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Dr. Ranjeet Jha

Veterinarian, Delhi

Dr. Ranjeet Jha Veterinarian, Delhi
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I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Ranjeet Jha
Dr. Ranjeet Jha is a renowned Veterinarian in Lajpat Nagar, Delhi. He is currently practising at Dr. Ranjeet Jha's Clinic in Lajpat Nagar, Delhi. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Ranjeet Jha on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Mere dog ko kafi khujli Ho thi hai or uske puri body par red nissan ho gaye hai meine uske body or red liquid dawai bhi Lagai thi par firse Ho gaye hai.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Medicated shampoos weekly injection course right food application of medicines on body plus tablets will be given as per the situatuon. Go to a vet
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Question specifically for a veterinarian but open to all. Post exposure rabies vaccination in injured pet cat, bitten by unknown animal (probably by stray dog), with visible bite mark injuries on back, resulting in paralysis of the the rear section of the cat (hind legs dragging) due to fracture of the spinal chord. My cat (female, 4 years) old was bitten on April 14th 2016 by an unknown animal (the vet in my place India suspected it to be a dog). She was pregnant at the time of injury. The cat was vaccinated (rabies vaccine CANVAC® R) given in last January and February 2015, I took the cat in a jute sack to the veterinarian and his assistant ,however, injected the vaccines both the times through the sack, however he said to me that he was sure that the vaccines were injected successfully. The cat however missed the scheduled anti rabies booster dose in Feb 2016. Actually the cat it belonged to my aunt residing near my house but somehow she came to our place, however at night she always stay outside like a free roaming cat. Two months back (possibly nite of April 14th 2016) the injury took place and we found her in our garage dragging her hind limbs, the doctor (veterinarian ) confirmed it to be bite injury causing damage in her spinal column, she initially could not urinate on her own, her bladder has to be evacuated with catheter every alternate day for a month. She underwent cesarean on May 5th and two kitten survived, kitten are healthy. After the injury she was given post exposure prophylaxis 5 doses of Nobivac® Rabies on 0,3,7,14 and 28th starting from April 15th to May 13th (however the 7th and 14th dose delayed by 1 and 5 days due to urine infection and fever. Is this post exposure vaccination effective? The vet in my place performed an xray on May 16th and plain xray revealed irreparable spinal chord fracture (probably the teeth of the biting stray dog went inside the spinal chord). Other than unable to urinate on her own sometimes and the rear leg paralysis, the cat looks fine, will the post exposure rabies vaccine work, is there any chance of her developing rabies in the future? In my place, there is no vet center where we can quarantine her for 6 months , so we have kept her home? It will be almost 3 months after the injury and she has not show any signs of rabies, she is eating fine and behaving normally , other than unable to walk due to hind leg paralysis cause of the spinal chord injury. Somewhere I read in the internet that "--post exposure prophylaxis should not be given on injured cats cause it mask symptoms of infection (like rabies) in cats. The documented rabies quarantine time is 6 months. There is a chance that any pet bitten by an unknown animal can develop rabies as we cannot affirm that the attacker did not have rabies--" But the veterinarian in my place gave the post exposure rabies injection, is this correct? Is there any chance of developing rabies in my cat in the future? Me and my family are taking care of the cat in the best possible way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Rabies can cause only and only by an infected mammal only to any mammal walking the earth. Infected mammals like a dog, may show typical signs of rabies (mad dog with ropy saliva from the jaws and red eyes), so easily identified a d isolated by fellow pack mates and humans. Rabies vaccination protects (doesn't mask the signs) a mammal like a cat or a dog or a human, from being infected by rabies when bitten by a rabid animal. Symptoms of rabies can be seen within a week to 10 days from the day of bite. Extra dosages of a rabies vaccine would not coz any harm as such except mild fever or local pain at the site of injection for a day or two. Your family is safe in handling the cat as it is not showing any such sign of the rabies infection so far. Rabies is transmitted only when your blood will come in contact with the saliva of an infected animal.
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Yesterday my dog attacked a dirty pig and i think my st. Bernard had broken pigs one leg and eaten. Consult me if it is dangerous for my pet or not?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As far as he digest it and be normal and act normally no problem . If feeling dull and calm than usual .Please refere a doc
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I adopted a 3 months old male Labrador puppy. It is having loose motions now n one episode of vomiting. It is completely vaccinated for first year. I changed its diet from pedigree to home cooked vegetarian food without any spices. What could be the reason?

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Sudden food change can be one ofbthe reson of stomach upset. Apart from this othet reason are stomach or inyestine infection, worms or eating unsual things. Kindly get your puppy examined from vet and follow his advice.
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Dear Sir, my 4 n years Old Lahaspho male dog has a problem by birth In its both of back legs (slightly bend legs). But it can walk n run well. Now I consulted a my regular doctor for mating, he said my dog legs were weak and it can't mate a dog. Am so upset seeking for a solution. Is there any alternative options to strengthen my dog's legs. Kindly help me.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
If as you say your dog can run and walk, clearily indicates dog has strength. For mating like any living being, the mood should b there to mate and the bitch has to b in heat only then dog will mate. Sinply leave dog with bitch who is to b mated and leave them alone. When a pet dog is left to mate for the first time, it will show shyness and thus may not mate untill bitch provokes the dog.
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Sir, My cow (4 year old- 2nd delivery) got delivered on 5 days back. She secreted milk in udder. Some milk also developed at naval (flank) part hanging like small bag. It gives milk 3L@2 times a day after delivery. Yesterday onwards, it won't lie down, milk got decreased to 1.5 L due to long time standing. Fodder intake also decreased. Is any serious problem. Any remedies/ relief tips. Please.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi lybrate-user, your cow may be suffering with Mastitis. (udder hardens, milk decreases, animal feels lot of pain). You need to go to ADDL (diagnostic lab. Get it checked for the milk test to know correct antibiotic to use. The problem may reduce.
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Hello My dog is mixed breed of lab and street and is 8 years old this year. Could you please let me know the precautions I should take ? He sheds hair every two months as well. But Is very active and runs a lot.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
For hair do regular brushing once a day and start some nutricoat tonic for hair. As considering age do blood test regular once in year.
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I have a pet dog who is 2 years 6 months old. 1 year back he got hit by stick in his balls. It cnt walk properly now he keep his back leg folded, we do takes nerobian tablets very freguently but now a day even after taking tablets he do not get well. So please help me out with some medicine and advise.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Kindly get him assessed by a vet nearby. Explore possibility of any fresh trauma/injury which is causing folded back leg. You may need radiographs to confirm any arthritis or bone lesions. Take care.
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Hi Doctor, We had given all vaccination's to our myson ,who is 2+ , lebra but some time we had noticed that he don't eat and avoid eating any thing. Also we had noticed that he want to have sex but after talking to so many people we are unable to get any friend for him. Would like to kindly suggest in this regards.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
sexual instinct will be there in dog to the core for few months in a year as they are seasonal breeders . they can only have this period only so its better to have a playmate for him at least twice a years or else his aggression would be different as age advances
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My 3 year old labrador retreiver is suffering with itches all over his body. What could be the reason for this?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Reason may an infection please send from mange to mite and fungal to viral please sent close up shots to identify the cause
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BVSC
Veterinarian, Ballia
The skin of your dog is entirely different from ours. There is significant ph difference so their skin is more sensitive than ours. Their body secretes some essential oils which gets depleted once you start bathing them daily. It results in drying of skin leading to flakes formation of policy kit is.
Some tips to remember---
*bathe your pets once in 10 days.
*groom your pets daily.
*do not use dettol/phenolic compounds on their body. It can be allergic.
*don't allow ticks/fleas/mites to thrive on their body.
*for hairy breeds, go for a complete hair-cut in summers.
*for breeds with drooping ears, take special care about ear cleaning.
*never use human soaps & shampoos like dove/clinic plus on dogs body. It can cause allergic dermatitis.
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My dog is 10 DAY old and he shivering at night. Can you explain why? And what precaution we should take.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
Shivering at night can be due to cold or fear. How is the overall condition of your pet. If your pet is otherwise healthy check pls keep him in warm enough.
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Sir my dog is of 7 month i.E pomalian dog & he is vomiting from 3 days , vomiting colour is yellow firstly then its light yellow colour from outside & inside it looks white sticky cough like so suggest anything sir ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Its summer gastritis please feed him half the food as usually and please give plenty of water and water melon if possible and suspension normetrogyl orally 5 ml 3 times daily and consult your vet.
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Hi, I have labrador and she has her bleeding started around 24th april. Usually in asked to wait for 11 days for the breeding process. Do you provide a healthy male companion? we are looking to expand the family via kids.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
It is better you contact your vet or any breeder nearby for the proper help in breeding your female labrador. Thank you.
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brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.
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How many times to feed a stray dog? n what food to feed exactly so that they get all the nutrients they need?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Feed twice with dog food available in the market at the rate of 300 gms in the morning and 200 in the evening . foods like pedigree, rc, hills, drools, smart heart , farmina , chickopee,etc a lot ranges available
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
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My female labrador, aged 9 years was diagnosed with diabetes which is now under control, but she has lost her vision due to a milky blue layer formation on the lens. Is it curable by surgery? What are the side effects post surgery?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
No side effects. Get her eyes operated soon. Looks like a cataract. If you delay the vision may never come back.
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6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
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