Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment
Dr. Sanjiv Saxena  - Nephrologist, Delhi

Dr. Sanjiv Saxena

90 (44 ratings)
DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS

Nephrologist, Delhi

34 Years Experience  ·  1000 - 1400 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Book appointment and get ₹125 LybrateCash (Lybrate Wallet) after your visit
Dr. Sanjiv Saxena 90% (44 ratings) DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS Nephrologist, Delhi
34 Years Experience  ·  1000 - 1400 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Reviews
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Sanjiv Saxena
Based in Delhi, Dr. Sanjiv Saxena is a very renowned and successful Nephrology/Renal specialist. If you are having kindey related problems, this is the best doctor to resort to. You can avail his treatment and services at his clinics Pushpawati Singhania Research Institute or Noble Medicare, Janakpuri, at consecutive timings. You may also contact him via call, text or video call. All of these clinics are based in Delhi. He has completed his nephrology education thoroughly. He has completed his MBBS from All India Institute of Medical Sciences in 1984, MD from the same college in 1987 and DNB (Nephrology) again from the very same college in 1990. The services and treatment measures provided by him include kidney dialysis treatment, kidney transplant treatment and planning, kidney stones treatment, lithotripsy process and many more. His goal is to extent informative knowledge and information to his patients in order to keep them well informed so that they get the right diagnosis and treatment at the right time. He aims at making the atmosphere of his clinic calm and comfortable to make the patients feel less scared of the treatment procedures.

Info

Education
DNB (Nephrology) - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 1990
MD - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 1987
MBBS - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 1984
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Sanjiv Saxena

Pushpawati Singhania Research Institute

Press Enclave Marg, Sheikh Sarai IIDelhi Get Directions
  4.5  (44 ratings)
1400 at clinic
...more

Noble Medicare

C-2B/62A, JanakpuriDelhi Get Directions
  4.5  (44 ratings)
1000 at clinic
...more
View All

Consult Online

Text Consult
Send multiple messages/attachments. Get first response within 6 hours.
7 days validity ₹300 online
Consult Now
Phone Consult
Schedule for your preferred date/time
15 minutes call duration ₹500 online
Consult Now
Video Consult
Schedule for your preferred date/time
10 minutes call duration ₹500 online
Consult Now

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Sanjiv Saxena

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Patient Review Highlights

"Prompt" 1 review "Thorough" 1 review "Professional" 1 review "knowledgeable" 2 reviews "Very helpful" 6 reviews "Caring" 1 review

Reviews

Popular
All Reviews
View More
View All Reviews

Feed

Chronic Kidney Disease - 9 Symptoms That Can Help You Detect it

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Chronic Kidney Disease - 9 Symptoms That Can Help You Detect it

What are the functions of the kidney?

The kidneys filter waste and excess fluid from the blood. As kidneys fail, the waste accumulates in the body. The two most important enzymes, which kidney makes are erythropoietin & renin. Erythropoietin are made by the kidneys if there is less oxygen in the blood. It tells the bone marrow to make more red blood cells. So this means there will be more oxygen carried in the blood.

Renin is made by the kidney if there is low blood pressure, low volume of blood, or too low salts in the blood Renin make the blood vessels smaller and tells the adrenal gland to make aldosterone. It also makes a person feel thirsty and all of this makes the blood pressure go up. Since Kidney plays a very important role in the overall functioning of the body, it’s very important to take care of its health.

Let’s have a look on various kind of kidney disease including the one which are chronic:

  1. Kidney stones
  2. Kidney Infections
  3. Glomerulonephritis
  4. Congenital Kidney disease
  5. Diabetic Nephropathy
  6. Hypertensive Nephropathy
  7. Cancer

Now what is Chronic Kidney Disease?

Chronic kidney disease include conditions that damage your kidneys and decrease their ability to keep healthy by doing the jobs listed, if it gets worse, wastes can build to high levels in the blood and make person sick.
Chronic kidney disease is caused by diabetes, high blood pressure and other disorders.

What causes chronic kidney disease?

The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes & high blood pressure which are responsible for up to two third of the cases. Other conditions that affect the kidney are:
1. A group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney’s filtering unit.
2. Inherited disease such as poly cystic kidney disease.
3. Malformation that occur as a baby develop in mother’s womb.
4. Lupus and other disease that affect the body’s immune system.
5. Repeated urinary infections.

What are the symptoms of chronic kidney disease?

1. Feel more tired and have less energy
2. Have trouble concentrating
3. Poor appetite
4. Trouble sleeping
5. Muscle cramping at night
6. Swollen feet and ankles
7. Puffiness around the eyes especially in the morning
8. Dry itchy skin
9. Need to urinate more often, especially at night.

In case of the similar symptoms one needs to get it diagnosed and connect with the physician for good care and treatment. Stay Healthy!

2350 people found this helpful

How Does Managing Diabetes Help Your Kidneys?

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
How Does Managing Diabetes Help Your Kidneys?

Kidneys and Kidney Diseases

The kidneys are organs which aim to filter out huge amounts of blood to produce 1-2 quarts of urine. They also perform the task of filtering out the excessive waste materials from the blood stream.

However, there can be cases when infection enters your bloodstream and affects your kidneys. This can cause serious kidney diseases such as cysts, stones and cancer.

Diabetes: What is it and how does it affect your kidneys?

Diabetes is a condition which is caused when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type 1 Diabetes) or when your body doesn’t react to the insulin in a normal way (Type 2 Diabetes). The sugar in your food cannot be broken down effectively which can result in problems in your kidneys.

The glucose content in your blood causes considerable damage to the filters in your kidneys. The damage in the kidneys can affect the kidney function and obstruct the filtering out of wastes from the blood.

Thus, diabetes could be attributed as a major cause of kidney disease.

Managing Diabetes -

Managing diabetes is crucial to avoid kidney diseases. However, diabetes doesn’t have a proper cure which is why it is even more important to take care of your health in such cases.

Here are a few ways in which diabetic patients can aim to be healthy and prevent kidney diseases:

  1. Quit Smoking - Smoking increases diabetic complications such as nerve damage and heart strokes which can in-turn affect your kidneys’ functions adversely. Hence, it is advisable to quit smoking to keep diabetes under control.

  2. Healthy Meals -  Opt for healthy meals which are balanced and packed with nutrients as they help in increasing the insulin function in your body. Foods such as green leafy vegetables, legumes, fruits and lean meat should be included in your meals.

  3. Engage in Physical Exercise - A diabetic person needs to engage in physical exercise in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Obesity can increase your chances of complications and can be detrimental to your kidneys as well.

2080 people found this helpful

Mineral Metabolic Disorders - What Are Its Effects On Body?

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Mineral Metabolic Disorders - What Are Its Effects On Body?

Did you know that metabolism functions within a scope that goes beyond just maintaining your body weight? This chemical process is also subject to a number of complications and disorders, and can wreck your system without your knowledge. Mineral Metabolic Disorder is one such impediment that can easily corrupt your body and is characterized by an abnormal and unprecedented rise or fall of the level of minerals in the blood. This may result in a number of cardiovascular and bone diseases.

Minerals undoubtedly play an extremely vital role in the proper regulation of the body conditions and aid and abet growth and development. However, under certain (and mostly unforeseen) circumstances, the mineral levels have a propensity to differ substantially from the normal rates and may lead to several disorders. 

Causes:

  1. Mineral metabolic disorders may be genetic in certain cases, being transferred from the parent to the child via genes. 
  2. However, most mineral metabolic disorders are likely to arise as a result of certain clinical conditions pertaining to starvation, excess alcohol consumption,diarrhea and diet disorders. 

Effects: 
The most commonly observed and medically documented complications affecting metabolism as a result of sudden augment or fall in the following minerals are:

  1. Magnesium: hypomagnesaemia 
  2. Calcium: nephrocalcinosis, hypercalcemia, osteoporosiskidney stones, Paget's disease, osteomalaciapseudohypoparathyroidismrickets and hyperparathyroidism
  3. Iron:  hemochromatosis and cirrhosis
  4. Phosphorus: hypophosphatemia, osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, hypoparathyroidism and rickets.
  5. Sodium: hypernatremia and dilutional hyponatremia
  6. Zincnauseaskin rash, diarrhea, and difficulty in wound healing
  7. Copper: Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease
  8. Potassium: Cushing's syndrome(from exposure to high levels of cortisol), Fanconi's syndrome, Bartter syndrome, Addison's disease and kidney disease

The ideal remedy to battle the majority of mineral metabolism disorders is to maintain a healthy lifestyle and follow a proper, filling, and balanced diet. In case the diseases crop as a result of genetic factors, consult your doctor immediately. However, in most cases, proper medication and a wholesome and nourishing food intake is recommended to fight most mineral metabolic diseases.

