Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary

Veterinarian, Delhi

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary Veterinarian, Delhi
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary
Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary is a trusted Veterinarian in Geeta Colony, Delhi. He is currently associated with Dr. Choudhary Dog Clinic in Geeta Colony, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary

Dr. Choudhary Dog Clinic

#11/178, Jheel Khurenja, Geeta Colony. Landmark: Near Ramleela Ground Gate No.1Delhi Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Yesterday 1 truck ran over my pet dog leg which leads to serious damage in its lower limb is there any treatment required to give it to relieve her. Some kind of painkiller so suggest me.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Do not let your dog move at all. There will not b any pain then. As no pain killers can remove the pain fully.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My labrador puppy is 0.8kg at the age of 6 weeks. In what amount I should feed him to make him healthier? Please help.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
See normal diet as must hv been advised to you by your vet. One thing you should remember as a thumb rule for all pets whtever food you give, make it a point that pet runs atleast 1-2 kms each day which is its normal need. If you donot provide the pet this opportunity, it will develop lethargy, become obese and will get risk of suffering from metabolic disease like human. Then your purpose of keeping a pet will b defeated.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

My rottie, 8months old (Male) He is having dark yellow urine and since last 2-3 days he is consuming less amount off food.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., BCKV
Veterinarian, Kolkata
It may be some trouble in his liver. Get a LFT test done. Now give a liver protectant like Hepamust syp 7.5 ml twice daily if it is 15 kg. Opt for a paid service.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Summer Management For Dogs!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

Summer can mean lots of fun outside with your dog. But when the temps soar, take steps to protect your pet. Whether you take him for a walk down the street, a ride in the car, or just out in the yard to play, the heat can be hard on him. Here's how to keep your furry best friend safe.

1. Never leave your dog in the car. No, not even if you think you’ll only be a few minutes. Even when it isn’t that hot outside, the temp can soar inside a closed car. On an 85-degree day, it can reach 102 F within 10 minutes. And that's with a window cracked. After 30 minutes, it could be up to 120. Leave your dog at home, or go places where he can come with you.

2. Keep your house cool. If Fido’s home alone, make sure he can truly chill. Leave the air conditioner on and close the drapes. If you don't have AC, open the windows and turn on a fan. You may want to try a cooling vest or mat to see if they help.

3. Watch when you exercise. Limit when and how much you do when it's hot and humid. Take walks in the cooler part of the day, in the early morning and evening hours. Carry water, too -- enough for both of you.

4. Check the pavement. Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it's too hot for your hand, it's too hot for your dog's paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn.

5. Offer plenty of water and shade. Don't leave your pooch alone outside for long. And when he is there, make sure he has shade and lots of fresh, cool water. Add ice cubes when you can. Trees are better than doghouses for shade. They let air flow through. Doghouses can trap the heat and make it worse. Think about a kiddie pool or a sprinkler to help your pal cool off in the yard.Make cool treats. Help your canine chill from the inside out. For puppy popsicles, make ice cubes with tasty treats inside. Or fill and freeze a chew toy to make a chilly snack.

6. Keep an eye on the humidity, too. When the air is full of moisture, your dog may not be able to pant enough to cool himself off. That can raise his temperature, which can lead to heatstroke. Stay inside, and limit exercise, too.

7. Take care of at-risk dogs. Be watchful if you have a snub-nosed pet like a pug or bulldog. Their smaller airways make it harder for them to release heat when they pant. It's also easy for old and overweight dogs, or those with heart and breathing problems, to get heatstroke.

8. Groom your pet. If your dog has long hair, get rid of any mats and tangles. It will help keep him cool. Don't shave or clip his coat before you talk to your vet or groomer. The extra fur that keeps him warm in winter may also keep him cool in summer.

9. Watch for signs of overheating. Your dog can't tell you when he doesn't feel well, so keep an eye out for heatstroke, which can have these symptoms:

  • Heavy panting
  • Heavy drooling
  • Trouble breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dark or red gums and tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Agitation
1 person found this helpful

Sir I am having a pug puppy of 65 days old and taken his 1st vaccination on 22nd june, 2015. Yesterday she lightly bite by daughter of 6 years old on her nose. Is it necessary to take her vaccine? pls. Advise.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
No need. they dont have any rabies infection so can wash it with running water and have dettol on the wound.
6 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a cat of 4 months old. I need to prevent it from pregnancy so is that possible through any injection or pill. Other then spay?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Hormone injection or pills could be given as contraception, but these come with sideffects. This can lead to some serious health issues to your kitten. Safest and reliable way is spaying.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

mera ek dogy ka size chhota hi rkhna chahta hu.kya koi aisa treatment hai. [I have a pet dog and I want to keep him small sized. Any treatment possible?]

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please tell your breed and age. Also it cant be possible for a heavy breed to keep it small you have to choose a smaller breed for this rather than asking to keep it small.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My pet 6 months old golden retriever in fed on golden retriever junior royal canin and the vet has suggested some human supplements like feroglobin and calicmax is it safe for him ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Yes its safe , even the human can have the tablets when its safe to the animals . So dont worry . I use nearly 95 % of medicine in human field only . And regarding dosage please consult your vet in supplementing it.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed