Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Richa Bhatia

MPTh/MPT

Physiotherapist, Delhi

9 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Richa Bhatia MPTh/MPT Physiotherapist, Delhi
9 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed

Personal Statement

Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Richa Bhatia
Dr. Richa Bhatia is an experienced Physiotherapist in Greater Kailash 1, Delhi. She has over 9 years of experience as a Physiotherapist. She is a MPTh/MPT . She is currently associated with QI Spine Clinic - Greater Kailash in Greater Kailash 1, Delhi. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Richa Bhatia on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Physiotherapists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Physiotherapists with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. We will help you find the best Physiotherapists online in Delhi. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MPTh/MPT - Faridabad Institute of Technology Manav Rachna - 2009
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Richa Bhatia

QI Spine Clinic - Greater Kailash

R-75, R Block, Hans Raj Gupta Marg, Greater Kailash Part-1Delhi Get Directions
500 at clinic
...more
View All

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Richa Bhatia

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I have slightly pain in my lower back when I lift heavy items or maintain posture in one position for prolong. I have gone through MRI. THE REPORT SAYS THAT THERE IS SMALL LEFT PARACENTRAL POSTERIOR PROTRUSION IS SEEN AT T12-L1. THIS IMPINGES THE THECAL SAC CAUSING NO SIGNIFICANT SPINAL STENOSIS.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I have slightly pain in my lower back when I lift heavy items or maintain posture in one position for prolong. I have...
This is a general low back ache and for this you can follow these measures: one keep a pillow right under the knee while sleeping, next is you can keep ice in the painful area for about 5--10 minutes, if pain still persists you can stretch your body by twisting the waist on both sides how we used to do in the school drill similarly you can try which will help you relax as well will reduce the pain. It looks like you are anaemic. If you have back pain after you sit for long hours then it is due to your haemoglobin levels as it is important to check that. Anaemia always leads to the symptoms of being tired and also having back / leg pain though there may not be any pathologicalreasons for back pain. If you have leg pain then you have to rule out the casues for having leg pain. Firstf all check your weight and your haemoglobin levels, as Anaemia always leads to the symptoms of being tired and also having leg pain though there are no issues with the knee joint or back pain. If not if the pain radiates down the back of thigh and legs then it might be due to sciatica. Kindly consult the nearby physiotherapist. Hope you recover soon from the leg pain. Physiotherapy treatment:Ift and swd can be done for localized pain.Ift and traction can be done if you have radiating pain. •Standing hamstring stretch: Place the heel of your injured leg on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your knee straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you do not roll your shoulders and bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •Cat and camel: Get down on your hands and knees. Let your stomach sag, allowing your back to curve downward. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Then arch your back and hold for 5 seconds. Do 3 sets of 10. •Quadruped arm/leg raise: Get down on your hands and knees. Tighten your abdominal muscles to stiffen your spine. While keeping your abdominals tight, raise one arm and the opposite leg away from you. Hold this position for 5 seconds. Lower your arm and leg slowly and alternate sides. Do this 10 times on each side. •Pelvic tilt: Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Tighten your abdominal muscles and push your lower back into the floor. Hold this position for 5 seconds, then relax. Do 3 sets of 10. •Partial curl: Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor. Tighten your stomach muscles. Tuck your chin to your chest. With your hands stretched out in front of you, curl your upper body forward until your shoulders clear the floor. Hold this position for 3 seconds. Don't hold your breath. It helps to breathe out as you lift your shoulders up. Relax. Repeat 10 times. Build to 3 sets of 10. To challenge yourself, clasp your hands behind your head and keep your elbows out to the side. •Gluteal stretch: Lying on your back with both knees bent, rest the ankle of one leg over the knee of your other leg. Grasp the thigh of the bottom leg and pull that knee toward your chest. You will feel a stretch along the buttocks and possibly along the outside of your hip on the top leg. Hold this for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •Extension exercise: Lie face down on the floor for 5 minutes. If this hurts too much, lie face down with a pillow under your stomach. This should relieve your leg or back pain. When you can lie on your stomach for 5 minutes without a pillow, then you can continue with the rest of this exercise.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My left knees started paining last ,2 weeks. What precautions should I take to future.

BHMS, MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Delhi
My left knees started paining last ,2 weeks. What precautions should I take to future.
At the age of 35 you should avoid types of rich protein diets.for eg : rajma , bhindi, rice, gobhi matar(peas), etc etc Also mild exercises would help. Also avoid sitting with crossed legs
Submit FeedbackFeedback

She suffering from knee pain. Doctor said to do operation or injection because of no gel I'm knee. The knee is weak. So before that I need a suggestion.

MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
She suffering from knee pain. Doctor said to do operation or injection because of no gel I'm knee. The knee is weak. ...
Avoid squatting- quadriceps exercises- lie straight, make a towel role and put it under the knee, press the keen against the role, hold it for 20 secs. Repeat 20 times twice a day. This will help relieve some pain.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have severe pain in right leg and right hip I cannot walk or stand for long can you tell me medicine my age is 36.

D.A.M.S( A. M.), D.AC/B.E.M.S
Acupressurist, Mumbai
I have severe pain in right leg and right hip I cannot walk or stand for long can you tell me medicine my age is 36.
You should take Acupressure therapy and take Biochamic Mag phos 200x +Nat mur 200x 4 tab each thrice a day with warm water and take it 5 days and consult private online.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Cervical spondolysis ka problem hone se kya sir dard or chakkar, imbalance ho skta h kya.

MPT - Orthopedic Physiotherapy, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
Cervical spondolysis ka problem hone se kya sir dard or chakkar, imbalance ho skta h kya.
Yes. Hot fermentation twice a day neck stretching exercises and avoid toward bending. Otherwise meet physiotherapist.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

PHD
Doctor, Delhi
5 Ways Stress Hurts Your Body, and What to Do About It

Where are you storing emotions in your body?

Have you noticed a painful knot in your neck muscles after a stressful week?
When you hear a song that reminds you of a difficult breakup, do your hands clench or shoulders automatically tighten? Have you taken a hip-opener yoga class and wondered why you were filled with strange emotions afterwards?
Our minds carry our emotional stress, but so do our bodies. The physical clues we experience could be telltale signs of emotional memories. 

Neuroscientists often report that the amygdala or limbic system in the brain stores human emotions and memory. But, the brain is not the only place where your emotions are stored. Your body holds onto your past, too.
Our body is our subconscious mind. Our physical body can be changed by the emotions we experience.?
Research reveals the integrated physiology behind emotion-body connection: 

?A feeling sparked in our mind-or body-will translate as a peptide being released somewhere.
[Organs, tissues, skin, muscle and endocrine glands], they all have peptide receptors on them and can access and store emotional information. This means the emotional memory is stored in many places in the body, not just or even primarily, in the brain. You can access emotional memory anywhere in the peptide/receptor network, in any number of ways. I think unexpressed emotions are literally lodged in the body. The real true emotions that need to be expressed are in the body, trying to move up and be expressed and thereby integrated, made whole, and healed.?

Modern scientific research is still trying to figure out the impact of emotions on the body.
How we experience emotions in the body. Participants were instructed to color where they actively experienced the emotion in their body,ranging from love to shame.
Anger and pride fire up the head, neck, and shoulders. Love and happiness fill nearly the entire body, especially the heart. Anxiety and fear activate the chest, an area where people with panic attacks often feel tightness. Depression deactivates most of the body, especially the limbs, consistent with the sensation of heavy limbs that many people with depression experience.
Creative Commons
The bodily experience of emotions is nearly instantaneous.
We feel within the first few seconds of a negative emotion, people automatically tense the muscles in their jaw and around the eyes and mouth. Neurophysiologists explain that with repeated stress, people over time have shorter and shorter neck and shoulder muscles.
We can found that people with depression had chronically tight brow muscles (corrugator muscles) even when they did not think they were frowning. Multiple studies indicate that an increased mental workload results in increased muscle tension in the cervical and shoulder areas, particular in people working at computers.
Muscle tension can lead to chronic pain, knots, and spasms.We can notice that muscle tension decreases blood flow, leading to lower oxygen delivery, lactic acid buildup, and the accumulation of toxic metabolites. Shortening of the muscle fibers can also activate pain receptors. Lack of movement can further reduce blood flow and oxygenation. 
What can we do to prevent the storing of negative emotions in our tense muscles? Take a moment to see where you might be storing stress in your body. Every body is unique, and our bodies change day to day. Notice where you hold onto different emotions in your body, and kickstart the process of releasing these negative emotions with the first step-- giving your body attention and awareness. Here are some common areas of tension:

1. Jaw- Emotions like anger and stress can cause clenching of the jaw and muscles around the mouth.

What to do: Release the jaw by a simple Lion?s breath (link is external) (or if you?re in an open office, you try yawning or sighing with an open mouth)

2. Brow- Feeling down or worried can cause you to knit your brow without even realizing it.

What to do: Release your forehead by raising and lowering your eyebrows 2-3 times. Also, inhale deeply while closing and squinting your eyes tightly, and then exhale while you release the tension and open your eyes.

3. Neck- If you are constantly looking down at papers or at a computer, your neck may be angled in one position for an extended period of time without any movement, causing lower blood flow to your neck muscles. It shows that when mental workload increases, the cervical area feels the effects.

What to do: Bring back blood flow to your neck muscles by rolling your head gently from one side to the other, and then changing directions. Avoid holding your neck in one position for long periods of time.

4. Shoulders- The trapezoid muscle of your shoulders holds up your head, which weighs around 5 Kg.
If you have a sitting desk or computer job, you are likely not moving your shoulders regularly, which can create knots and muscle spasms in the trapezoids.
Increased mental workload directly results in physical tension in the arm and shoulders.

What to do: With an inhale, lift your shoulders to your ears. Exhale and draw your shoulders down and back, guiding the shoulder blades towards each other and downwards.

5. Hips- Most people don?t automatically associate hips with emotions. But hips as storing negative emotions (link is external) hips can lead to an unexpected release of emotions. While there is little possibility that can shed light on the relationship between negative emotions and hips, one study (link is external) has shown an interesting connection between the jaw and hips.
After tension of the temporomandibular joint was released, the range of motion of the hip significantly increased.
22 people found this helpful

I am suffering from knee pain. Please give me information to avoid from this pain!

Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), MBBS
Orthopedist,
I am suffering from knee pain. Please give me information to avoid from this pain!
Avoid squatting & lifting heavy wieght lifting, try to loose your weight upto 25 kg. Then you will get relief from knee pain.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello, i, m 24 year old male. My problem is that I had an accident of my right knee before 4 year and my acl and meniscus (both are of 3rd degree) got tear. And right now im very busy in my job so I can not go for surgery. But after 8 moths I will make my surgery done. So I want to know that is there any problem in delaying the surgery?

BHMS
Homeopath, Hooghly
Hello, i, m 24 year old male. My problem is that I had an accident of my right knee before 4 year and my acl and meni...
Don't walk too much. Don't stand for long. Do not change your posture too quickly. Do not sit in the floor. Walk slowly. And by homoeopathic treatment this can b relieve.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My tibia bone has been fractured. I operated intramedullary nail fixing. At how much time I can run or go to the gym?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
It usually takes 3 months for bones to unite.After that you must do physiotherapy to get normal joint mobility.When you join gym. yo should increase your stamina gradually.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Spondilosis is curable by medicines? Very small, (like hair ) gap is there between c6-c7.

Vaidya Visharad
Sexologist, Narnaul
Dear, According to Ayurveda this condition is known as Griva Sandhigata Vata. Pain in the back of neck, shoulder and arms, stiffness of the neck and even paraplegia occur due to this condition. The movement of the spine generally aggravates the pain of the neck. It is often associated with loss of memory and sleeplessness. Visit us at www.Malhotraayurveda.Com
1 person found this helpful
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

90%
(18 ratings)

Dr. Gaurav Mohan

MPTh/MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist
Physio Hut, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
87%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Aneeta Verma

Wellness Diploma, MBA (Healthcare), BPTh/BPT, Post Graduate Specialization In Preventive Health Care
Physiotherapist
Eva Physiotherapy & Wellness Clinic, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
85%
(22 ratings)

Xcell Physiocare

MSPT (Master of Physical Therapy)
Physiotherapist
Xcell Physiocare, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
85%
(61 ratings)

Dr. Jeetu Mishra

Bachelor of Physiotherapy
Physiotherapist
Acctive & Fit Chiropractic & Physiotherapy Centre, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
89%
(46 ratings)

Dr. Hemant Gaur

MPT, Mphill
Physiotherapist
Advance Physiotherapy & Sports Injury Centre, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
85%
(40 ratings)

Total Healthsums

Physiotherapist
Total Healthsums, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment