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Dr. B G Ratnam  - Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad

Dr. B G Ratnam

88 (10 ratings)
MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh

Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad

30 Years Experience  ·  800 at clinic
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Dr. B G Ratnam 88% (10 ratings) MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
30 Years Experience  ·  800 at clinic
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Personal Statement

My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. B G Ratnam
Dr. B G Ratnam is a trusted Neurosurgeon in Banjara Hills, Hyderabad. He has over 30 years of experience as a Neurosurgeon. He has done MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh . You can visit him at Neuroclinic in Banjara Hills, Hyderabad. Book an appointment online with Dr. B G Ratnam and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Neurosurgeons in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Neurosurgeons with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. We will help you find the best Neurosurgeons online in Hyderabad. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery) - CMC Vellore - 1988
MCh - CMC Vellore - 1997
Professional Memberships
NEUROLOGICAL SOCIETY OF INDIA
ASSOCIATION OF SPINAL SURGEONS OF INDIA
CHRISTIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF INDIA

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Neuroclinic

Banjara HillsHyderabad Get Directions
800 at clinic
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Patient Review Highlights

"Well-reasoned" 1 review "Professional" 1 review "knowledgeable" 1 review "Very helpful" 1 review

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I am suffering from bells palsy please tell me veg food material for recover as early as possible.

MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh
Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
I am suffering from bells palsy please tell me veg food material for recover as early as possible.
Bells palsy (if it is a correct diagnosis .) will not change the course or severity of problem with diet. If diabetes is coexist, then diet is accordingly.
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My mom is suffering from a brain tumor in 8 months ago. Then a brain tumor operation held in this time. But thereafter no problem occurred. But next time checking time seeing MRI report doctor said that tumor is gradually increase again. So they suggested to take a electro radiotherapy. I need help for right decision about my mom.

MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh
Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
My mom is suffering from a brain tumor in 8 months ago. Then a brain tumor operation held in this time. But thereafte...
Most important things that tell you regarding tumor recurrence are 1. Histopathology of the tumor 2 extent of removal by the first surgeon. Your doctors advise of radiation for tumor recurrence is correct.
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My wife before 10 years ago paralysis attack after treatment she is ok. After few day me & my high tensed. My wife now feel her brain van flooding few seconds & then his van normal & her body feel very week & shivering. Please tell what is this.

MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh
Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
She should have EEG test to look for epilepsy. 2 infection and fever with chills should be addressed by physician.
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Pituitary Surgery: What You Need To Know?

MBBS , MCh (Neursurgery), MCh
Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
Pituitary Surgery: What You Need To Know?

Endocrine complications

DI and anterior pituitary insufficiency were the most frequent complications reported in the national survey. With the least experienced surgeons, one of five transsphenoidal operations resulted in both of these complications. In contrast, the incidence of these complications was lower in the hands of the most experienced surgeons.

Figure 11Postoperative anterior pituitary insufficiency has been reported in the literature as being rare (72). Various series cite an incidence ranging from less than 1 to 10% (63, 97,101), with one series reporting an incidence of 27% (82). Postoperative anterior pituitary insufficiency was also reported to occur more frequently after removal of larger tumors and in patients whose anterior pituitary functions were impaired pre-operatively (63).The residual normal anterior pituitary tissue can be identified in the preoperative, T1-weighted, infused magnetic resonance imaging scans as a thin layer of enhanced tissue draping around the tumor,mostly over the upper pole of the tumor (Fig. 11). Every effort should be made to preserve this attenuated, residual, normal anterior pituitary tissue, because it can prove sufficient to maintain or even improve anterior pituitary functions in the postoperative period (64).

Temporary post-transsphenoidal surgery DI has been reported to occur in 10 to 60% of cases (26, 68, 82). Permanent DI, however,seems to be relatively rare, with the reported incidence ranging in most large series from 0.5 to 15% (8, 26, 44, 52, 61, 68, 71,97,101). DI after removal of microadenomas usually occurs as a consequence of stalk manipulations. Vertically oriented vessels on the pale-reddish stalk are helpful landmarks for recognizing the stalk. In pituitary macroadenomas, the stalk and the posterior lobe are often not seen because they can be displaced in any direction, flattened, and covered by a fibrous layer. The latter finding explains the relatively low incidence of permanent postoperative DI in patients undergoing removal of pituitary macroadenomas.

In addition, the postoperative course can be complicated by inappropriate secretion of the antidiuretic hormone, which occurs usually on the 6th or 7th postoperative day and thus frequently after the patient has been released from the hospital (5,15,19,95, 97). One of the explanations for this phenomenon is presumed necrosis of a portion of the posterior lobe because of surgical trauma, resulting in a sudden release of the antidiuretic hormone.

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