• Deworm puppies and kittens at 2, 4, 6, & 8 weeks of age, then again at 12 & 16 weeks of age.
• Deworm again at 6 months and 1 year.
• Then deworm as an adult.

ADULTS - WORMING DOGS AND CATS

We are recommending the standard here. If your dog or cat is a big hunter, they will need more frequent deworming - you must assess the risk for your pet.

• General Dog or Cat Worming: Thrice a year for life.
o Dogs put everything in their mouth and need deworming twice a year to eliminate the parasites they will pick up. Deworm outside cats thrice a year for the same reason.
• Cats that are strictly inside animals: Deworm twice a year.
• Cats that like to hunt: 3 times a year may be necessary.

NEWLY ACQUIRED ANIMALS
No matter what the history or age, assume they have parasites!
• Deworm immediately and repeat in 2 weeks.
• Then put on the above adult program.

WORMS IN DOGS AND CATS

DOGS :
• Roundworms and Hookworms
• Roundworms, Hookworms, Whipworms & Tapeworms

CATS:

• Tapeworm, Roundworm & Hookworms
4 people found this helpful

I am from dhanbad I have a cow two days before she has eaten excess food grains due to which her stomach become very tight now she is not eating any thing so please help me what I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your cow is suffering from acidosis due to eating excess food grains. Give plenty of water and feed only greens if it takes for 2-3 days. Give RUMENTAS 2 boli 2 times daily for 3 days and also give BLONIL Liquid orally 50 ml 2 times daily for 2 days.
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My daughter, a female pug, 5 years old who has recently developed some grey rough patches near nail roots in left paw and a slightly bigger similar patch above with hair loss. Initially, her nails bled and we started applying ay fungal topicals. The patches are still there and occasionally she limps. Any suggestion is deeply appreciated.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dear sir its seems to be a skin infection please let me know the details with photos and previous treatement and other things so we could be discussing a lot.
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I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
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My puppy is suffering from cold, too much vomiting, not eating food from 2-3 days

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be of systemic infection as you said puppy .Please rule out vaccination history and suspect infectious diseases.
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C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
What does humanizing your dog mean?

Talking to your dog like he/she is a person.
Treating your dog like he/she is a person.
Allowing dogs to do what they want because it will hurt their "feelings"
Dressing them up in little doggie clothes.
Remember, humanizing your dog is fulfilling your own human needs, not your dogs. Humanizing dogs does more harm than good.
9 people found this helpful

6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
673 people found this helpful

BVSC
Veterinarian, Ballia
The skin of your dog is entirely different from ours. There is significant ph difference so their skin is more sensitive than ours. Their body secretes some essential oils which gets depleted once you start bathing them daily. It results in drying of skin leading to flakes formation of policy kit is.
Some tips to remember---
*bathe your pets once in 10 days.
*groom your pets daily.
*do not use dettol/phenolic compounds on their body. It can be allergic.
*don't allow ticks/fleas/mites to thrive on their body.
*for hairy breeds, go for a complete hair-cut in summers.
*for breeds with drooping ears, take special care about ear cleaning.
*never use human soaps & shampoos like dove/clinic plus on dogs body. It can cause allergic dermatitis.
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