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Dr. Shivi Jaggi

BMC, MSC

Psychiatrist, Delhi

12 Years Experience
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Dr. Shivi Jaggi BMC, MSC Psychiatrist, Delhi
12 Years Experience
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Shivi Jaggi
Dr. Shivi Jaggi is a popular Psychiatrist in Pitampura, Delhi. He has been a practicing Psychiatrist for 12 years. He has completed BMC, MSC . He is currently associated with Dr Jaggi's Clinic in Pitampura, Delhi. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Shivi Jaggi on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
BMC - Cardiff Medical Univasity - 2005
MSC - Cardiff Medical University - 2006
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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282, Rajdhani Enclave, Road Number 44, Pitampura Delhi Get Directions
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How to over come the stress? I work all the day @office. I can't Handel the office pressure.(

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Navi Mumbai
How to over come the stress? I work all the day @office. I can't Handel the office pressure.(
First of all you should follow some basic thing 1. Avoid=hot and cold at time 2. Less the sugar as much as possible if you want to eat sweet take juggery which is black 3. Do not drink water after meal drink at the time of meal sip by sip up to 150 ml 4. Avoid late night sleep 5. Avoid to eat spicy food, besan, bekary food, overeating, junk food. 6. Every 3 day in month eat mung dal and rice for whole day. 7. Sarswatarishta 4 tsp after lunch and dinner 8. Audumbaravleha 2 tsp before lunch and dinner.
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I have a boy friend. He is my closest friend too. But nowadays he ignored me a lot. He also did this. But this time he doesn't want me anymore. I try to forget him. But I can't. As I have very few friends and they are always busy with their boy friends, they can't give me time. I feel so depressed. So lonely. He insults me all the time. I just want to forget him. I disturb him unintentionally. like I call him or text him. Thus I make him angry. Our relationship is 2.6 years old. We r same aged. Sometimes I feel I am a psycho that's why I disturb him and make him angry and day by day I am losing my self-respect. we are not in any kind of physical relationship. Still I can't forget him. Pls help me doctor. Am I a mad?

M.Sc. - Applied Psychology
Psychologist, Coimbatore
Nothing went wrong in your life. At last you have found the true colour of your relationship partner. Just imagine, what would have you done if everything happened after your marriage or after you have a baby. Do not wait for your friends to turn up to your side to spend time for you. Spend your time engaging in any activities. Spend most of your time with family members. Hope and wait for the new and best relationship to turn. Whenever you think of making a call to him or thinking about him, just divert your mind by doing any activities or just watch tv. Make him feel sorry for losing you. Think this repeatedly that you deserve the best in your life.
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Top five mental process that leads to social isolation

MS- Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Top five mental process that leads to social isolation

Top five mental process that leads to social isolation
1 being too self-critical.
2 inability to forgive
3 being inflexible
4 lack of confidence
5 anxiety.

For e. G.I lost somebody close last year and since then feel depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time please help me.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
For e. G.I lost somebody close last year and since then feel depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time plea...
You need to have mind control and meditation and yoga , reading books,listening to music , exercise can all help control your depression or you may need antidepressants. 5 Ways to Fight Depression If you feel depressed, it's best to do something about it — depression doesn't just go away on its own. In addition to getting help from a doctor or therapist, here are 5 things you can do to feel better. 1. Exercise. Take a 15- to 30-minute brisk walk every day — or dance, jog, or bike if you prefer. People who are depressed may not feel much like being active. In addition to getting aerobic exercise, some yoga poses can help relieve feelings of depression. Two other aspects of yoga — breathing exercises and meditation — can also help people with depression feel better. 2. Nurture yourself with good nutrition. Depression can affect appetite. One person may not feel like eating at all, but another might overeat.. Proper nutrition can influence a person's mood and energy. So eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and get regular meals (even if you don't feel hungry, try to eat something light, like a piece of fruit, to keep you going). 3. Identify troubles, but don't dwell on them. Try to identify any situations that have contributed to your depression. When you know what's got you feeling blue and why, talk about it with a caring friend. Talking is a way to release the feelings and to receive some understanding. 4. Express yourself. With depression, a person's creativity and sense of fun may seem blocked. Exercise your imagination (painting, drawing, doodling, sewing, writing, dancing, composing music, etc.) and you not only get those creative juices flowing, you also loosen up some positive emotions. Take time to play with a friend or a pet, or do something fun for yourself. Find something to laugh about — a funny movie, perhaps. Laughter helps lighten your mood. 5.Try to notice good things. Depression affects a person's thoughts, making everything seem dismal, negative, and hopeless. If depression has you noticing only the negative, make an effort to notice the good things in life. Try to notice one thing, then try to think of one more. Consider your strengths, gifts, or blessings. Most of all, don't forget to be patient with yourself. Depression takes time to heal. If you are happy with these answers please click on "useful” link so that I can know my efforts are not wasted. If you want more clarifications please ask me directly and not in open questions session
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If I am smoker so how can I relief from smoking. The problem is I am smoking all the time but if I will somewhere cigrate somewhere then my mind is diverted.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user. I can understand. Tobacco is addictive. Cigarette also contains 4000+ carcinogenic chemicals other than nicotine. Smoking can affect your mouth, throat, lungs, heart, stomach and brain in many ways. Cancer is one among the potential diseases smoking can cause. The best method is to leave it and continue with your will power. There are other methods like Nicotine Replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy combined. Nicotine chewing gums too help as an alternative for cigarettes. But still you will need will power. You may consult a physician or deaddiction therapist or a rehabilitation facility for further advice. You can also opt for online deaddiction therapy. Take care.
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What is the cause of parkinson deseas in women in india. Pl explain in age group 48 to 50 years.

MPTh/MPT
Physiotherapist,
Cause are unknown. Its a degenerative disorder. Symptoms like tremors, difficulty in writing, drooling of saliva, rigidity will be present, difficulty in speech, festinating gait are also seen
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How can I manage multiple work at 8 hours duty? I have more than one boss at my work place. How can I manage them both? Lastly how can I manage stress at my life?

Masters in Clinical Psychology & Certified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Practioner, Certified Neuro linguistic programming Practioner, Masters in Clinical Psychology, Post Graduate Diploma in Child and ADolescent Counselling
Psychologist, Pune
How can I manage multiple work at 8 hours duty? I have more than one boss at my work place. How can I manage them bot...
As a manager or employee, you often have to multitask and manage or work on multiple projects each day. Some projects are short and take just a few hours or days to complete, while others can take months or even years to complete. Managing multiple projects and deadlines at work can be stressful, so it is important to take the time to organize your work and schedule. Prepare your workspace: Organize your desk. Put everything you use daily within close reach. Get rid of those unused stacks of correspondence, brochures and lists that you keep around because you" might need them some day. Prioritize your tasks. This requires coordination with bosses, coworkers and subordinates. Decide what tasks are really important to you, your boss, your team members and your organization. Do them first. Are these tasks that really don't need to be done at all? Get rid of them. Insist on a clear deadline for each task you take on. Plan your work and your time. Poor or nonexistent planning is the greatest cause of missed deadlines and delays. For all but the simplest tasks, develop a work plan before you start. Divide large projects into manageable chunks. Organize your tasks into a logical sequence. Plan your time. If you do your best brain work between 10 a. M. And noon, schedule your hardest task for that time slot. Persevere to complete each task. Once you start a task, stick with it to completion. Don't flit around from task to task. Even if you feel pressured because other important tasks are pending, don't let that pressure distract you. You'll accomplish more in the long run if you take one thing at a time. Push away distractions. During the next work week, pay attention to your major distracters. Do you spend too much time on the phone? Do too many people stop by your desk during a day? Are you" putting out the welcome mat" for people to just stop by and chat? Do you go through your correspondence two or three times before deciding what to do with it? Do you check your e-mail 20 times a day? Analyze those things that are keeping you from accomplishing your tasks, then work to minimize them. Handle correspondence and e-mail just once or twice a day. Working in a matrix organization with multiple bosses can create major challenges: •Work overload. A common refrain in workplaces around the globe is, “I have too much work to do.” Things can be even worse when you have multiple managers on different projects. Each boss may treat you as if you only work for him or her. •Competing demands. Having several bosses can mean competing demands on your time. Whose project gets first priority—especially when every boss believes his or her project should be number one? •Conflicting messages. The more managers you have, the more opportunity there is for conflicting messages. Different bosses have different expectations and methods of communicating, and can unintentionally send conflicting messages. What can you do to manage these challenges? I suggest these four strategies: 1. Be Clear Who Your “Real” Boss Is It’s important to know who your real boss is. Which person do you formally report to? Who does your final performance review? Who makes decisions regarding your compensation? Even in a heavily matrixed environment, just one manager is typically responsible for these tasks. Make sure you are having regular one-on-one meetings at least once a month with your real boss. Use this formal leader as a mentor or coach in dealing with your other managers. 2. Be Open About Your Workload Your bosses don’t know what’s on your plate unless you tell them. Be open about your workload. Share your calendar with all of your managers so they know your schedule. Create a shared document that updates them on each of the projects you’re working on so they see your progress and have a better understanding of your workload. Have quick weekly check-in meetings to stay connected and address any concerns. 3. Set Clear Boundaries on Your Time Constant interruptions are a major time waster. It’s difficult to focus on your projects if your bosses keep coming by to ask questions or make additional requests. Encourage them to use email or text for questions and requests. Block off specific time on your calendar to work on projects. Let your managers know this is sacred time and you should not be interrupted unless it is an emergency. 4. Set Clear Standards for Communication Get your bosses together to develop one set of standards for communication. Do you prefer to get requests through email, text, Outlook tasks, face-to-face, or some other way? What is the expectation for timely response to an email or text—for you and for them? How often will you meet one-on-one? How are you going to report project status? If possible, come up with one way that works for all of your managers so you don’t have to deal with different expectations for communication. Taking Steps to Manage Stress •Track your stressors. Keep a journal for a week or two to identify which situations create the most stress and how you respond to them. Record your thoughts, feelings and information about the environment, including the people and circumstances involved, the physical setting and how you reacted. Did you raise your voice? Get a snack from the vending machine? Go for a walk? Taking notes can help you find patterns among your stressors and your reactions to them. •Develop healthy responses. Instead of attempting to fight stress with fast food or alcohol, do your best to make healthy choices when you feel the tension rise. Exercise is a great stress-buster. Yoga can be an excellent choice, but any form of physical activity is beneficial. Also make time for hobbies and favorite activities. Whether it's reading a novel, going to concerts or playing games with your family, make sure to set aside time for the things that bring you pleasure. Getting enough good-quality sleep is also important for effective stress management. Build healthy sleep habits by limiting your caffeine intake late in the day and minimizing stimulating activities, such as computer and television use, at night. •Establish boundaries. In today's digital world, it's easy to feel pressure to be available 24 hours a day. Establish some work-life boundaries for yourself. That might mean making a rule not to check email from home in the evening, or not answering the phone during dinner. Although people have different preferences when it comes to how much they blend their work and home life, creating some clear boundaries between these realms can reduce the potential for work-life conflict and the stress that goes with it. •Take time to recharge. To avoid the negative effects of chronic stress and burnout, we need time to replenish and return to our pre-stress level of functioning. This recovery process requires “switching off” from work by having periods of time when you are neither engaging in work-related activities, nor thinking about work. That's why it's critical that you disconnect from time to time, in a way that fits your needs and preferences. Don't let your vacation days go to waste. When possible, take time off to relax and unwind, so you come back to work feeling reinvigorated and ready to perform at your best. When you're not able to take time off, get a quick boost by turning off your smartphone and focusing your attention on non-work activities for a while. •Learn how to relax. Techniques such as meditation, deep breathing exercises and mindfulness (a state in which you actively observe present experiences and thoughts without judging them) can help melt away stress. Start by taking a few minutes each day to focus on a simple activity like breathing, walking or enjoying a meal. The skill of being able to focus purposefully on a single activity without distraction will get stronger with practice and you'll find that you can apply it to many different aspects of your life. •Talk to your supervisor. Healthy employees are typically more productive, so your boss has an incentive to create a work environment that promotes employee well-being. Start by having an open conversation with your supervisor. The purpose of this isn't to lay out a list of complaints, but rather to come up with an effective plan for managing the stressors you've identified, so you can perform at your best on the job. While some parts of the plan may be designed to help you improve your skills in areas such as time management, other elements might include identifying employer-sponsored wellness resources you can tap into, clarifying what's expected of you, getting necessary resources or support from colleagues, enriching your job to include more challenging or meaningful tasks, or making changes to your physical workspace to make it more comfortable and reduce strain. •Get some support. Accepting help from trusted friends and family members can improve your ability to manage stress. Your employer may also have stress management resources available through an employee assistance program (EAP), including online information, available counseling and referral to mental health professionals, if needed. If you continue to feel overwhelmed by work stress, you may want to talk to a psychologist, who can help you better manage stress and change unhealthy behavior. Hope I have answered your query, I will be happy to help further. Regards,
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Between tobacco and cigarette, which one is better? I take tobacco sometimes to quit smoking. And I also feel better when take tobacco.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user. You already know, both are equally bad. Both affect different parts of body and incite cancerous cell growth. No comparison between them. Quit both of them. Take care.
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I recently read that researchers believe certain foods might cure Alzheimer’s disease. Is this true? If so, which foods do this and how much would you have to consume to get the benefits?

