Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Suraj Agarwal

Dentist, Delhi

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Suraj Agarwal Dentist, Delhi
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Suraj Agarwal
Dr. Suraj Agarwal is a trusted Dentist in Bapa Nagar, Delhi. He is currently practising at Suraj Dental Clinic in Bapa Nagar, Delhi. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Suraj Agarwal on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dentists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Suraj Agarwal

Suraj Dental Clinic

G-2, Jeevan Nagar, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Suraj Agarwal

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I have pain in my teeth and swelling from last 3 days how can I get rid from this? Pleasea advise.

MDS- Implantologist, BDS
Dentist, Jaipur
I have pain in my teeth and swelling from last 3 days how can I get rid from this? Pleasea advise.
A clinical examination is must and if it's your affected tooth is wisdom tooth then warm saline rinses would help you temporarily,
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi. I got the retainers today but if I worn both. I couldn't able to talk properly. What to do. Doctor told. If like this I can wear top of the retainer. Is it okay? Mine is night shift. I am having confusion to which time I should wear this. I think sleeping time I should not wear. Kindly help.

BDS, FICOI, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE)
Dentist, Bangalore
Hi. I got the retainers today but if I worn both. I couldn't able to talk properly. What to do. Doctor told. If like ...
If you stop wearing retainers then your treatment will relapse, kindly wear retainers on time, initially you will feel discomfort but as time goes it will adapt to you and you will be fine, my advise to you is you need to have patience since retainers takes time to adapt, initially you feel little discomfort and irritation. But you have to wear it.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I do have half broken front teeth. What treatment should I follow or what are the various option do I need to consider in order to get back my smile. Is there any other option other than replacing my broken teeth with the new one. If yes, then how much it will cost. Kindly suggest me. Thank you.

BDS
Dentist, Delhi
I do have half broken front teeth. What treatment should I follow or what are the various option do I need to conside...
This depends upon the extent of broken part if it is involving nerve then rct will done and then either by composite build-up or crown. Rct-3000, build-up 1500. If not done with build-up then crown r ranges from 3000 to 15000.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 22 years old female having frequent canker sores making me unable to eat and speak its painful what are the causes of these regular canker sores.

BDS
Dentist, Vadodara
Mouth ulcers are usually due to vitamin deficiency or bad digestion. Other causes are tonsils, trauma from teeth, dry mouth, tonsillitis, stress, change in lifestyle, allergies to certain foods and medication, smoking and tobacco chewing, consumption of spicy n hot foods. Start some vitamin supplements. Apply local anaesthetic ointment like dologel. Eat healthy and balanced diet. Increase your water intake. Avoid oilly n spicy food completely.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

BDS
Dentist, Nagpur
Avoid using your teeth other than chewing food.If you use them to crack nuts,remove bottle tops ,or opening packaging,you are risking your teeth for chiping or breaking.......

Dentafix Oral Gyaan

MDS - Periodontics, Certified Implantologist, BDS
Dentist, Chandigarh
Dentafix Oral Gyaan

Munching foods like apples, and pears, carrots or celery after brushing can help in preventing discoloration as they trigger tooth-bathing saliva which helps in keeping the teeth whiter.

8 people found this helpful

BDS
Dentist, Motihari
What's in Your Mouth?
To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally. Here are a few of the elements:

Saliva ? Your mouth and teeth are constantly bathed in saliva. We never give much thought to our spit, but this fluid is remarkable for what it does to help protect our oral health. Saliva keeps teeth and other parts of your mouth moist and washes away bits of food. Saliva contains minerals that strengthen teeth. It includes buffering agents. They reduce the levels of acid that can decay teeth. Saliva also protects against some viruses and bacteria.

Plaque ? Plaque is a soft, gooey substance that sticks to the teeth a bit like jam sticks to a spoon. Like the slime that clings to the bottom of a swimming pool, plaque is a type of biofilm. It contains large numbers of closely packed bacteria, components taken from saliva, and bits of food. Also in the mix are bacterial byproducts and white blood cells. Plaque grows when bacteria attach to the tooth and begin to multiply. Plaque starts forming right after a tooth is cleaned. Within an hour, there's enough to measure. As time goes on, the plaque thickens. Within two to six hours, the plaque teems with bacteria that can cause cavities and periodontal (gum) disease.

