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Dr. M S Krishnakanth

Veterinarian, Hyderabad

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Dr. M S Krishnakanth Veterinarian, Hyderabad
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My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. M S Krishnakanth
Dr. M S Krishnakanth is a renowned Veterinarian in Banjara Hills, Hyderabad. You can visit him at Claws & Paws in Banjara Hills, Hyderabad. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. M S Krishnakanth on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Claws & Paws

Road No-10, Banjara Hills, Landmark: Near Hyderabad School of Business, HyderabadHyderabad Get Directions
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We have adopted a Persian cat she is 5 months old she is getting some infection kind a things on her right ear corner and on her back please suggest.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, you should deworm your dog every month upto 6m and later every 3 months. Clean the ear with ambiflush ear drops every 10 days/ after bathing. Follow manufacture instructions.
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My 2 month old labrador puppy is detected with canine distemper. Please tell me the cure and treatment for this disease.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Can use some poultry vaccine in initial stage to cure but if crosses stages can not do anything but still can maintain it.
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My Pet Dog Name is Rocky. Today A other wild and Dirty Big Dog Injured My Dog. He bite his jaw very badly, A lot of bleeding happens After this I bathe my dog but bleeding not stop. please tell me what I do. Their is lack of dog doctor.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My Pet Dog Name is Rocky. Today A other wild and Dirty Big Dog Injured My Dog. He bite his jaw very badly, A lot of b...
Its emergency tie a wet cloth around and take it to doc. U can not do self medication in emergency.
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My femail dog have cross in 3 days continue i thik she have sufering from period so pls u tell me the abortion medicine so she couldn't pregnent.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use unwanted kit from mankind . Under veterinarian supervision . Dont use it as on table counter medicine . Or seek a vets advice as soon as possible
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

I have a pug female dog. She is 1 year old and she has the problem of bleeding what should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Dear lybrate-user bleeding from which body part please clarify. If it is from its genital area and its mild, it could be due to her heat period. Along with bleeding there may be slight swelling of her visible genital parts. Please share photograph and name o bleeding part to give you precise advise.
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I have 22 months german shepherd female. N she is not eating properly. . Her health is not developing .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Need to access the food quality and you r diet regime and if needed we have to include more protein diet please consult a vet for diet.
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5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

I wanna ask for my pet Labrador, he is suffering from kidney dysfunction, last 1.5 month he is not able to eat any thing as I tried he start vomit after a couple of hours, blood test kft done on 28/10/17. Result are 1) serum phosphorous 18.4 2) serum sodium 149.6 3) blood urea 210.8 4) serum creatinine 20.4 5) serum uric acid 1.01 6) albumin 2.71 7) a:g ratio 0.66 These all are bold in test. Please suggest what should I do he is one of my life member whom I love so much age 8 years. Is there any possibility to make him fine .any kind of treatment.

B.A.M.S, MD (Ayu.) Kayachikitsa
Ayurveda,
Thanks for contacting with your health concern 1. Chronic renal disease [CKD] cannot be cured or reversed but treatment and management aimed at the contributing factors and symptoms can slow its progression. 2. Please see a good and experienced Veterinarian doctor to exclude decreased blood flow or oxygen delivery to the kidneys, any infection (s) and/or urinary obstruction. 3. He needs hospitalization for immediate medical treatment aimed at correcting fluid and electrolyte imbalance, and it's your Veterinarian who is in the best position to let you know about the prognosis. PS. For diet in kidney disease kindly book an appointment on Lybrate itself.
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