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
Hi there, I appreciate that you got the courage to have your question answered on a public forum. Dementia can greatly affect a person's relationship to food and eating. The behavioural, emotional and physical changes that take place as dementia progresses can all have an impact upon a person's eating habits and on their intake of food and drink. It is important to do what you can to make sure that the person you are caring for enjoys their food and eats a healthy, balanced diet. As dementia progresses eating can become difficult for some people. However, by making a few changes you can help keep mealtimes as enjoyable and stress free as possible. Proper nutrition is important to keep the body strong and healthy. For a person with Alzheimer's or dementia, poor nutrition may increase behavioral symptoms and cause weight loss. The basic nutrition tips below can help boost the person with dementia's health and your health as a caregiver, too. Provide a balanced diet with a variety of foods. Offer vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products and lean protein foods. Limit foods with high saturated fat and cholesterol. Some fat is essential for health — but not all fats are equal. Go light on fats that are bad for heart health, such as butter, solid shortening, lard and fatty cuts of meats. Cut down on refined sugars. Often found in processed foods, refined sugars contain calories but lack vitamins, minerals and fiber. You can tame a sweet tooth with healthier options like fruit or juice-sweetened baked goods. But note that in the later-stages of Alzheimer's, if loss of appetite is a problem, adding sugar to foods may encourage eating. Limit foods with high sodium and use less salt. Most people in the United States consume too much sodium, which affects blood pressure. Cut down by using spices or herbs to season food as an alternative. People with Alzheimer's or dementia do not need a special diet. As with anyone, eating a well-balanced, nutritious diet is important for overall health. As the disease progresses, loss of appetite and weight loss may become concerns. In such cases, the doctor may suggest supplements between meals to add calories. Staying hydrated may be a problem as well. Encourage fluids by offering small cups of water or other liquids throughout the day or foods with high water content, such as fruit, soups, milkshakes and smoothies. I hope this helps. I wish you a very quick and speedy recovery. Sincerely,
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I am feeling very much mentally ill, I am thinking I'm suffering from anxiety, this constant worrying makes me more ill, I start loosing hope from life feeling very lonely ad exhausted, honestly speaking I don't like this life but afraid of dying please help me out. I want to be happy, happiness is like a dream to me ritright now. I just want to be happy please help.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
I am feeling very much mentally ill, I am thinking I'm suffering from anxiety, this constant worrying makes me more i...
What are you worrying about? If you look too far into the future, you will be scared. Most of what you are scared about does not happen: as I remember in the last count 90% of what we worry about will not happen. In fact if you look back and see from all the worrying you have done so far, has any of those things really happened?! In other words we simply trouble ourselves. There may be another contributor, and that is, if there were any past influences that have made your system prone to worry. You will need to check into your background for that information. When you do find out meet with a counselor and work this out. We have now video counseling and if you are interested I can help you out on that platform. Counseling will help in training you will skills and techniques to cope with the daily challenges in life and will give you a fair chance to manage your life. You must also develop your constitution to make it fit enough to cope with fear, felt many times unnecessarily. You may be taking normal fear and converting it into abnormal fear like anxiety and so on. Take care of the following: Mental stability can be achieved by learning a few skills in handling emotions in an appropriate manner. Stress management skills, which have a lot to do with expressing emotions, will need to be a major part of your recovery program. Emotionally you need the help of a counselor and that will help you tremendously to move from anxiety to normal fear. Please persevere and cooperate through all the support you need and you will come through successfully. Develop your body?s health by physical fitness through exercise, good rest (sleep), and a proper diet. Any way what you need to focus on is to do vigorous exercise of the aerobic kind for the heart?s fitness; meditation for the brain?s fitness; sleep for a well rested mind and body; a sound spiritual well being for good confidence and stability; and a diet with lots of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Vigorous exercise, especially of the callisthenic kind, will make your heart, which is a muscle, grow larger; and then your heart will need to beat less often and you will respond to the anxiety with a calmer disposition. If your mind, constitution, and your emotions are in check and fit, you will never be disturbed again. The earlier you tackle this, the easier it is going to be. You can also take two measures: To slow your heart beat breathe deep and slow into your diaphragm, it utilizes an extra 80% of your lungs to absorb more oxygen. The heart beats faster due to more oxygen requirement and slow breathing also reduces stress.
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BHARAT JYOTI, MRACGP, INCEPTOR, MD-PhD, MD - Psychiatry, FIPS, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief

The 5 Stages of Loss and Grief The stages of mourning and grief are universal and are experienced by people from all walks of life. Mourning occurs in response to an individual’s own terminal illness, the loss of a close relationship, or to the death of a valued being, human or animal.
In our bereavement, we spend different lengths of time working through each step and express each stage with different levels of intensity. The five stages do not necessarily occur in any specific order. We often move between stages before achieving a more peaceful acceptance of death. Many of us are not afforded the luxury of time required to achieve this final stage of grief.

The death of your loved one might inspire you to evaluate your own feelings of mortality. Throughout each stage, a common thread of hope emerges: As long as there is life, there is hope. As long as there is hope, there is life.

Many people do not experience the stages in the order listed below, which is okay. The key to understanding the stages is not to feel like you must go through every one of them, in precise order. Instead, it’s more helpful to look at them as guides in the grieving process — it helps you understand and put into context where you are.

All, keep in mind — all people grieve differently. Some people will wear their emotions on their sleeve and be outwardly emotional. Others will experience their grief more internally, and may not cry. You should try and not judge how a person experiences their grief, as each person will experience it differently.

1. Denial and Isolation

The first reaction to learning of terminal illness or death of a cherished loved one is to deny the reality of the situation. It is a normal reaction to rationalize overwhelming emotions. It is a defense mechanism that buffers the immediate shock. We block out the words and hide from the facts. This is a temporary response that carries us through the first wave of pain.


2. Anger

As the masking effects of denial and isolation begin to wear, reality and its pain re-emerge. We are not ready. The intense emotion is deflected from our vulnerable core, redirected and expressed instead as anger. The anger may be aimed at inanimate objects, complete strangers, friends or family. Anger may be directed at our dying or deceased loved one. Rationally, we know the person is not to be blamed. Emotionally, however, we may resent the person for causing us pain or for leaving us. We feel guilty for being angry, and this makes us more angry.

Remember, grieving is a personal process that has no time limit, nor one “right” way to do it.
The doctor who diagnosed the illness and was unable to cure the disease might become a convenient target. Health professionals deal with death and dying every day. That does not make them immune to the suffering of their patients or to those who grieve for them.

Do not hesitate to ask your doctor to give you extra time or to explain just once more the details of your loved one’s illness. Arrange a special appointment or ask that he telephone you at the end of his day. Ask for clear answers to your questions regarding medical diagnosis and treatment. Understand the options available to you. Take your time.

3. Bargaining

The normal reaction to feelings of helplessness and vulnerability is often a need to regain control–

If only we had sought medical attention sooner…
If only we got a second opinion from another doctor…
If only we had tried to be a better person toward them…
Secretly, we may make a deal with God or our higher power in an attempt to postpone the inevitable. This is a weaker line of defense to protect us from the painful reality.


4. Depression

Two types of depression are associated with mourning. The first one is a reaction to practical implications relating to the loss. Sadness and regret predominate this type of depression. We worry about the costs and burial. We worry that, in our grief, we have spent less time with others that depend on us. This phase may be eased by simple clarification and reassurance. We may need a bit of helpful cooperation and a few kind words. The second type of depression is more subtle and, in a sense, perhaps more private. It is our quiet preparation to separate and to bid our loved one farewell. Sometimes all we really need is a hug.


5. Acceptance

Reaching this stage of mourning is a gift not afforded to everyone. Death may be sudden and unexpected or we may never see beyond our anger or denial. It is not necessarily a mark of bravery to resist the inevitable and to deny ourselves the opportunity to make our peace. This phase is marked by withdrawal and calm. This is not a period of happiness and must be distinguished from depression.

Loved ones that are terminally ill or aging appear to go through a final period of withdrawal. This is by no means a suggestion that they are aware of their own impending death or such, only that physical decline may be sufficient to produce a similar response. Their behavior implies that it is natural to reach a stage at which social interaction is limited. The dignity and grace shown by our dying loved ones may well be their last gift to us.

Coping with loss is a ultimately a deeply personal and singular experience — nobody can help you go through it more easily or understand all the emotions that you’re going through. But others can be there for you and help comfort you through this process. The best thing you can do is to allow yourself to feel the grief as it comes over you. Resisting it only will prolon
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Mai bahut jyada kalpnaye karta hu. Dimag hamesha planning Karta rahta h. Hamesha restless feel Karta hu. Jaldi hopeless ho jata hu. Future ko lekar upset rahta hu. Bhukh khulkar nahi lagti. Sex life enjoy nahi Kar pata. Sex time 1 mint se bhi kum h. Wife se talmel nahi baith pata. Kabhi kabhi apne aap achcha lagne lagta h fir koi negative vichar aa jata h aur mood kharab ho jata h. Jab apne aapko shishe me dekhta hu to kabhi kabhi man me sawal aata h ki mai koun hu. Life bahut uljhi hui lagti h.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Mai bahut jyada kalpnaye karta hu. Dimag hamesha planning Karta rahta h. Hamesha restless feel Karta hu. Jaldi hopele...
Dear user. I can understand. Thinking is a complex mechanism and your mind's job is to think. If you allow you to think without having control over it, it will always wander into negative territories. You should train yourself to keep your thoughts under your control. Cognitive therapy will help you in this case. Take care.
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Hey I am suffering from headache from few days due to stress of study what I hve to do. When I studied my head pain is increase to mch which unable to tolerate.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
Hey I am suffering from headache from few days due to stress of study what I hve to do. When I studied my head pain i...
It is evident that you are having headaches due to stress. This can be relieved by having a relaxing sleep and doing some relaxation exercises like yoga, meditation or some deep breathing exercises. If that does not work it would be advisable that you consult a psychiatrist or a headache specialist for a short course of medication till you get the much wanted relief.
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Actually sometimes I got some mood swings and then suddenly I start feeling nervous irritated fearing and all those related shit. N start hiding myself away from world? please I need help.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
Actually sometimes I got some mood swings and then suddenly I start feeling nervous irritated fearing and all those r...
Hi lybrate-user, Welcome to Lybrate. I understand your problem and I feel you need counseling/therapy for your issues. First and foremost practice mindfulness breathing daily as many times as you can for 10-15 minutes. The primary goal of mindful breathing is simply a calm, nonjudging awareness, allowing thoughts and feelings to come and go without getting caught up in them. Sit comfortably, with your eyes closed and your spine reasonably straight. Bring your attention to your breathing. Imagine that you have a balloon in your tummy. Every time you breathe in, the balloon inflates. Each time you breathe out, the balloon deflates. Notice the sensations in your abdomen as the balloon inflates and deflates. Your abdomen rising with the in-breath, and falling with the out-breath. Thoughts will come into your mind, and that’s okay, because that’s just what the human mind does. Simply notice those thoughts, then bring your attention back to your breathing. Likewise, you can notice sounds, physical feelings, and emotions, and again, just bring your attention back to your breathing. You don’t have to follow those thoughts or feelings, don’t judge yourself for having them, or analyse them in any way. It’s okay for the thoughts to be there. Just notice those thoughts, and let them drift on by, bringing your attention back to your breathing. Whenever you notice that your attention has drifted off and is becoming caught up in thoughts or feelings, simply note that the attention has drifted, and then gently bring the attention back to your breathing. It's okay and natural for thoughts to enter into your awareness, and for your attention to follow them. No matter how many times this happens, just keep bringing your attention back to your breathing.
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I am a bds student so lot of are for studying but I can't remember much more what I am studying. And inside my head sometime a vibration is feeling.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear , the best method to improve your concentration, memory power and recollection etc is to use your brain creatively again and again. Doing number puzzles, creative hobies like painting, games like chess etc can sharpen your brain and improve concentration. Exercise plays an important part in sharpening the brain and in many aspects of memory. Nutritious food including green vegetables, fruits, nuts, cereals and pulses are beneficial. Alcohol, nicotine, drugs, coffee, red meat etc are not that good for sharpening brain and memory power. Being happy and cheerful also contributes positively. The vibration feeling could be due to anxiety and stress. You may ask a private question to me for more information. Take care.
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Sometimes I see future or my upcoming times. Even something I didn't do in my life I felt it I spend this time earlier or I live this time. I can guess what happen in next. Not able to see much, but day by day in increasing. Unable to say anyone, no one believe me. Who am i. And why it happens to me. Is it normal thing? Can everyone feel it? please give me answer.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
Sometimes I see future or my upcoming times. Even something I didn't do in my life I felt it I spend this time earlie...
Hi lybrate-user, you need to discuss details about what you are feeling and seeing. It could be deja vu, whether its normal or some disorder you are suffering will be known after probing into details and assessing what you feel.
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Gum of my one of teeh is receded so much that its roots are now exposed and senstivity can be felt on touching it. I used to eat non smoke tobacco and still often consume it. I will stop eating it can my gum recover, is their any gum transplant to recover it. please advice.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user. There are many treatments available to recover your gum and repair it. You should stop using non smoke tobacco. Take care.
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Sir I am so depressed that I appear for an interview but I was not selected in the interview so sir please give a solution for this.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
Sir I am so depressed that I appear for an interview but I was not selected in the interview so sir please give a sol...
Hi lybrate-user, we all feel little stressed and sad when we are unable to clear interview we had hopes from, but feeling depressed due to not being able to clear one interview is something you should think about. You are young and there are ample of opportunities for you this was not your life's last interview. So be motivated and keep working towards your bright future. I have confidence you will crack the next one. Yes, if there are few things that you feel you lack while giving interview like confidence, be anxious.
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Master of Physical Therapy MPT CARDIO, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Rajkot
Respect for elders; compassion to those who are suffering; dedication to progress. This is the need of society today - sri sri.
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