Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Dr. Isha Malhotra - Dentist, Gurgaon

Dr. Isha Malhotra

95 (4000 ratings)
BDS

Dentist, Gurgaon

14 Years Experience  ·  300 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Dr. Isha Malhotra 95% (4000 ratings) BDS Dentist, Gurgaon
14 Years Experience  ·  300 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services
Reviews

Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Isha Malhotra
Dr. Isha Malhotra is a trusted Dentist in DLF-III, Gurgaon. She has over 14 years of experience as a Dentist. She has done BDS . You can visit her at Dental Solutions in DLF-III, Gurgaon. She has been reviewed by 32 patients. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Isha Malhotra on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 39 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Dentists online in Gurgaon. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
BDS - Bharati Vidyapeeth Dental College & Hospital, Pune - 2004
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Member of Indian Dental Association

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Isha Malhotra

Dental Solutions

U-12/8, DLF Phase-3, Behind RBS Building GurgaonGurgaon Get Directions
  4.8  (4000 ratings)
300 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments. Get first response within 6 hours.
7 days validity ₹300 online
Consult Now
Phone Consult
Schedule for your preferred date/time
15 minutes call duration ₹300 online
Consult Now

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Isha Malhotra

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Patient Review Highlights

"Very helpful" 120 reviews "knowledgeable" 88 reviews "Helped me impr..." 10 reviews "Sensible" 19 reviews "Professional" 18 reviews "Practical" 11 reviews "Well-reasoned" 20 reviews "Prompt" 6 reviews "Saved my life" 1 review "Caring" 25 reviews "Inspiring" 9 reviews "Thorough" 11 reviews "Nurturing" 2 reviews

Reviews

Popular
All Reviews
View More
View All Reviews

Feed

I am 27-year-old female. I always have a bad breath problem. I have washed mouth few times but still every time my mouth smells bad. Is there any permanent solution for this.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
I am 27-year-old female. I always have a bad breath problem. I have washed mouth few times but still every time my mo...
You might have deposit / calculus on teeth. Kindly get it checked by dentist and you might need cleaning and polishing of teeth.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Is oil pulling effective and safe? What are the possible benefits? Are there any scientific evidences? If yes, what oil should I use and how often to do it?

