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Dr. Gopal Krishna

Fellowship in AUH, Phd, Phd, Fellowship in Norad, MVSc, BVSc

Veterinarian, Faridabad

54 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
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Dr. Gopal Krishna Fellowship in AUH, Phd, Phd, Fellowship in Norad, MVSc, B... Veterinarian, Faridabad
54 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Gopal Krishna
Dr. Gopal Krishna is one of the best Veterinarians in Bhatia Colony, Faridabad. He has over 54 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He is a Fellowship in AUH, Phd, Phd, Fellowship in Norad, MVSc, BVSc . He is currently practising at German Pet Clinic in Bhatia Colony, Faridabad. Book an appointment online with Dr. Gopal Krishna and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Faridabad and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
Fellowship in AUH - Germany - 1985
Phd - National Dairy Research Institute - 1973
Phd - Norway - 1973
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Fellowship in Norad - Norway - 1973
MVSc - Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly - 1965
BVSc - Mathura University - 1963
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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German Pet Clinic

5 R/1 Near B K Chowk Faridabad Get Directions
500 at clinic
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German Pet Clinic

Shop No. 13, Sainik Colony Market,, Gurgaon-Faridabad Road, Sainik Colony, Sector 49, Faridabad Get Directions
500 at clinic
...more
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For my dog eyes are closing when she will sleep and getup why?Any medicine is there for that problem can you tell me.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Please check if there is any discharge from the eyes? Are the eyes red? Is the dog rubbing eyes with her paws sometimes? Please get her checked from a vet. If i' m getting you right, it could be spasms of the eyelids and may need some topical anti-inflammatory meds. Hope this is helpful.
1 person found this helpful

5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

How can the tumour growing in the Mammary gland of my dog be cured without operation?pls help, as she is 12 yrs old.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As she is 12 years of age, please dont do any surgery and try to maintain it with tablets and let it have happy life and favourite food.
1 person found this helpful
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My lebra have loose motion and he is only 1 month old. We only gives milk him to drink.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should not use milk for feeding. You should use ceralac (samolac) or starter feed. Check for deworming.
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

My parrot ate tomatoes and then his activity reduced and then he is continuously crying and is swollen up from front part baby is not even 20 days please help fast.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My parrot ate tomatoes and then his activity reduced and then he is continuously crying and is swollen up from front ...
It might have blocked in crop region. Try to massage so that it is relived from pain or take it to a vet.
1 person found this helpful
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My labrador puppy is having parvo virus what to do? is there any medicine or injection for him?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
How old is your dog. Best treatment for parvo virus is regular fluid therapy. You can use parvo virus immunoglobulin along with fluids. Antibiotics for prevention of secondary infection.
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My (dog) is 27 months old. Suffering with testis pain (infection) can not even stand properly. And I am using immune syrup two spoons a day. But still pain increasing. Wat is the solution for this and this is the second time facing same problem in two months. Could you pls help our pet. Thanks.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
You need to see vet asap there may be infection which will need to be treatedwith antibiotics by registerd veterinarfy practicaql Done self medicate dogs Immune syrup is for something else it will not help reducing infection Kindly see nearest vet.
1 person found this helpful
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My labra dog is 6 month old and his weight is 28 kg mere dog ko bahut khujali ho rahi he or vo itna khujata he ki vaha se blood nikal aata he please help me.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Khujali means Skin Infection, may be bacterial, fungal, mites tick, lice etc, Pleasedo skin scraping exam, It may be even demodectic mange. Give Ivermecgtin Injeion s/c or its tablet one orally with gruel repeat after 10 days, Give Antihistaminics also. Possibley to give relief, steroids, ointment over the body & orally also. Skin ointment containing, antibacterial, antifungal, antimites are available apply for 10-15 days or more, Itywill give Good results.
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Sir my pet dog just ate a lizard and vomited all it ate, sir he is only 2 months old and I heard that it is very harmful for them, sir pls aay what can I do to help my pet?

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Sir my pet dog just ate a lizard and vomited all it ate, sir he is only 2 months old and I heard that it is very harm...
If your dog has vomited it is fine, no botheration, our domestic lizards are harmless,& cats eat them & even some human beings also do eat that I have noted it does not matter any thing to your dog, be tension free, of course there are poisonous lizards also, even after eating the contents should go to blood to see the symptoms, if your dog has lose motion, give antimalarial medicines, do not worry,
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Hi Sir, Two three people said that after dog bite, we should not give head bath and my daughter (3 yrs. 10 months) should not get cold. Is this true?

General Physician, Lucknow
Hi Sir, Two three people said that after dog bite, we should not give head bath and my daughter (3 yrs. 10 months) sh...
No these are wrong hearsays. Please do not follow them. Immediatley after a dog bite try to wash the wound with mild soap and running tap water.
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Hi, My Lab is 8 years old. And now she has started to Limp on her right leg. I dont know if she is in pain. What should i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Start adult senior diet available in the market for him and give him pet joint capsules each one daily until symptoms subsidise
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Hello My dog is mixed breed of lab and street and is 8 years old this year. Could you please let me know the precautions I should take ? He sheds hair every two months as well. But Is very active and runs a lot.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
For hair do regular brushing once a day and start some nutricoat tonic for hair. As considering age do blood test regular once in year.
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I have a q regarding my dog's health. he is having vomiting since last 15 days. whatever he eats in next moment he throws out. I gave him digene 1 tbspun in a day as prescribed by his doc nd sporolac powder with food also. he is 2.5 years pomerenian. plz guide me what to do next to improve his health.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Please investigate. Vomiting may not a disease in itself, but a sign observed in many diseases. Vomiting (I'll call it as - Regurgitation) for 15 days shouldn't be taken lightly. To start with - you can get a chest and abdomen x ray done - to identify if there is any radio-opaque foreign body, and send blood sample to identify if there is any metabolic involvement. Hope this is helpful.

Now a days my 4 months labrador is feeling weakness in his back legs and when he stood up he feel ache. Suggest remedy. His all vaccination is done and he eats everything.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Feeling weakness is indication abnormal bone growth in growing puppies. It better you should get him complete check from vet. Hip dysplasia is very common problem in labs.
4 people found this helpful
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Hello doctors. My dog is a Labrador. And on some places on his body. Has few hairs. With redness. Specially on his tail. Please give some advice. I am now using wokazole lotion.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Hello doctors.
My dog is a Labrador. And on some places on his body. Has few hairs. With redness. Specially on his ta...
You should check for ticks infestation. Redness indicate mixed microbial infection. Wokazole is good enough for minor infection, but larger area of redness, require systemic antibiotic treatment.
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14-year old Lab with a huge boil on its left hind leg. Since we live in a hill station, far away from a vet, request advice. Thanks

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please rule out cancerous growth with your vet and biopsy . and if it is so never operate as he is of 14 years we can't do much leave it as along as it is . or consult your vet
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
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I have a cat of approximately 3 months and unfortunately it was attacked by a mature cat. It had a small wound in-between its hind limb. The wound has been eliminated however it now has a swelling around that part and as a result it is not able to walk properly, also it is not eating much. Please suggest me some way to get her well soon.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
I have a cat of approximately 3 months and unfortunately it was attacked by a mature cat. It had a small wound in-bet...
You may try giving her Homoeopathic medicine Arnica 200 1 dose every day. And dressing by calendula. And take good care of yourself that you may not get bitten or infected by any means from her.
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