Lybrate Mini logo
Lybrate for
Android icon App store icon
Ask FREE Question Ask FREE Question to Health Experts
Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Dr. Krishna

Veterinarian, Gurgaon

200 at clinic
Dr. Krishna Veterinarian, Gurgaon
200 at clinic
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Krishna
Dr. Krishna is an experienced Veterinarian in New Gurgaon, Gurgaon. You can meet Dr. Krishna personally at vet care and pet cure in New Gurgaon, Gurgaon. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Krishna on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Gurgaon and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment

kd rishi chowk, state bank adjacent lane, khandsa road, shivaji nagar, gurgaon, GurgaonGurgaon Get Directions
200 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments
7 days validity
Consult Now

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Krishna

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I have mix labrador 13 months old and i want him to gain some weight so tell me medium budget diet for him if possible home made diets for him please tell me ?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Given him chicken 80 gm and 200 gm rice with tab calcium and multivitamin twice a day if 25 kg dogs body weight
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Preventive Health care: As pets age faster than humans, a year is a long time in a dog's life. We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden.
It is recommended that every pet should receive a general health evaluation once in 6 months. A preventive health visit should cover following aspects:
• Vaccination status
• Parasite control for intestinal parasites, ear mites, ticks and fleas.
• Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odours, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
• Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
• Exercise - how much exercise your dog receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your dog's ability to exercise
• Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
• Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
• Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
• Behaviour – any behaviour problems such as barking, changes in temperament, any obsessive behaviour, urinary accidents
• Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
• Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
• Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, Neutering - if it has not already been performed
• Blood tests – especially for geriatric dogs, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
6 people found this helpful

My German shepherd dog 4 month old suffered with swelling in leg near elbow. No issues in walking, playing with others dog, eating etc.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
One of the such condition is hygroma. Provide him soft bedding and get him check with vet for correct diagnosis.
3 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog is 5 years old she is not eating from last 3 days whatever she eats she vomit back. What to do? Went to a Dr. he said that she's is suffering from gastrointestinal infection today he provided drip and don't know which medicine but my pet is not eating anything and she is very lethargic right now. I'm worried. Yesterday she had a fever of 104°C but today no fever was there.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My dog is  5 years old she is not eating from last 3 days whatever she eats she vomit back. What to do? Went to a Dr....
please follow up the regular ceck up to the vet it may be from as simple as gastrointestinal infection to forieng body in stomach , please take a xray and scan to identityfy the things ......
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

How to reduce insects from pet? Best medicine?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
Medicines are to be use according to age scalibor band is best in my opinion as it protects your pets from ectoparasites moreover protects your pets upto six months.
4 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My kitten abscess wound has got maggots in her. She is 3 months old how to kill maggots at home.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Please apply maggout spray on the wound. And take it to a vet. As it may require wound dressing and antibiotic injection also. After wards you can dress it at home itself and also oral medicines.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

How I can care of my puppy dog pet?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian,
There are lot of thing which you need to keep in mind while having pet. Few are: proper feeding: small meals prevent from common source of infection basic training: like toilet training.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a 45 day old french mastiff that has lameness in his hind legs that started 24 hours after administering puppy DP. He is alert and active, eating fine, not throwing up and no fever. What could be the cause and what is the cure?

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
It is just trauma to the nerve, it happens sometimes giving a prick, by a vet. But don't bother, it will go, analgesics will give relief very soon but not necessary. I suggest, analgesic (pain killer) ointment daily two-three times is enough & light massage.
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful

I think my dog have an ear infection. What should i do? and he does not let me touch his ear.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Ear infection is painful so u hv to show to vet so he will put muzzle or under sedation he will clean ear and tell proper medicine
You found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog is having rashes all over his body.what should I do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
Better give him methyl predisonolne tablets 8 mg daily twice for 3 days if not corrected take it to local vet also can use wokazole.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

5 Tips To Maintain Your Dog’s Dental Health

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
5 Tips To Maintain Your Dog’s Dental Health
5 Tips to maintain your Dog’s Dental Health

It is fairly easy to keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy provided that you regularly take care of your pet and go for frequent health check-ups. Moreover, conducting regular checks at your home will also go a long way in identifying a problem in its nascent stage.

Here are five tips to ensure that your dog’s dental health remains perfect.

1) Prevent tooth decay - If your dog frequently consumes plaque-forming food products, it can lead to subsequent build up on its teeth and ultimately lead to certain problems such as tooth loss, gingivitis and receding gums. Ensure that you clean your dog’s teeth on a daily basis in order to avoid any form of tooth decay.

2) Check your dog’s breath - Although dog breath is usually not pleasant; if your dog smells unusually foul, you should get a check-up done. Moreover, observe if this foul breath is coupled with other issues such as vomiting, excessive urinating or sudden loss of appetite.

3) Encourage your dog to play with chew toys - Chew toys assist in providing stronger teeth to your pet, while giving a perfect massage for its gums. In addition, continuous chomping helps remove soft tartar and thus keeps teeth clean. Nylon, rubber and rawhide chew toys are the safest for your dog.

4) Identify signs of oral disease - A number of oral diseases can be prevented or controlled if they are diagnosed at an early stage. Major symptoms of almost all oral diseases are loose teeth, swollen gums, foul breath, excessive drooling, tumours in the gums and cysts under the tongue.

5) Carefully examine your dog’s teeth and gums - Healthy gums of a dog are indicated by the fact that they are pink in colour and have no signs of swelling. As for the teeth, they should not have any traces of tartar. Carry out this teeth and gum examination each week by lifting your dog’s lips and observing carefully.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.

From Lybrate: If you found this tip useful, please thank the doctor by clicking on the heart icon below. Also, spread good health by sharing this tip with your loved ones over WhatsApp, Facebook and other media.
2144 people found this helpful

My dog back leg was broken.What did I do?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian,
You have to figure out which bone is broken. Get x-ray done for that part. After x-ray get consult with the vet.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir my dog is not eating any thing after she given a baby so plzzz tell me wht should i do?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
It could be due placental infection so feed her some chicken soup and glucose orally if she doesn't then show to vet
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds


Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

10. Tosa Inu
Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

9. Pit Bulls
Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

8. Perro de Presa Canario
Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

7. Neapolitan Mastiff
Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

6. Fila Brasileiro
Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

5. Dogo Argentino
These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

3. Boerboel
Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

2. American Bulldog
American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

1. American Bandogge
These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
3 people found this helpful
View All Feed