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Is oil pulling effective and safe? What are the possible benefits? Are there any scientific evidences? If yes, what o...
Oil pulling is an age-old remedy rooted in Ayurvedic medicine that uses natural substances to clean and detoxify teeth and gums. It has the added effect of whitening teeth naturally and evidence even shows that it may be beneficial for gum health and that certain oils may help fight harmful bacteria in the mouth! What is Oil Pulling? Oil pulling seems to be a practice with a plethora of anecdotal support but a lack of extensive scientific studies (though there are some… see below). Most sources do agree that oil pulling is safe, but debate how effective it is. Though more research is needed to determine any scientific backing to oil pulling, I’ve noticed the benefits personally and dozens of readers swear by its effectiveness as well. In fact, in my original research, I found hundreds of testimonials online from people who experienced benefits from oil pulling, including help with skin conditions, arthritis, asthma, headaches, hormone imbalances, infections, liver problems and more. Though I’ve done this for a few years, my only personal experience is with increased oral health (no plaque) and less sensitive (and whiter!) teeth. I’ve heard several experts explain how bacteria and infection can enter the blood through the mouth, it does make sense that addressing these infections could have an impact in other parts of the body, I just haven’t had personal experience with this. At the very least, I think that oil pulling can be very beneficial and has no downside as long as a quality oil (that is high enough quality to eat) is used and it is done correctly. Oil pulling is a very inexpensive therapy that could potentially have great benefit on oral health, so I see no downside to trying it and I have used it myself for several years. How to Oil Pull The concept is incredibly simple. Basically, a person swishes a couple teaspoons of a vegetable based oil (coconut, sesame or olive) in the mouth for 20 minutes and then spits it out and rinses well. Oil pulling is best done in the morning, before eating or drinking anything, though Dr. suggests that it can be done before each meal if needed for more severe infections or dental problems. Oil Pulling Instructions Put 1-2 teaspoons of oil into the mouth. The oil traditionally used in oil pulling is organic sesame oil, and this is also the oil that has been the most studied for use in oil pulling. It is also possible to do oil pulling with organic coconut oil or pre-made coconut oil chews. Whichever oil you choose, place 1-2 teaspoons in the mouth. I also pour a few drops of Brushing Blend (naturally antibacterial) into the mix. Swish for 20 minutes. Oil Pulling Therapy, as this is long enough to break through plaque and bacteria but not long enough that the body starts re-absorbing the toxins and bacteria. The oil will get thicker and milky as it mixed with saliva during this time and it should be creamy-white when spit out. It will also double in volume during this time due to saliva. At first, it can be difficult to make it the full 20 minutes, and I didn’t stress if I could only swish for 5-10 minutes when I first started. Spit oil into the trash can. Especially if you have a septic system like I do don’t spit into the sink! The oil may thicken and clog pipes. Do not swallow the oil as it is hopefully full of bacteria, toxins and pus that are now not in the mouth! Rinse well with warm water. Warm water seems to clean the mouth better (my opinion). I swish a few times with warm water to get any remaining oil out of my mouth. Some sources recommend swishing with warm salt water. Brush well. I prefer to brush with Brushing Blend to make sure any remaining bacteria is killed. This can also be done with coconut oil, which is naturally antibacterial and has a milder taste that other oils. Anyone with a sensitivity to coconut oil or coconut products should avoid using coconut oil in this way. Sesame oil was traditionally used in the Ayurvedic tradition and is another great option, just make sure to use an organic sesame oil. Is Oil Pulling Safe? Thankfully, this is one point that all sources seem to agree on! Some sources claim that oil pulling doesn’t have the benefits often attributed to it or that it doesn’t actually detoxify the mouth, but all of them agree that it shouldn’t hurt anything. All of the oils that are often used are completely edible and considered to be healthy when eaten, so they aren’t problematic when swished in the mouth. The only potential danger I’ve seen is if the oil is swallowed after it has absorbed any bacteria or toxins from the mouth. When I asked my own dentist about oil pulling, I was told that while the research is lacking, it could be considered an effective and safe alternative to mouthwash and that there shouldn’t be any harm to trying it. What Oil Should Be Used for Pulling? It depends. If the goal is whitening the teeth, I’ve found coconut oil to be most effective (especially when combined with this unusual remedy). Coconut oil is also slightly more effective at removing certain bacteria from the mouth, including the Streptococcus mutans bacteria that is known for causing dental caries (source). Sesame oil is recommended by most sources (though this is partially because it was one of the more widely available oils when the practice first started years ago) and it is also the most well studied and considered safe for those who are not allergic to sesame seeds. Olive oil is sometimes used, though some sources claim that it is too harsh for the teeth. The main thing is to avoid using any high Omega-6 or chemically created oils like vegetable oil, canola oil, soybean oil, corn oil, etc. Who Can Do Oil Pulling? Children: Several practitioners I’ve asked about this said that oil pulling is safe for kids once they are old enough not to swallow the oil. Pregnancy: I’ve done oil pulling during pregnancy but I was also doing it regularly before I got pregnant. I asked a midwife and she said that it is generally considered safe for pregnant women, especially after the first trimester. Oral health is especially important during pregnancy so I’ve always been glad to have an extra way to keep my teeth and gums healthy while pregnant and just consider it like brushing or using mouthwash. (Purely anecdotal- I haven’t had a cavity, even while pregnant, since I started oil pulling and my oral health routine). As with anything, check with a doctor or midwife before doing oil pulling, especially if pregnant. Nursing: Generally considered safe but check with a dentist or doctor to be safe. Dental Issues: I got the ok to do this from my dentist and doctor with several (non-amalgam) fillings in my mouth but I’d check with a doctor or dentist to be sure, especially if you have any metal fillings, crowns, or dental problems. Note: Some people supposedly notice a detox reaction for the first few days of using oil pulling that usually includes mild congestion, headache, mucous drainage or other effects. I personally didn’t notice any of these effects, but have read cases of others who did.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Does leukoplakia is curable is this danger can any one tell me my tongue is burning and I show to ENT doctor he said to check blood test once vitamin b12 nd B I am worrying about this problem my tongue side curves getting white lightly and burning sensation when my tongue touches teeth it irritates me what is this can any one will tell what it is Please suggest for that..

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Does leukoplakia is curable is this danger can any one tell me my tongue is burning and I show to ENT doctor he said ...
Symptoms Leukoplakia usually occurs on your gums, the insides of your cheeks, the bottom of your mouth — beneath the tongue — and, sometimes, your tongue. It isn't usually painful and may go unnoticed for a while. Leukoplakia may appear: White or grayish in patches that can't be wiped away Irregular or flat-textured Thickened or hardened in areas Along with raised, red lesions (speckled leukoplakia or erythroplakia), which are more likely to show precancerous changes Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia causes fuzzy, white patches that resemble folds or ridges, usually on the sides of your tongue. It's often mistaken for oral thrush, an infection marked by creamy white patches that can be wiped away, which is also common in people with a weakened immune system. When to see a doctor Even though leukoplakia doesn't usually cause discomfort, sometimes it can indicate a more serious condition. See your dentist or primary care professional if you have any of the following: White plaques or sores in your mouth that don't heal on their own within two weeks Lumps or white, red or dark patches in your mouth Persistent changes in the tissues of your mouth Ear pain when swallowing Progressive reduction in the ability to open your jaw Causes Although the cause of leukoplakia is unknown, chronic irritation, such as from tobacco use, including smoking and chewing, appears to be responsible for most cases. Often, regular users of smokeless tobacco products eventually develop leukoplakia where they hold the tobacco against their cheeks. Other causes may include chronic irritation from: Jagged, broken or sharp teeth rubbing on tongue surfaces Broken or ill-fitting dentures Long-term alcohol use Your dentist can talk with you about what may be causing leukoplakia in your case. Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia results from infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Once you've been infected with EBV, the virus remains in your body for life. Normally, the virus is dormant, but if your immune system is weakened, especially from HIV/AIDS, the virus can become reactivated, leading to conditions such as hairy leukoplakia. Risk factors Tobacco use, particularly smokeless tobacco, puts you at high risk of leukoplakia and oral cancer. Long-term alcohol use increases your risk, and drinking alcohol combined with smoking increases your risk even more. Hairy leukoplakia People with HIV/AIDS are especially likely to develop hairy leukoplakia. Although the use of antiretroviral drugs has reduced the number of cases, hairy leukoplakia still affects a number of HIV-positive people, and it may be one of the first signs of HIV infection. Complications Leukoplakia usually doesn't cause permanent damage to tissues in your mouth. However, leukoplakia increases your risk of oral cancer. Oral cancers often form near leukoplakia patches, and the patches themselves may show cancerous changes. Even after leukoplakia patches are removed, the risk of oral cancer remains. Hairy leukoplakia Hairy leukoplakia isn't likely to lead to cancer. But it may indicate HIV/AIDS. Prevention You may be able to prevent leukoplakia if you avoid all tobacco products or alcohol use. Talk to your doctor about methods to help you quit. If you continue to smoke or chew tobacco or drink alcohol, have frequent dental checkups. Oral cancers are usually painless until fairly advanced, so quitting tobacco and alcohol is a better prevention strategy. Hairy leukoplakia If you have a weakened immune system, you may not be able to prevent hairy leukoplakia, but identifying it early can help you receive appropriate treatment. Diagnosis Most often, your doctor diagnoses leukoplakia by: Examining the patches in your mouth Attempting to wipe off the white patches Discussing your medical history and risk factors Ruling out other possible causes Testing for cancer If you have leukoplakia, your doctor will likely test for early signs of cancer by: Oral brush biopsy. This involves removing cells from the surface of the lesion with a small, spinning brush. This is a non-invasive procedure, but does not always result in a definitive diagnosis. Excisional biopsy. This involves surgically removing tissue from the leukoplakia patch or removing the entire patch if it's small. An excision