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Dr. Deepika Hooda  - Gynaecologist, Gurgaon

Dr. Deepika Hooda

90 (10 ratings)
Pt. B D Sharma Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Sawai Man ...

Gynaecologist, Gurgaon

9 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Book appointment and get ₹125 LybrateCash (Lybrate Wallet) after your visit
Dr. Deepika Hooda 90% (10 ratings) Pt. B D Sharma Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences... Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
9 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Deepika Hooda
Dr. Deepika Hooda is a Gynecologist and Obstetrician in Badshahpur, Gurgaon and has an experience of 6 years in these fields. Dr. Deepika Hooda practices at Safe Hands Hospital in Badshahpur, Gurgaon. She completed MBBS from Sawai Mansingh Medical College, Jaipur (SMS College) in 2010 and MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology from Rajasthan University, Jaipur, India in 2015. She is a member of Indian Medical Association (IMA) and Haryana State Medical Council. Some of the services provided by the doctor are: Obstetrics Problems,Child Birth Education,Normal Vaginal Delivery (NVD),Gynae Problems and Female Sexual Problems etc

Info

Education
Pt. B D Sharma Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak - Pt. B D Sharma Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak - 2010
Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan - Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, Rajasthan - 2015
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Indian Medical Association (IMA)
Haryana State Medical Council

Location

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Safe Hands Hospital

Sohna Gurgaon Road, Sector 66, Near Darbaripur Mod, GurgaonGurgaon Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Dr. Deepika Hooda Feeds

PMS - How To Deal With It?

PMS - How To Deal With It?

PMS is often treated as a joke but for many women, it is a monthly nightmare. Muscle cramps, headaches, bloating, breast tenderness, anxiety and depression are common symptoms of PMS. Though there is no set cure for PMS here are a few tips that will help you deal with it.

Set yourself an exercise routine
Exercising not only helps you maintain weight but also helps dealing with PMS. All you need are 30 minutes a day set aside to go for a brisk walk, jog, swim or even dance. Aerobic exercises like this improve blood circulation, ease stress and help the brain release more happy hormones.

Change your diet
If you are feeling bloated and depressed, cut back on simple carbohydrates like sugar and fat and increase your consumption of complex carbohydrates like fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Do not attempt a low carb diet to lose weight if you suffer from PMS. Reducing the simple carbohydrates in the body and increasing the complex carbohydrates keeps you body feeling full for longer and increases the serotonin levels in the body.

Quit alcohol and caffeine
Drinking a glass of wine of a cup of coffee may give you temporary relief from PMS symptoms but in the long run they aggravate your PMS symptoms such as headaches, breast tenderness and mood swings. Alcohol may also contribute towards lowering the magnesium levels in your body and thereby make you feel bloated.

Relax
One of the effects of PMs is to make you feel anxious and tense. The easiest way to address this is by learning to relax. Try meditation or yoga for half an hour every morning. This will improve your overall health as well as soothe muscle pains.

Take a few supplements
Research says that certain fatty acids like omega 3 and linoleic acid can lower irritability and body aches associated with PMS. Calcium is also known to help ease PMS symptoms. Getting these nutrients in the required levels may not be possible only through your daily meals. Hence, you can also consider supplements to ease your pains.

Use Birth control pills
Birth control pills with the drospirenone hormone can help ease symptoms of severe PMS. Menstruation is often accompanied by a drop in estrogen levels that can lead to migraines. Regular of birth control pills also regulates your hormones and hence avoids these fluctuations. It also keeps your ovaries from releasing eggs every month and hence reduces the intensity of the associated cramps.

Talk to people
You are not alone when it comes to PMS. Instead of keeping quiet about your discomfort, talk to people who may be experiencing something similar. Sharing your problems will introduce you to new ways of dealing with it. You could also get online support though various discussion groups.

3629 people found this helpful

Postmenopausal Bleeding - How To Treat It?

Postmenopausal Bleeding - How To Treat It?

Most women attain menopause between the ages of late 40s and early 60s, the average age being about 51. This is an important milestone in a women-s gynecological history. One major change is altered female hormone levels, and this leads to a lot of physiological changes. From hot flashes to mood swings, there is also increased predisposition to osteoporosis and uterine cancer.

If you have not had your menstrual cycles for close to 12 months, chances are you are into menopause. So, that means absolutely no vaginal bleeding anymore whatsoever. However, if you experience bleeding, even spotting, be on the alert. It is not normal and needs to be examined, and if required, diagnosed and treated.
Postmenopausal bleeding or PMB as it is popularly called can be due to a variety of reasons. While it could be something as trivial as inflammation of the uterine or vaginal lining, it could also be an indication of more severe issues like cancer.

-        Atrophic vaginitis - Decreasing hormonal levels lead to increased dryness and therefore inflammation of the vaginal and uterine tissue. This is one of the common causes of bleeding after menopause.

-        Endometrial atrophy - Also caused by lower hormone levels, the lining of the body of the uterus gradually thins down and can get inflamed.

-        Polyps - Noncancerous growths in the uterus, cervix, vulva, or vagina can also lead to bleeding

-        Infections - General infection of any area along the uterine tract could lead to occasional bleeding

-        Cancers - Though only 1 in 10 PMB cases turn out to be cancers, the prognosis improves with early diagnosis and intervention.

Diagnosis: As repeated above, reach out to your doctor if you notice postmenopausal bleeding.  Diagnostic methods could include the following:

-        Physical exam
-        Transvaginal ultrasound
-        Endometrial biopsy
-        Hysteroscopy
-        Dilatation and Curettage
 

Treatment: Needless to say, this would depend on the diagnosis.

For very minor cases with diagnosis like altered hormone levels, no treatment may be required other than modification of the hormone replacement therapy.

For endometrial atrophy and atrophic vaginitis, use of estrogen creams and pessaries would be sufficient.
Polyps would require removal followed by cauterization (application of slight heat) to stop the bleeding.
Cancer - this would depend on the type and location and require a combination of chemotherapy and surgery.  Removal of the uterus also may be required in some cases.
So, if you have had bleeding of any sort after ayear of menopause, do not ignore it.  

Diabetes In Pregnancy - How To Handle It?

Diabetes In Pregnancy - How To Handle It?


'Congratulations! You're pregnant!' Almost all women long to hear these words and nothing should come in the way, even diabetes. So, if you are a Type 1 or Type 2 diabetic, here are a few things you should keep in mind to have a healthy baby.

Your blood sugar must be monitored regularly

The most important thing you can do to have a healthy baby is to keep your blood sugar as close to normal before and during your pregnancy. Testing is recommended a minimum of four times a day. Glucose passes through the mother's blood to the fetus and hence if your blood sugar fluctuates, so will your baby's. High blood sugar levels are especially harmful during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy when the baby's brain, heart, kidneys and lungs are formed.

Your pregnancy is considered high risk

High blood sugar levels can increase the risk of a miscarriage as well as the risks of your baby being born with birth defects. Diabetes can also increase the risk of developing preeclampsia during the second half of your pregnancy. This could result in a C section or premature birth. Thus, maintain regular checkups and keep your doctor in the loop of all your activities.

You should watch out for signs of ketosis

When you have low blood sugar, the body produces ketones that can be passed on from you to your baby. This production of ketones is a result of the body's burning of fat instead of glucose to provide energy and can develop a condition called ketosis. Symptoms you should watch out for are stomach aches, nausea, fatigue, muscle stiffness, frequent urination and fruity breath.

You need Vitamins and Supplements

Most women require vitamin and mineral supplements at the time of pregnancy. Of these, folic acid, iron, calcium and vitamin D are the most important. These supplements help in the healthy growth of the baby.

You should exercise regularly

Maintaining a regular physical activity routine is very important for diabetics who are expecting a baby. This will help you regularize your blood sugar, relieve stress and strengthen your heart. Avoid activities that increase your risk of falling and aim for at least thirty minutes of daily exercise such as walking, swimming or yoga.

Check your medication

Some medication can be detrimental during pregnancy such as cholesterol and blood pressure medication. Consult your doctor to find a suitable alternative, if needed. You may also need to change the kind of insulin you take and its frequency and amount. As you get closer to the delivery date, your insulin requirement may even double or triple.

The key to preventing complications during pregnancy is controlling your diabetes. So take your insulin regularly, maintain regular checkups and eat healthy. You need to be seen by your obstetrician more frequently. Your pregnancy will be monitored closely by more frequent ultrasounds and NST. If your sugar level remains under control and pregnancy is advancing well, a natural onset of pains is aimed for and a normal delivery is expected.

3713 people found this helpful

Fallopian Tubes Blockage - What Can Cause It?

Fallopian Tubes Blockage - What Can Cause It?

It's said that blocked fallopian tubes is the most common cause of female infertility in about 40% women who are infertile. Fallopian tubes are channels through which the egg travels to reach the uterus and blockage of these tubes can put a stop to this from taking place. Depending on the different parts of the tubes, this form of blockage is of several types.

What are the different types of fallopian tube blockages?

1. Proximal tubal occlusion
This form of fallopian tube blockage involves the isthmus (an area of about 2 cm long, this part of the fallopian tube connects the infundibulum and ampulla to the uterus). This problem occurs after an illness like complications associated with abortion, cesarean section, PID (pelvic inflammatory disease).

2. Mid-segment tubal obstruction
It occurs in the ampullary section of the fallopian tube and is most frequently a result of tubal ligation damage. The procedure of tubal ligation is performed to put a stop to pregnancy permanently.

3. Distal tubal occlusion
This is a kind of blockage wherein the section of the fallopian tube that is close to the ovary is affected and is commonly associated with a condition known as hydrosalpinx (a condition in which the fallopian tube is filled with fluid). The latter is often brought on by Chlamydia infection, leading to fallopian tube and pelvic adhesions.

The conditions that may give rise to this problem can include:

1. Genital tuberculosis (the TB infection that occurs in the genital tract)

2. Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy in which the embryo places itself outside the uterus)

3. Tubal ligation removal

4. Complications related to surgery of the lower abdomen

5. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

6. Uterine fibroids (benign growths that occur in the uterus)

7. Endometriosis (development of uterine tissue outside of the organ)

These disorders can lead to the development of scar tissue, adhesions, polyps or tumors to form inside the pathway. Additionally, the tubes can also get stuck to other body parts such as the ovaries, bladder, uterus and bowels. Two things can happen to the fallopian tubes, either they can become twisted or the tubes walls may stick together, leading to a complete blockage. Moreover, even if the fallopian tubes are partially damaged, they can remain open so as to enable pregnancy to occur, while increasing your risk for ectopic pregnancy.
 

3393 people found this helpful

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - How To Diagnose it?

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease - How To Diagnose it?

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease is a common infection in the female reproductive organs like the ovaries, the uterus and the fallopian tubes and also the inside of the pelvis. If left untreated for a long time, PID can lead to severe problems like pregnancy complications, infertility and cancer.

Causes

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD) like chlamydia and gonorrhea produce vaginal bacteria which travel to the interior organs and cause PID. Having unprotected sexual contact with someone who has an STD is the most common cause of PID. Moreover, medical processes like abortion, miscarriage, childbirth, insertion of contraceptive devices can also lead to bacterial infection. Having sex with a number of different people, or having sex before the age of 20, or having had an STD in the past, also increase the chances of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease.

Symptoms

The disease may show only minor symptoms or it may not show any symptom at all. When it does, the common symptoms are pelvic pain, discomfort while urinating or having intercourse, difficulties with menstruation and unusual fluid discharge from the vagina. Associated symptoms of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease include high fever, nausea, vomiting, indigestion, exhaustion, shivering and fainting.

Diagnosis

A pelvic examination is conducted to check for abnormal bleeding from the cervix (the opening of the uterus), fluid discharge or severe pain in the uterus, fallopian tubes or in the ovaries.
Swabs taken from the cervix and the vagina are tested for STDs or other possible bacterial infections that may cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease.
An ultrasound or a Computerized Tomography (CT) scan is conducted to make sure that the symptoms are not being caused by other disorders like appendicitis or other kinds of infection in the reproductive organs.
A pregnancy test is also done to take the necessary precautions to protect the fetus from the adverse effects of the infection.

Treatment

The treatment procedures of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease vary depending on the type of bacteria that caused the infection in the specific case. Antibiotic medication is used to treat the condition. In case of severe complications, the patient has to be hospitalized.

3275 people found this helpful
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