Calculus ? If left alone long enough, plaque absorbs minerals from saliva. These minerals form crystals and harden into calculus. Then new plaque forms on top of existing calculus. This new layer can also become hard.

Bacteria ? We have many types of bacteria in our mouths. Some bacteria are good; they help control destructive bacteria. When it comes to decay, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli are the bacteria that cause the most damage to teeth.

How Your Teeth Decay
The bacteria in your mouth need food to live and multiply. When you eat sugary foods, or even starches such as rice, the bacteria use them as food, too. The bacteria then produce acids that can dissolve tooth enamel (outer layer of the tooth).

It's not just candy and ice cream we're talking about. All carbohydrate foods eventually break down into simple sugars. Some of this process begins in the mouth.

Foods that break down into simple sugars in the mouth are called fermentable carbohydrates. These include the obvious sugary foods, such as cookies, cakes, soft drinks and candy. But they also include pretzels, crackers, bananas, potato chips and breakfast cereals.

Bacteria in your mouth turn the sugars in these foods into acids. These acids begin to dissolve the mineral crystals in teeth. The more times you eat each day, the more times your teeth are exposed to an acid attack.

This attack can lead to tooth decay, also known as dental caries or cavities. First, the acid begins to dissolve calcium and phosphate crystals inside a tooth. A white spot may appear on the enamel in this weakened area. But the loss of minerals develops beneath the surface of the enamel. The surface may still be smooth.

At this stage, the tooth can be repaired with the help of fluoride, proteins and minerals (calcium and phosphate) in the saliva. The saliva also helps reduce the acid levels from bacteria that attack the tooth.

Once the decay breaks through the enamel to cause a cavity, the damage is permanent. A dentist must clean out the decay and fill the cavity. Left untreated, the decay will get worse. It can destroy a tooth all the way through the enamel, through the inside dentin layer and down to the pulp or nerve of the tooth. That's why it is important to treat caries at a very early stage, when the process can be reversed.

Types of Decay
Young children can get a type of decay called baby bottle tooth decay or early childhood caries. It destroys enamel quickly. This type of decay is common in children who are put to sleep with a bottle of milk or juice. The bottle exposes the teeth constantly to carbohydrates through the night. Bacteria can grow rapidly and produce acid that decays teeth.

Decay can become worse if the parent does not clean the child's teeth. It can eat through enamel and leave a large cavity in a matter of months.

In older adults, the exposed roots of teeth can develop cavities. This is called root caries. Older adults are more likely to have receding gums caused by years of hard brushing or periodontal disease. They also are more likely to have dry mouth (xerostomia). The decrease in saliva results in less protection of the teeth. This increases the risk of decay. Many common medicines can cause dry mouth. Be sure to ask the doctor or pharmacist if any of your medicines cause dry mouth.

Decay can form beneath fillings or other tooth repairs, such as crowns. Sometimes bacteria and bits of food can slip between the tooth and a filling or crown. This can happen if the filling cracks or pulls away from the tooth, leaving a gap.

Preventing Cavities
Do you or your family members get cavities often? Dental research has found out that certain factors can affect your risk of tooth decay. These factors include:

The current number of decayed or filled teeth
Your fluoride exposure, including fluoride in drinking water, toothpaste and rinses, and fluoride treatments in the dental office
Parents or siblings with dental decay
How well you take care of your teeth
The amount of saliva and the balance of minerals, enzymes and buffering agents it contains
How often and what types of foods you eat (especially fermentable carbohydrates)
Ask your dentist about the best ways to reduce your risks and limit dental decay.

To prevent your teeth from decaying, you can do three things:

Strengthen your teeth's defenses with fluoride, sealants and agents that contain calcium and phosphate ions.
Have your dentist or dental hygienist place sealants on your back teeth.
Reduce the number of bacteria in your mouth.
Fluoride penetrates into teeth. It strengthens them by replacing minerals that acid has removed. The benefits of fluoride to teeth were first discovered in the 1930s. Dentists started to notice that people who drank water that naturally contained fluoride had less tooth decay. In 1945, communities started to add fluoride to water supplies. Adding fluoride to water systems has been the most successful cavity prevention method to date.

In the early 1960s, fluoride also began to be added to toothpaste. This also had a major impact on cavity prevention. Now almost all toothpastes contain fluoride. Everyone should brush with a fluoride toothpaste every day. Dental offices sometimes recommend higher levels of fluoride in toothpastes, gels and mouth rinses for both children and adults.

Sealants are protective coatings placed over the tops of the back teeth ? molars. They block bacteria and acids from sticking in the tiny grooves on the chewing surfaces of these teeth. Sealants can be placed in adults and children. Children can have sealants placed on their permanent molars once they come in, around age 6. Sometimes they are also used on primary (baby) molars. Dentists can put sealants on molars with signs of early decay, as long as the decay hasn't broken through the enamel.

You can never get rid of all the bacteria in your mouth. But you can take steps to control and disrupt the bacteria so they don't attack your teeth:

Brush twice a day.
Floss daily.
Reduce the number of times each day that you consume fermentable carbohydrates.
Some mouthwashes reduce bacteria in your mouth. This can help prevent decay. Chewing sugarless gums, especially those with xylitol, can help reduce the number of bacteria that cause cavities and increase the flow of saliva.

Most importantly, visit your dentist regularly. Then the dentist can find any decay early, when it can be treated and reversed.

My teeth is getting yellow day by day. Do not know how to get rid of it. I brush twice a day with Colgate. At times I get a yellow patch inside my mouth near tonsil area, it vanishes in a few days. Some I said me to use baking soda with lemon on my teeth, does it harm the teeth. Kindly guide me what to do.

BDS
Dentist, Mumbai
My teeth is getting yellow day by day. Do not know how to get rid of it. I brush twice a day with Colgate. At times I...
Dear Amritesh your teeth are getting yellow .you can use baking soda and lime juice paste.but very cautiously because this can harm teeth if used excessively . this yellowishness may be due to poor oral hygiene . you need to improve your oral hygiene and digestion . visit dental surgeon for scaling and polishing .
4 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

When I brush my teeth, it bleeds and sometime I feel sensitivity in my teeth. How it will be cured?

BDS, MDS
Dentist, Jaipur
When I brush my teeth, it bleeds and sometime I feel sensitivity in my teeth. How it will be cured?
Mostly it is because of deposits over teeth surface. Get your teeth cleaned professionally by scaling and polishing. Sensitivity will be taken care of by scaling only. Start using a desensitizing mouth wash and toothpaste.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hii, I have a problem of bad breath and some white layer on my tongue I always do brush.

BDS, MDS - Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Advanced course in maxillofacial sugery
Dentist, Lucknow
Hii, I have a problem of bad breath and some white layer on my tongue I always do brush.
Get scaling polishing done by a dentist than brush twice daily especially at night use betadine mouth wash drink plenty of water use tongue cleaner.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

Dr. Ashok Yadav

MDS - Orthodontics, BDS
Dentist
Dr. Ashok's Dentistree, 
0 at clinic
Book Appointment
87%
(11 ratings)

Dr. Pranav Khanna

BDS
Dentist
Dr Khanna's Dental Clinic, 
100 at clinic
Book Appointment
91%
(102 ratings)

Dr. Shelly

BDS
Dentist
Shri Mahavir Clinic, 
200 at clinic
Book Appointment

Dr. Shruti Malik

MDS - Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics, BDS
Dentist
Malik Radix Healthcare, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
89%
(31 ratings)

Dr. Sundeep Khurana

BDS
Dentist
Dental Options, 
150 at clinic
Book Appointment
90%
(42 ratings)

Dr. Divya Swarup

MDS - Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopaedics, BDS (Implantologist)
Dentist
Braces n Roots, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment