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Dr. Prretam Gupta

Cardiologist, Delhi

400 at clinic
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Dr. Prretam Gupta Cardiologist, Delhi
400 at clinic
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I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Prretam Gupta
Dr. Prretam Gupta is a popular Cardiologist in New Delhi, Delhi. He is currently associated with sunderlal hospital in New Delhi, Delhi. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Prretam Gupta on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Cardiologists in India. You will find Cardiologists with more than 39 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Cardiologists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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sunderlal hospital

Phase 3, Ashok Vihar, New DelhiDelhi Get Directions
400 at clinic
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What Is Angina?

MBBS, PG Diploma in Clinical Cardiology, Fellowship in Non invasive cardiology
Cardiologist, Gurgaon
What Is Angina?

It is true that most people are aware of the fact that ‘angina’ is a term which has something or the other to do with the heart. That being said, very few would be able to answer a question regarding what exactly it is, in a satisfactory manner. So would it not make sense to know more about it and become one of the few?

The term is derived from the ancient language of Latin and refers to a tightness that is felt or a squeezing of the chest. This happens when there is not enough oxygen-rich blood which is reaching the area of the heart muscle. While many people think that angina is a disease, it is actually not true to think that it is! As a matter of fact, it is a symptom of coronary artery disease. It is this disease which is the most common disease which affects the heart.

But why exactly does a person experience angina? Well, the lack of blood which is rich in oxygen occurs when it so happens that the coronary arteries become narrower than they normally should be. This generally happens due to the build-up of plaque. The condition in which this happens is known as atherosclerosis.

When it comes to the sort of people who are at a higher risk of developing angina, it can be said that those who smoke tobacco really do increase their risk, as do those who are overweight or obese and have other lifestyle diseases such as diabetes.

In order to avoid angina, the most important thing a person can possibly control is his or her lifestyle. In fact, a lot of the risk factors related to angina are attributable to the lifestyle a person chooses to lead. Cholesterol levels can be controlled if a person puts enough attention and effort in. Also, avoiding a lifestyle that is sedentary by exercise can not only help with cutting the risk of angina but also the risks of other conditions such as high blood pressure. It is ironic that high blood pressure is one of the potential signals of angina!

It is to be noted that while most people just call angina as it is, there are various types-

  1. Stable angina is when the heart is working harder than usual and medicine helps improve this.

  2. Unstable angina occurs even at rest and is unpredictable. It may also be a signal of a coming heart attack.

  3. Variant and microvascular angina is relievable by medicine and is generally rare. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

3130 people found this helpful

Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

Fellowship In Electrophysiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology, DM - Cardiology, MD - Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
Left Ventricular Assist Device - Understanding Its Usage!

A left ventricular assist device is an electromechanical device used in cases of advanced heart failure. In later stages of heart failure when the heart is weakened and no longer able to pump the necessary amount of blood, a left ventricular assist device can be surgically implanted to assist the heart’s functions.

A left ventricular assist device is often used as a short term solution and is different from a pacemaker, which is a long term cardiac assist device. The cases in which a left ventricular assist device is often used are:

  • As a temporary solution while a cardiac failure patient is on a transplant list or otherwise waiting for a heart transplant.
  • During recovery from cardiac surgery when the heart is not strong enough to function on its own. The device would soon be removed as the patient recovers.
  • During recovery from heart attacks

Having a left ventricular assist device implanted gives the heart time to rest and recover, leading you to the point where your heart can go back to functioning on its own. However, there are cases where a left ventricular assist device can be implanted as a long term solution. This treatment is called Destination Therapy and requires implanting a left ventricular assist device for several months or several years.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device works?
A Left Ventricular Assist Device can only be surgically implanted. It has both internal and external components with a pump attached to your heart and a controller on the outside of the body. The pump is attached to the heart with a tube that directs blood into the aorta. The pump and the controller are connected through a cable called the driveline. Since the Left Ventricular Assist Device is powered by electricity or batteries, a power source is also worn outside the body and is attached to the controller, powering both the controller and the pump.

How a Left Ventricular Assist Device can affect your lifestyle?
Many people around the world have Left Ventricular Assist Devices implanted on both a temporary and permanent basis. While a person should be resting while recovering from a heart attack or cardiac surgery, it is possible to go about your normal daily life whilst having a Left Ventricular Assist Device implanted. While certain exercises and stress should be avoided when having a heart condition or when implanted with a Left Ventricular Assist Device, with carrying cases for power sources and controller that can operate from various different power sources, it is easy to live a normal productive life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2222 people found this helpful

I am 26 year old and I have a old history of breathing problem and consult many doctors before also. I am still using avamys nasal spray but now my condition still got worsening so Please help me in this regard.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Few tips- avoid any triggering factor, take folicacid regularly, eat a healthy diet, always be stress free , exercise regularly
1 person found this helpful
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My wife is having high BP from her first pregnancy which is happened 3 years before. Now she is taking Telma 40 on daily night. Now we are planning for 2nd kid so what are the complications for her in conceiving 2nd kid. Kindly suggest us. Note Latest BP reading: 160/80 Weight: 95kgs Age: 29.

MBBS (Gold Medalist, Hons), MS (Obst and Gynae- Gold Medalist), DNB (Obst and Gynae), Fellow- Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (ACOG, USA), FIAOG, MRCOG (London, UK)
Gynaecologist, Kolkata
My wife is having high BP from her first pregnancy which is happened 3 years before. Now she is taking Telma 40 on da...
Yes, she might have high bp in 2nd pregnancy and this can complicate the health of her baby and herself. But remember, we treat many such patients successfully in day to day practice. So, she must consult gynecologist before planning pregnancy to have some check up, stop telma 40 and replace it with safer drugs (as telma can affect baby badly). She may need some other drugs and also constant monitoring throughout pregnancy. So, pregnancy must be well planned.
1 person found this helpful
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I am 55 taking tenolol 12.5 mg in the morning with that controlling my bp to 120/85 range or the past 10 years my recent blood test results shows blood urea nitrogen as 20.9 and bun sr creatinine ratio as 27.1 is that alarming. My ldl is 162 as well please give me the best advise and solution.

MSc Applied Biology, Diploma in Naturopathy
Ayurveda, Delhi
I am 55 taking tenolol 12.5 mg in the morning with that controlling my bp to 120/85 range or the past 10 years my rec...
A normal range for blood urea nitrogen is generally 8 to 24 mg/dl for adult males and In adult men, normal range of serum creatinine is 0.9-1.3 mg/dl; LDL Near Normal is 100-129 mg/dl your very much in control if you can change life style with exercise and plus some good compound having HCA natural component.
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Hello. I am 35 year old for last one year I am taking ecosprin 75 mg one time in a day as my family physician suggested with Rosofit 5 mg. Because my cholesterol levels was very high. Last week I have done my lips profile test an report is normal. My family physician suggested to discontinue the tablets. But I feel like continuing the same as after one year my body may have developed dependency on these two tablets. Can I continue to take ecosprin.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, DM - Cardiology, Cardiac Device Specialist (CCDS - Physician )
Cardiologist, Delhi
Hello. I am 35 year old for last one year I am taking ecosprin 75 mg one time in a day as my family physician suggest...
1) You donot need Ecosprin, you just need statin for cholesterol control. 2) If now your cholesterol levels are normal, you should try reducing and stopping medication while following lifestyle changes like daily exercises for 40-45 mins, no smoking or drinking and eating a healthy heart diet. 3) It is always better to reduce medications if we can with lifestyle precautions and these medications donot cause any kind of dependency.
1 person found this helpful
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My BP is increasing 150/100 or 160/120. Dr. Advice to take medicine regularly but I am not interested to depend on bp medicine. What should I do to control bp.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, DM - Cardiology, Fellowship in EP
Cardiologist, Delhi
My BP is increasing 150/100 or 160/120. Dr. Advice to take medicine regularly but I am not interested to depend on bp...
Control your weight. The best method for reducing weight is fairly simple, healthy and effective. Please discuss on phone if desired.
3 people found this helpful
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My father is having Concentrated Left ventricular hypertrophy. How can it be cured? Please help.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
My father is having Concentrated Left ventricular hypertrophy. How can it be cured? Please help.
We need to examine your fathers vital parameters of the body and than if necessary we can start with frusemide
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What to do for chest pain?

MD-Physician, PGDCC
Cardiologist, Jaipur
What to do for chest pain?
If you or your nearby person suddenly gets a chest pain.
Follow below given steps-

1) make the patient comfortable, lie him down and prevent any falls.
2) check whether he is breathing well and conscious.
3) give him tablet disprin as soon as possible
4) give an antacid also like- pantocid d or anyone.
4) give a tablet sorbitrate- if available to put below tongue and not to swallow.
5) if blood pressure can be measured and comes low, elevate his legs and let
Him lie flat.
5) call a medical help as soon as possible.

1624 people found this helpful

My mom is suffering from high blood pressure and have anxiety. She is getting weaker day by weaker and she is 60 year old.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
My mom is suffering from high blood pressure and have anxiety. She is getting weaker day by weaker and she is 60 year...
Lifestyle changes can help you control and prevent high blood pressure, even if you're taking blood pressure medication. Here's what you can do: Eat healthy foods. Eat a healthy diet. Try the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, poultry, fish and low-fat dairy foods. Get plenty of potassium, which can help prevent and control high blood pressure. Eat less saturated fat and trans fat. Decrease the salt in your diet. A lower sodium level — 1,500 milligrams (mg) a day — is appropriate for people 51 years of age or older, and individuals of any age who are black or who have hypertension, diabetes or chronic kidney disease. Otherwise healthy people can aim for 2,300 mg a day or less. While you can reduce the amount of salt you eat by putting down the saltshaker, you generally should also pay attention to the amount of salt that's in the processed foods you eat, such as canned soups or frozen dinners. Maintain a healthy weight. Keeping a healthy weight, or losing weight if you're overweight or obese, can help you control your high blood pressure and lower your risk of related health problems. If you're overweight, losing even 5 pounds (2.3 kilograms) can lower your blood pressure. Increase physical activity. Regular physical activity can help lower your blood pressure, manage stress, reduce your risk of several health problems and keep your weight under control. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity, or a combination or moderate and vigorous activity. Aim to do muscle-strengthening exercises at least two days a week. Limit alcohol. Even if you're healthy, alcohol can raise your blood pressure. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof liquor. Don't smoke. Tobacco injures blood vessel walls and speeds up the process of hardening of the arteries. If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit. Manage stress. Reduce stress as much as possible. Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and plenty of sleep can help, too. Monitor your blood pressure at home. Home blood pressure monitoring can help you keep closer tabs on your blood pressure, show if medication is working, and even alert you and your doctor to potential complications. Home blood pressure monitoring isn't a substitute for visits to your doctor, and home blood pressure monitors may have some limitations. Even if you get normal readings, don't stop or change your medications or alter your diet without talking to your doctor first. If your blood pressure is under control, you may be able to make fewer visits to your doctor if you monitor your blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help relax. There are some devices available that promote slow, deep breathing. However, it's questionable whether these devices have a significant effect on lowering your blood pressure.
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