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Dr. S K Dhingra

BVSc & AH, MVSc

Veterinarian, Gurgaon

38 Years Experience
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Dr. S K Dhingra BVSc & AH, MVSc Veterinarian, Gurgaon
38 Years Experience
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. S K Dhingra
Dr. S K Dhingra is one of the best Veterinarians in Sector-25, Gurgaon. He has had many happy patients in his 38 years of journey as a Veterinarian. He has done BVSc & AH, MVSc . You can visit him at Dhingra' Pet Clinic & Boarding Centre in Sector-25, Gurgaon. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. S K Dhingra on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Gurgaon and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
BVSc & AH - NAGPUR VETERINARY COLLEGE, - 1980
MVSc - Bombay Veterinary College, Mumbai, - 1982
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

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Dhingra' Pet Clinic & Boarding Centre

K 17/4a Ground Floor, K 3 Lane, Behind Beverly Park II, Dlf Phase II, GurgaonGurgaon Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Hi. I have a 2 months old rabbit. He is too much energetic and playful. But last 30 hrs he do not eat anything. He also have symptom of appetite loss. All the day he stay in a hunched position on corner. I failed to feed him anything. I also tried liv 52 syrup & simethicone tablets. But my bunny is not ready to eat it. So what I Do?

Diploma in Clinical Nutrition, Certified Diabetes Educator, Diploma in Sport & Exercise Nutrition, Diploma in Human Nutrition, Lifestyle Medicine, BSC IN LIFE SCIENCES
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Bangalore
Give him only natural food like carrots, leafy vegetable, fruit pieces etc. Do not give him human food.

My dog is 1 month old. It is a Pomeranian breed. What all food can be given to him? Can I give him a bath?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
My dog is 1 month old. It is a Pomeranian breed. What all food can be given to him? Can I give him a bath?
No bath till he is of 3 months old. Till then you can use puppy wipes and dry shampoos available at the pet stores. For food, please give one cup of 80℅ diluted milk mixed with one raw egg and 1 small tsp coconut oil. Twice a day. Puppy chew stix for dental health. One cup of royal canine mini junior once a day.

Mere dog ko kafi khujli Ho thi hai or uske puri body par red nissan ho gaye hai meine uske body or red liquid dawai bhi Lagai thi par firse Ho gaye hai.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Medicated shampoos weekly injection course right food application of medicines on body plus tablets will be given as per the situatuon. Go to a vet

6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
673 people found this helpful

My dog, Jay, is a German Shepherd and he is three months old. He is skinny and he weighs nearly 8.5 kg. Is this the appropriate weight or should he be weighing more? if so what should be done?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
You can try gemon food from itally a premium food with 31 percent protien and 21 percent fat and 4300 k cal / kg of food you get when digested and the 20 kg cost you only 6500 very cheap and good in results.
3 people found this helpful

STRATEGIC DEWORMING GUIDELINES

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule. Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food, while hookworms live on blood, causing anemia.

Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms. We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm dogs and cats. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites because they have already caused damage at this point.

STRATEGIC DEWORMING GUIDELINES

Strategically deworming dogs and cats is a practice recommended by the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DEWORMING PUPPIES AND KITTENS
Worms in puppies and kittens are common. This growth phase of their life is when they are most susceptible! Knowing when to worm puppies and kittens is important.
• Deworm puppies and kittens at 2, 4, 6, & 8 weeks of age, then again at 12 & 16 weeks of age.
• Deworm again at 6 months and 1 year.
• Then deworm as an adult.

ADULTS - WORMING DOGS AND CATS

We are recommending the standard here. If your dog or cat is a big hunter, they will need more frequent deworming - you must assess the risk for your pet.

• General Dog or Cat Worming: Thrice a year for life.
o Dogs put everything in their mouth and need deworming twice a year to eliminate the parasites they will pick up. Deworm outside cats thrice a year for the same reason.
• Cats that are strictly inside animals: Deworm twice a year.
• Cats that like to hunt: 3 times a year may be necessary.

NEWLY ACQUIRED ANIMALS
No matter what the history or age, assume they have parasites!
• Deworm immediately and repeat in 2 weeks.
• Then put on the above adult program.

WORMS IN DOGS AND CATS

DOGS :
• Roundworms and Hookworms
• Roundworms, Hookworms, Whipworms & Tapeworms

CATS:

• Tapeworm, Roundworm & Hookworms
4 people found this helpful

These's been a lot of hair loss in my dog I have been using petglow tonic from a couple of days but there's no improvement.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please continue with any tonic which contain omega 3 and 6 oil at least for a month and see for the results they all can't produce results in hours. Sir need to wait./// as the damage caused took so much time to disintegrate the skin and you need same or twice time to repair it.
4 people found this helpful

I am 30 years old female. I have pet cat in home. I want to know is there any blood test that can detect if I have any infection in my blood or body from cats? Please advise.

MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bidar
Hello. You need not worry about infection from your pet unless you have had it vaccinated and you are active and healthy. There are certain blood tests which are indicative of infection, but only done is risky patients. For more details consult me.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful
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