2132 people found this helpful

Know The Tests That Help You Diagnose Kidney Disease

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Know The Tests That Help You Diagnose Kidney Disease

Early kidney disease does not have definite signs and symptoms. Getting tested is the best way to detect how your kidneys are functioning. It is important for you to get checked for early kidney disease if you carry high-risk factors including diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney problems. Early detection of kidney disease can help slow down its progress and even reverse the damage. Here’s a quick guide to the tests that are used to measure your kidney function:

  1. Blood Tests: 
    • Serum CreatinineCreatinine is a waste product that is excreted because of normal wear and tear in the muscles of your body. If creatinine levels are greater than 1.2, it may be a warning sign that your kidneys are not functioning properly.
    • Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR): How well is your kidney removing wastes and excess fluid from your body? The GFR is a mathematical calculation of kidney function and the lower the GFR, the lower the kidney function. A normal GFR is 90 or above.
    • Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN): The breakdown of protein in the foods you eat is computed by the urea nitrogen value in your blood. A higher BUN value means the kidney is not working right. A normal BUN level is between 7 and 20.

  2. Imaging Tests: 
    • UltrasoundIn order to detect any abnormalities in the size or position of the kidneys, an ultrasound can be done as it would give a much clearer picture
    • CT Scan: Any structural abnormalities and presence of obstructions need to be examined as well.
  3. Kidney BiopsyA thin needle is used to make a small incision in the kidney for microscopic examination. It is done to identify the cause of the disease and assess the amount of damage. This test is needed to select the best treatment option for the patient and know how quickly the disease is progressing.
  4. Urine Tests: 
    • Urinalysis: Microscopic examination of the urine is done or a dipstick test can also be done to detect the presence of any abnormalities like excess protein, blood, bacteria, pus or sugar.
    • Urine Protein: An excess amount of protein in the urine is called as proteinuria and used to measure the levels of protein.
    • Microalbuminuria: A more sensitive dipstick test to detect tiny amounts of a protein called albumin in the urine. This is done for patients with diabetes and high blood pressure.
    • Creatinine Clearance: Comparison of the creatinine levels in the blood and urine is done to show how much of waste the kidney is filtering out.

Be well-informed of all the diagnosis that can be done for kidney disease. Prevention is better than cure, so get your kidneys tested periodically to stay healthy. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1997 people found this helpful

Effective Ways To Reverse Kidney Damage!

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Effective Ways To Reverse Kidney Damage!

Many of us take the role our kidneys play in keeping us healthy and sturdy for granted. Having your kidneys work well can go a long way keeping you in good shape. You can delay the progression of kidney disease and potentially prevent permanent damage to your kidneys. Here are some things that should be kept in mind in order to protect your kidneys:

  1. Keep your blood sugar and blood pressure in target range: High blood sugar and high blood pressure levels harm the nephrons in your kidneys and prevent them from functioning well. So, get tested periodically to monitor your levels. Improving them and keeping them under the target range will help to prevent further complications.
  2. Get moving: Being active will get your blood pumping and thereby, boost blood flow to your kidneys. It helps your heart to be fit too. So for your body, exercise is a win-win. It can help to slow the rate of chronic kidney disease. Keep a goal to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity each day.
  3. Eat less proteinIt is good to avoid protein rich foods as they can stress the kidneys and lead to unnecessary problems. It is important to consume the right amount of protein in your diet and stay away from meat rich in proteins.
  4. Don’t drink soda: Studies have found a positive link between excessive soda drinking and kidney damage. Two or more diet sodas a day can lead to damage and make it progress quicker.
  5. Balance your blood pH levels: When the kidneys don’t function right, they fail to keep the acid balance in your body. A low acid diet with natural veggies will help the kidneys to last longer and restronger. Also, sodium bicarbonate can help protect your kidneys by neutralizing the acid content of your blood. You can mix a teaspoon of baking soda with a glass of water and consume it regularly. Consult with your doctor about it.
  6. Skip canned foods and processed foods: Stick with natural foods and avoid the artificial foods of fast-food joints, ready-made foods and more as they can contain high levels of sodium and other chemicals that deter the kidney function.
  7. Avoid painkillers: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can cause kidney damage. Since kidneys need a strong blood flow to function well, certain painkillers reduce blood flow and make things worse if you have kidney disease.
  8. Antioxidants to flush out toxins: Consider taking antioxidant foods that can help kidney function and protect your cells.

Follow the above tips and prevent your kidneys from damage to lead a happier and healthier life. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2041 people found this helpful

Renal Failure - 3 Best Treatments!

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Renal Failure - 3 Best Treatments!

When your kidney function falls below a certain point, it is referred to as a kidney failure or renal failure. Fortunately, you can still continue to lead a normal life with the right treatment for renal failure. Here are the three best treatments that you can choose depending on your condition and lifestyle:

1. DialysisDialysis is the process that takes over the function of your kidneys to filter out the waste from your blood and maintain the proper balance of chemicals in the blood. You may use dialysis for many years or as a short-term treatment while waiting for a kidney transplant. Dialysis is not a cure for kidney disease, rather it helps you deal with renal failure. It is life-saving and without it, the kidneys will no longer function.

There are two types of dialysis treatments that you can choose from:

  • Hemodialysis – This type uses a machine to remove waste from the blood and sends it back to your body. It can be done at home or at a dialysis center.
  • Peritoneal Dialysis – This type uses the lining of your belly called the Peritoneum to do the work of your kidneys. A catheter and dialysis solution is used to carry out the function.

There are benefits and complications for each type of dialysis. The treatment decision will largely depend on the patient’s illness and their past medical history. Discuss with your doctor to decide the best option for you.

2. Kidney Transplant: Kidney transplants can provide a better quality of life than dialysis and can be seen as a potential cure for kidney failure. A healthy kidney from a live donor or deceased donor is surgically placed in your body as a replacement to the failed kidneys. Although this may be a better option for you, it has certain shortcomings. There is an element of rejection and you may have to wait for a long time to get a donor. Extensive testing and anti-rejection medications are prescribed with this treatment.

3. Palliative CareRather than cure, it is the care that people with serious illness need. With so much to deal with, the patients have an array of tough questions and challenges to deal with. Patients need to take into account all medical options and care options based on their condition and severity of the renal failure.

Making the right treatment choice is difficult and that too when you are ill. It is normal to be fearful and worried about the risks involved. Get support from your family and doctor to help you make the right treatment choice. It may also be helpful to visit a dialysis or transplant center to talks to others who have been through these treatments.

2192 people found this helpful

How Ulcer In Urinary Bladder Can Be Treated?

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
How Ulcer In Urinary Bladder Can Be Treated?

Hunner's ulcers, simply put are painful ulcers in your urinary bladder. These ulcers are inextricably linked to another disorder called the painful bladder syndrome or intestinal cystitis. They occur in 10 to 15 percent of people with interstitia cystitis. These, in fact, are red patches or lesions on the bladder wall which can stiffen tissue and cause reduced bladder capacity. Hunner’s ulcers bleed, ooze pus and can be of different sizes. The ulcers in the bladder can be extremely painful and uncomfortable.

These are called Hunner’s ulcers because they were first described by Dr. Guy LeRoy Hunner, a Johns Hopkins gynecologist, in 1915. Since Hunner’s ulcers are seen only in people with intestinal cystitis, it’s important to know more about this painful life-altering bladder disorder before we can even understand how to deal with them.

Interstitial cystitis (IC)
IC is also called painful bladder syndrome. Another important thing to know about IC is that it strikes more women than men. IC is a chronic disorder and there’s no cure for it. It causes recurring bouts of pain and pressure in the urinary bladder and the pelvic area. This is often accompanied by an urgent and frequent need to urinate. Sufferers may have to rush to the ‘loo’ as much as 40, 50, or 60 times a day.

Diagnosis
Hunner's ulcers can only be accurately diagnosed by doing a cytoscopy which involves inserting a fibre-optic tube through the urethra to look at the bladder wall closely. During this procedure, a tissue sample from the bladder wall is usually also taken to rule out bladder cancer. Cytoscopy is usually done with hydrodistention under local anesthesia. This involves filling the bladder with a liquid for stretching it to provide a closer view of the bladder wall. Usually, a urologist performs this surgery along with a gynaecologist. IC and also Hunner’s ulcers are both a diagnosis of exclusion. This means that they’re diagnosed only after a number of other conditions have been ruled out.

Hence, the urologist will first take your thorough medical history, followed by a physical exam and a pelvic exam for women patients and perform tests for ruling out infection, and other disorders like bladder stones and cancer, kidney disease, multiple sclerosis, endometriosis, sexually transmitted diseases amongst others. Only after these tests are inconclusive or uncertain and if there is blood in urine, will the urologist go for cystoscopy.


Treatment
There's no cure for IC, but Hunner’s ulcers can be cured by burning them off the bladder wall. Called fulguration, the process uses electricity or laser to burn the ulcers on the bladder wall. Resection is also used in which skin from around the Hunner’s ulcer is cut for removing both the ulcer and the inflamed tissue around it. The problem is that ulcers may recur in the same location.
So, managing IC becomes critical. Your doctor can try to treat the patient with one treatment or with a combination of treatment depending on the condition of the patient.

Pain medicines are the first line of treatment to manage Hunner’s ulcers and IC both, and many patients do go in for this. Patients also find relief by modifying their diet to remove foods and drinks like caffeinated beverages- tea, coffee, colas etc. Sodas, artificial sugars and fruit juices, especially Cranberry juice can trigger intense pain and discomfort, so these are usually contraindicated. Another important aspect is patient education about normal bladder function and tips on self-care and behavioural modifications like stress control to manage Hunner’s ulcers. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

 

1871 people found this helpful

High Blood Pressure - How It Can Affect Your Kidneys?

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
High Blood Pressure - How It Can Affect Your Kidneys?

Roll up your sleeves for a blood pressure check to know how well your kidney is doing. High blood pressure is the leading cause of kidney disease. Therefore, it is important to monitor your blood pressure regularly. Let’s understand the connection between high blood pressure and kidney disease by knowing about them in detail.

What is high blood pressure?
It is the force of the blood that pushes against the blood vessel walls when the heart pumps blood. High blood pressure, also called hypertension, is an increase in the force of blood as it moves through the body. The first number is the systolic pressure that indicates the pressure as the heart beats and pushes blood through the blood vessels. The latter number is the diastolic pressure, which indicates the pressure as the blood vessels relax between each heartbeat. A high blood pressure is one where the systolic pressure measures 140 or above and the diastolic pressure measures 90 or above.

How do kidneys work?
Each kidney is made of millions of filtering units called nephrons. These nephrons constitute a filter called glomerulus and a tubule. The glomerulus allows fluid and waste products to pass through it and prevents blood cells and large molecules from passing. The filtered fluid then passes again through the tubule, which removes waste and sends the nutrients back to the blood stream. The waste products are excreted in the form of urine.

How does high blood pressure affect your kidneys?

The nephrons in the kidneys are surrounded and supplied with a dense network of blood vessels. Each nephron receives blood supply through tiny hair-like capillaries, which constitute the smallest of all blood vessels.

When there is an uncontrolled high blood pressure and an increased blood flow, it tends to narrow, weaken or harden the arteries. Without enough blood supply through the damaged arteries, the nephrons do not get enough oxygen and nutrients. As a result, the kidneys lose their ability to filter blood and remove wastes. The small blood vessels of the kidney are more prone to damage due to high blood pressure.

Healthy kidneys release a hormone called renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, which regulates the blood pressure and is responsible for maintaining the level of sodium and water in the body, which eventually controls blood pressure and enables you to lead a healthy life. On the contrary, damaged kidneys fail to regulate the pressure of blood in the body which further results in even high blood pressure and contributes to the damage in a spiral way. Kidney failure due to high blood pressure is a progressive process. However, you can act now by managing your blood pressure levels and lead a healthy life.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2032 people found this helpful

10 FAQs You Must Know About Kidney Diseases!

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
10 FAQs You Must Know About Kidney Diseases!

Having a kidney disease can make it feel as if your life has spun out of control. But having some knowledge about your kidney disease can save you the stress and trauma that you might experience. Knowledge about the same can also help you take better control over your condition. Here are some frequently asked questions about kidney diseases:

1. How do you know if you are at the risk for kidney disease?
Some basic things are to be monitored to keep away from the risk:

  • Blood pressure levels to be monitored at least once a year
  • Urine analysis to check protein levels
  • Creatinine level in your blood

2. What can we do to take care of our kidneys?
The most important thing is to ensure that your blood pressure and blood sugar are under control. Essential lifestyle changes can help keep your kidneys working longer.

3. How long can I live with Kidney disease?
Many people think that if their kidneys fail, it is the end of their life. But with modern advances in health care, this is not the case. How long you live depends on age, your overall health and how involved you are in your care. Even if you reach kidney failure you can continue to live for a long time with dialysis or kidney transplants.

4. What can be done for fatigue when you have kidney disease?
Fatigue is a common symptom of kidney disease, but there are medications to deal with it. Talk to your doctor to assess your condition and deal with it.


5. Is kidney disease hereditary?
Genetical factors can contribute to kidney disease and around 10% of kidney failures are caused by hereditary factors.

6. Do I need dialysis?
If your kidneys don’t perform their function and the serum creatinine levels reach a certain point, dialysis can be done. The dialysis machine will take over the kidney function of filtering out the impurities from your blood.

7. How long can you stay on dialysis while waiting for a transplant?
There is no set upper limit for the amount of time spent on dialysis. Some patients have gone over 25 years and it all depends on your health condition.

8. What questions should I ask my doctor?
No two people are same. Asking questions is the best way to find where you stand. So, discuss with your doctor on what percent of kidney function you have and what can be done to improve.

9. Can Dialysis be done at home?
Yes, discuss with your doctor to know how it can be done and whether it is good for you.

10. Do kidney stones lead to kidney disease?
No, they don’t lead to kidney failure. But long term obstruction of the kidney can cause kidney failure.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2037 people found this helpful

Ulcer In Urinary Bladder - How They Can Be Treated?

DNB (Nephrology), MD, MBBS
Nephrologist, Delhi
Ulcer In Urinary Bladder - How They Can Be Treated?

Hunner's ulcers, simply put are painful ulcers in your urinary bladder. These ulcers are inextricably linked to another disorder called the painful bladder syndrome or intestinal cystitis. They occur in 10 to 15 percent of people with interstitia cystitis. These, in fact, are red patches or lesions on the bladder wall which can stiffen tissue and cause reduced bladder capacity. Hunner’s ulcers bleed, ooze pus and can be of different sizes. The ulcers in the bladder can be extremely painful and uncomfortable.

These are called Hunner’s ulcers because they were first described by Dr. Guy LeRoy Hunner, a Johns Hopkins gynecologist, in 1915. Since Hunner’s ulcers are seen only in people with intestinal cystitis, it’s important to know more about this painful life-altering bladder disorder before we can even understand how to deal with them.

Interstitial cystitis (IC)
IC is also called painful bladder syndrome. Another important thing to know about IC is that it strikes more women than men. IC is a chronic disorder and there’s no cure for it. It causes recurring bouts of pain and pressure in the urinary bladder and the pelvic area. This is often accompanied by an urgent and frequent need to urinate. Sufferers may have to rush to the ‘loo’ as much as 40, 50, or 60 times a day.

Diagnosis
Hunner's ulcers can only be accurately diagnosed by doing a cytoscopy which involves inserting a fibre-optic tube through the urethra to look at the bladder wall closely. During this procedure, a tissue sample from the bladder wall is usually also taken to rule out bladder cancer. Cytoscopy is usually done with hydrodistention under local anesthesia. This involves filling the bladder with a liquid for stretching it to provide a closer view of the bladder wall. Usually, a urologist performs this surgery along with a gynaecologist. IC and also Hunner’s ulcers are both a diagnosis of exclusion. This means that they’re diagnosed only after a number of other conditions have been ruled out.

Hence, the urologist will first take your thorough medical history, followed by a physical exam and a pelvic exam for women patients and perform tests for ruling out infection, and other disorders like bladder stones and cancer, kidney disease, multiple sclerosis, endometriosis, sexually transmitted diseases amongst others. Only after these tests are inconclusive or uncertain and if there is blood in urine, will the urologist go for cystoscopy.


Treatment
There's no cure for IC, but Hunner’s ulcers can be cured by burning them off the bladder wall. Called fulguration, the process uses electricity or laser to burn the ulcers on the bladder wall. Resection is also used in which skin from around the Hunner’s ulcer is cut for removing both the ulcer and the inflamed tissue around it. The problem is that ulcers may recur in the same location.
So, managing IC becomes critical. Your doctor can try to treat the patient with one treatment or with a combination of treatment depending on the condition of the patient.

Pain medicines are the first line of treatment to manage Hunner’s ulcers and IC both, and many patients do go in for this. Patients also find relief by modifying their diet to remove foods and drinks like caffeinated beverages- tea, coffee, colas etc. Sodas, artificial sugars and fruit juices, especially Cranberry juice can trigger intense pain and discomfort, so these are usually contraindicated. Another important aspect is patient education about normal bladder function and tips on self-care and behavioural modifications like stress control to manage Hunner’s ulcers.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2002 people found this helpful
View All Feed