biopsy is more comprehensive and usually results in a definitive diagnosis. If the biopsy is positive for cancer and your doctor performed an excisional biopsy that removed the entire leukoplakia patch, you may not need further treatment. If the patch is large, you may be referred to an oral surgeon or ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialist for treatment. Hairy leukoplakia If you have hairy leukoplakia, you'll likely be evaluated for conditions that may contribute to a weakened immune system. Treatment Leukoplakia treatment is most successful when a lesion is found and treated early, when it's small. Regular checkups are important, as is routinely inspecting your mouth for areas that don't look normal. For most people, removing the source of irritation ― such as stopping tobacco or alcohol ― clears the condition. When this isn't effective or if the lesions show early signs of cancer, the treatment plan may involve: Removal of leukoplakia patches. Patches may be removed using a scalpel, a laser or an extremely cold probe that freezes and destroys cancer cells (cryoprobe). Follow-up visits to check the area. Once you've had leukoplakia, recurrences are common. Treating hairy leukoplakia Usually, you don't need treatment for hairy leukoplakia. The condition often causes no symptoms and isn't likely to lead to mouth cancer. If your doctor recommends treatment, it may include: Medication. You may take a pill that affects your whole system (systemic medication), such as antiviral medications. These medications can suppress the Epstein-Barr virus, the cause of hairy leukoplakia. Topical treatment may also be used. Follow-up visits. Once you stop treatment, the white patches of hairy leukoplakia may return. Your doctor may recommend regular follow-up visits to monitor changes to your mouth or ongoing therapy to prevent leukoplakia patches from returning.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, Mere daant ka shape sahi nahi hai pointed ho gaya hai isko kese thik kar Please suggest something for easy option to shape it and also easy option to cover a very small gap between teeth.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
Hi, Mere daant ka shape sahi nahi hai pointed ho gaya hai isko kese thik kar Please suggest something for  easy optio...
You can get the sharp cusp grinded but for shape of teeth ...and gap between them you can go for veneers / laminates / crowns
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am suffering from submandibular gland stone in left side of neck. After done usg it seems that size of stone is been 14 mm x 11 mm. So what can I do .please suggest.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
I am suffering from submandibular gland stone in left side of neck. After done usg it seems that size of stone is bee...
Medical Care Management of submandibular sialadenitis and sialadenosis involves a wide range of approaches, from conservative medical management to more aggressive surgical intervention. One management scheme is as follows: Acute sialadenitis Medical management - Hydration, antibiotics (oral versus parenteral), warm compresses and massage, sialogogues Surgical management - Consideration of incision and drainage versus excision of the gland in cases refractory to antibiotics, incision and drainage with abscess formation, gland excision in cases of recurrent acute sialadenitis Salivary calculi Medical management - Hydration, compression and massage, antibiotics for the infected gland Surgical management - Duct cannulation with stone removal, gland excision in recurrent case Sjögren disease Medical management - Hydration, dental hygiene, rheumatology and dental referral Surgical management - Gland excision not usually needed unless recurrent acute sialadenitis Sialadenosis Medical management - Treatment of underlying cause Surgical management - Not indicated A prospective study by Choi et al indicated that following salivary stimulation therapy, patients with radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced sialadenitis may undergo a subjective reduction in symptoms but will not experience significant improvement in salivary gland function. The study involved 61 patients who were diagnosed with chronic RAI-induced sialadenitis following thyroidectomy and RAI treatment. After salivary stimulation with pilocarpine, significant improvement was seen in the patients’ subjective symptom scores; however, salivary flow rates and salivary gland scintigraphy parameters, as measured in the parotid and submandibular glands, were not significantly different from their prestimulation values. [8] Medical management of submandibular sialadenitis and sialadenosis centers on eliminating the causative factor. Acute sialadenitis In cases of acute sialadenitis, adequate hydration should be ensured and electrolyte imbalances corrected. Patients are most often treated on an outpatient basis, with the administration of a single dose of parenteral antibiotics in an emergency department, followed by oral antibiotics for a period of 7-10 days. Clindamycin (900 mg IV q8h or 300 mg PO q8h) is an excellent choice and provides good coverage against typical organisms. Patients who exhibit significant morbidity, are significantly dehydrated, or are septic should be admitted to hospital. In this latter group of patients, CT scanning of the area should be performed. If a large abscess is noted, incision and drainage should be considered. Small abscesses typically respond to conservative methods. In cases refractory to antibiotics, viral and atypical bacterial causes should be considered. Sialolithiasis Patients with sialolithiasis should be initially treated with hydration, warm compresses, and gland massage. Antibiotics are indicated in patients exhibiting infection. Sjögren disease In those patients with Sjögren disease, hydration and prevention of complications should be undertaken. Dental hygiene should be strictly maintained in order to prevent carries, and dental and rheumatology consults should be sought. Gland excision is rarely indicated. Sialadenosis: Sialadenosis should be managed expectantly. Treatment should be directed towards managing the underlying problem and achieving homeostasis. Gland excision is not indicated. Surgical Care Acute sialadenitis Patients who exhibit significant morbidity, are significantly dehydrated, or are septic should be admitted to hospital. In this latter group of patients, CT scanning of the area should be performed. If a large abscess is noted, incision and drainage should be considered. Small abscesses typically respond to conservative methods. In patients with recurrent acute attacks, gland excision during a period of quiescence should be considered. Serial CT scanning is often useful. Endoscopic management of sialadenitis frequently obviates the need for gland removal. Results follow a learning curve. [9] Chronic sialadenitis A retrospective study described sialendoscopy as a safe and effective means of treating children with recurrent or chronic sialadenitis. Semensohn et al examined the medical records of 12 pediatric patients who underwent diagnostic and therapeutic sialendoscopy for recurrent parotitis (nine patients) or chronic submandibular sialadenitis (three patients). During follow-up, which averaged 16.5 months, only one patient needed additional surgery (salvage parotidectomy), due to repeated recurrences. [10] Sialolithiasis In patients with calculi in proximity of the opening of the Wharton duct, the duct can be cannulated, dilated, and the stone removed via a transoral approach. Patients with deep intraparenchymal stones or multiple stones should have their glands excised on an elective basis. Ultrasonic lithotripsy is rarely effective and is not offered at the authors' institution. A study by Kopeć et al indicated that sialendoscopy and sialendoscopy-assisted surgery are effective treatments for lithiasis of the submandibular glands. The study found that of 175 patients with submandibular gland stones, complete stone removal was achieved in 149 of them, through either sialendoscopy alone (82 patients) or sialendoscopy with surgery (67 patients). The procedures were also effective in the treatment of lithiasis of the parotid glands. [11] Similarly, a prospective study by Aubin-Pouliot et al indicated that sialendoscopy-assisted salivary duct surgery is an effective treatment for chronic obstructive sialadenitis, especially that caused by sialolithiasis. In the study’s 40 patients (54 glands), the overall mean score on the Chronic Obstructive Sialadenitis Symptoms (COSS) questionnaire improved by 22.6 points, falling from 36.1 preoperatively to 13.5 at 3 months postoperatively. For submandibular gland patients specifically, the mean score fell from 38.1 preoperatively to 10.3, while for parotid gland patients the mean score fell from 32.6 to 19.0. The investigators found the greatest COSS score improvement in patients whose condition was caused by sialolithiasis, as opposed to those with radioactive iodine– or inflammatory-related sialolithiasis.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I suffered with a bad breath. I have consulted many Doctors in Pune. People around me can feel this problem but Doctor says there is no problem. Right from my mother, my friends, colleagues and everybody else talking to me can sense it strongly. I am about to marry. But due to this problem I am in such a condition where I am not able to talk to anybody about this. I just don't understand what to do. What could be the another reasons behind bad breath or could you please suggest me a dentist or the hospital where the special treatment for the bad breath is available? I am not at all addicted to anything. I have tried everything like tooth cleaning, tongue cleaning, flossing, using mouth washes etc. I am so much frustrated with this problem. I am feeling no joy in living. Please help.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
I  suffered with a bad breath. I have consulted many Doctors in Pune. People around me can feel this problem but Doct...
If you wear dentures, remove them at night and clean to get rid of bacterial buildup from food and drink. Drink plenty of water and swish cool water around in your mouth. This is especially helpful to freshen “morning breath.” Brush after every meal and floss, preferably twice a day. Replace your toothbrush every two to three months. Arrange regular dental checkups and cleanings. Scrape your tongue each morning with a tongue scraper or spoon to decrease the bacteria, fungi, and dead cells that can cause odor. Hold the tip of the tongue with gauze to pull it forward in order to clean the back of the tongue. Chew a handful of cloves, fennel seeds, or aniseeds. Their antiseptic qualities help fight halitosis-causing bacteria. Chew a piece of lemon or orange rind for a mouth- freshening burst of flavor. (Wash the rind thoroughly first.) The citric acid will stimulate the salivary glands—and fight bad breath. Chew a fresh sprig of parsley, basil, mint, or cilantro. The chlorophyll in these green plants neutralizes odors. Try a 30-second mouthwash rinse that is alcohol-free (unike many off-the-shelf products). Mix a cup of water with a teaspoon of baking soda (which changes the pH level and fights odor in the mouth) and a few drops of antimicrobial peppermint essential oil. Don’t swallow it! (Yields several rinses.) Or try this recipe from 500 TIME-TESTED HOME REMEDIES AND THE SCIENCE BEHIND THEM: CRUNCH IT Raw crunchy foods clean the teeth. Apples contain pectin, which helps control food odors and promotes saliva production. Cinnamon is antimicrobial. Active cultures in yogurt help reduce odor-causing bacteria in the mouth. 1 cup apple chunks 1 cup grated carrot 1 cup diced celery ½ cup dried cranberries ½ cup crushed walnuts 3 to 5 tablespoons plain nonfat yogurt Ground cinnamon PREPARATION AND USE: Mix the apple, carrot, celery, cranberries, and walnuts together in a large bowl. Add yogurt by the tablespoon to moisten the mixture. Sprinkle with cinnamon. (Serves two.) Save Your Breath!
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

For orthodontist. Do I have to wear my retainers every night. Throughout my life.(after removing braces for preventing relapsing. And I also have four extractions .

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
For orthodontist. Do I have to wear my retainers every night. Throughout my life.(after removing braces for preventin...
retainers have to be worn for 9 months post that you can remove them or else go for permanent retainers which are placed behind teeth ....
Submit FeedbackFeedback

For orthodontist. I am having braces for my teeth after four teeth extractions. After my 1 year completion would they come back to normal showing hollow teeth spaces? How many days did I have to wear retainers for preventing relapsing permanently. Please.

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
For orthodontist. I am having braces for my teeth after four teeth extractions. After my 1 year completion would they...
They will not come back the empty spaces you are talking about ...there are only 10 percent relapse chances after treatment ..retainers have to be worn for a period of 9 months ...and there are these other permanent retainers which are placed behind teeth .. but have to be worn for some time
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed