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Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary

Veterinarian, Delhi

Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary Veterinarian, Delhi
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary
Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary is a trusted Veterinarian in Geeta Colony, Delhi. He is currently associated with Dr. Choudhary Dog Clinic in Geeta Colony, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Prem Prakash Choudhary on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 34 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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My dog is not well i guess as today in the morning she was vomiting. So need some advice. (Breed of dog is Crocker spaniel).

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Cocker spaniel , beagle , shih tzu all they are small breeds please protect from sun stroke in this summer they tend to vomit and off feed for a day or two if serious take to nearest vet.
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brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

Sir or madam my dog getting blood in stool what happen I do not no please tell me there is any medicine and tell me the name of that medicine please please. Please reply fast.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Plz give arnica 30 c drops - 3 drops in the mouth morning and evening until you reach to your nearby vet for injections and glucose drips.
1 person found this helpful
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Sir we are a diary oprators in india sir we are suffering from mastitas regular basis we are a 70 catteles please suggest what can we do suffering from clinical mastitas

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear , an occurrence of mastitis due to unhygienic condition of milker, animal & animal house. General practice for control of mastitis as follow. 1. Before milking, hand of milker should be clean with detergent and dry off. 2. Milking pattern should be full hand milking not knuckling milking 3. Udder of animal should be clean with detergent and dry off before milking. 4. After milking animal should be standing position for half to one hour 5. Animal house should be clean with detergent and dry off.
6 people found this helpful
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I have 22 months german shepherd female. N she is not eating properly. . Her health is not developing .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Need to access the food quality and you r diet regime and if needed we have to include more protein diet please consult a vet for diet.
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Question specifically for a veterinarian but open to all. Post exposure rabies vaccination in injured pet cat, bitten by unknown animal (probably by stray dog), with visible bite mark injuries on back, resulting in paralysis of the the rear section of the cat (hind legs dragging) due to fracture of the spinal chord. My cat (female, 4 years) old was bitten on April 14th 2016 by an unknown animal (the vet in my place India suspected it to be a dog). She was pregnant at the time of injury. The cat was vaccinated (rabies vaccine CANVAC® R) given in last January and February 2015, I took the cat in a jute sack to the veterinarian and his assistant ,however, injected the vaccines both the times through the sack, however he said to me that he was sure that the vaccines were injected successfully. The cat however missed the scheduled anti rabies booster dose in Feb 2016. Actually the cat it belonged to my aunt residing near my house but somehow she came to our place, however at night she always stay outside like a free roaming cat. Two months back (possibly nite of April 14th 2016) the injury took place and we found her in our garage dragging her hind limbs, the doctor (veterinarian ) confirmed it to be bite injury causing damage in her spinal column, she initially could not urinate on her own, her bladder has to be evacuated with catheter every alternate day for a month. She underwent cesarean on May 5th and two kitten survived, kitten are healthy. After the injury she was given post exposure prophylaxis 5 doses of Nobivac® Rabies on 0,3,7,14 and 28th starting from April 15th to May 13th (however the 7th and 14th dose delayed by 1 and 5 days due to urine infection and fever. Is this post exposure vaccination effective? The vet in my place performed an xray on May 16th and plain xray revealed irreparable spinal chord fracture (probably the teeth of the biting stray dog went inside the spinal chord). Other than unable to urinate on her own sometimes and the rear leg paralysis, the cat looks fine, will the post exposure rabies vaccine work, is there any chance of her developing rabies in the future? In my place, there is no vet center where we can quarantine her for 6 months , so we have kept her home? It will be almost 3 months after the injury and she has not show any signs of rabies, she is eating fine and behaving normally , other than unable to walk due to hind leg paralysis cause of the spinal chord injury. Somewhere I read in the internet that "--post exposure prophylaxis should not be given on injured cats cause it mask symptoms of infection (like rabies) in cats. The documented rabies quarantine time is 6 months. There is a chance that any pet bitten by an unknown animal can develop rabies as we cannot affirm that the attacker did not have rabies--" But the veterinarian in my place gave the post exposure rabies injection, is this correct? Is there any chance of developing rabies in my cat in the future? Me and my family are taking care of the cat in the best possible way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Rabies can cause only and only by an infected mammal only to any mammal walking the earth. Infected mammals like a dog, may show typical signs of rabies (mad dog with ropy saliva from the jaws and red eyes), so easily identified a d isolated by fellow pack mates and humans. Rabies vaccination protects (doesn't mask the signs) a mammal like a cat or a dog or a human, from being infected by rabies when bitten by a rabid animal. Symptoms of rabies can be seen within a week to 10 days from the day of bite. Extra dosages of a rabies vaccine would not coz any harm as such except mild fever or local pain at the site of injection for a day or two. Your family is safe in handling the cat as it is not showing any such sign of the rabies infection so far. Rabies is transmitted only when your blood will come in contact with the saliva of an infected animal.
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I have got a golden retriever of 6 months and its has hurt its leg while playing .

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
If he is climbing please take x-ray or if not just pain killer would do with calcium tablets please consult your vet as soon as possible
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.
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Sir I have a 2 months 3 week old great dane puppy and his only single testicle has dropped he weighs 12 kg and is 16 inches tall we feed him hills science plan and there is no other issue kindly suggest what are the remedies for it

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
U can wait upto 4 month of age if testical r not descend then you have to pelvic sonography to find position and accordingly you can step up
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Is spaying for dog helpful and safe? Please also mention its advantage and disadvantage.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Spaying is helpful for dog. It prevent dog from lot of problems like tumor, pyometra & hormonal imbalance. Only disadvantage is that dog put up weight after operation.
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My 10 months labrador, for past 2 days sits and drag his but on ground and lick it several times. I saw his butt (anal, it was a little reddish and there was a itching redness near his anal. Please suggest me what to do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot
You can do 1. Keep away your lab from water lodges area or not allow to go that place 2. Apply the ointment for pets it will work or some powder preparation so it will not licks for more detail consult a doctor.
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My lab puppy was 30 days old, which vaccination should he need now and schedule when he need?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You need to get your dog vaccinated against arv, 6 in 1 and corona vaccine. This vaccination start at age of 45 days. For details about vaccination dosage and schedule you should contact nearst vet because disease prevalence varies with location.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
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6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
6 Most Dangerous People- Foods for Dogs
Most Dangerous People Foods for Dogs

Dogs must never be fed with following people-food. It’s only slow poison for your pets.

1. Onions & Garlic: These are highly flavored foods and can cause toxicosis in dogs.
2. Chocolate: Ingestion of chocolate by dogs can cause abdominal pain and vomiting to them due to the presence of theobromine and caffeine.
3. Avocado: Dogs must never be fed with avocado flesh or skin. Not just avocado fruit but even various parts of avocado tree are fatal for dogs.
4. Raisins & Grapes: Even slight feeding of raisins or grapes can pose problem to dogs. Their ingestion can cause kidney failure to them.
5. Nuts: Nuts contain phosphorus that can cause bladder stones in dogs. Ingestion of walnuts and macadamia result in vomiting, joint swelling and muscular pain in dogs.
6. Xylitol: Xylitol is a sweetener that is very harmful for dogs for it can cause them loss of coordination, seizure and even liver failure.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.
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I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
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Why Do People Torture Animals

MSc, PGDGC
Psychologist, Chennai
Why Do People Torture Animals

Why do people/student torture animals- what drives them?
Can we analaysis and find solution: let try to stop this any more in our life
As we all aware that two animals cruelty incidents happened in tamilnadu, one with the dog and another with an monkey.
Case a, 12 yrs old kid hitting cat with broomstick, their parents brought for an counseling that he has not coutesy for animal and he was killing without any guilt.
Case b, 23 yrs adult was burning a rat alive with kerosine and feeling happy to see that rat die with burn.
And there are many cases which were not recorded and submitted for case discussion.
What typically possesses them to inflict such acts of intentional animal torture and cruelty? 
These are because of psychological disorders (such as anti-social/psychopathic personality disorders and engage in deliberate acts of zoosadism), and/or because they have sexually paraphilic disorders (such as crush fetishism in which small animals are crushed for sexual pleasure). 
This may be common behaviour among murderers and rapists - those with psychopathic traits characterized by impulsivity, selfishness, and lack of remorse.
Animal torture and cruelty is one of the three adolescent behaviours in what is often referred to the homicidal triad , the other two being persistent bedwetting and obsessive fire-setting. The combination of two or more of these three behaviours increases the risk of homicidal behaviour in adult life.
The behaviours in the homicidal triad are often associated with parental abuse, parental brutality (and witnessing domestic violence), and/or parental neglect.
What we can do:
The best way to prevent it is teaching by example. Parents and teachers are the key and plays very important role.
Pro-social behaviour (action/behaviours intended to help others) by parents and other role models towards animals, such as rescuing spiders in the bath, feeding birds/ants, treating pets as a member of the family, 
Schools and colleges can have some pet home in the campus.
These activities or act has the potential to make a positive lasting impression on children.
It's a start, lets all have at least one pet in the home make your son/ daughter to take care of them (pet therapy).

Regards:
Elayaraja m. Sc, m. Phil, pgdgc, pgdha
Counseling psychologist,
Kavithalyaa counseling centre, ambattur, chennai-53.

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Monsoon Concerns - Leptospirosis.!!!!

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Monsoon Concerns - Leptospirosis.!!!!
Monsoon may be a great time to go outdoors with your pets and enjoy the rains. But be aware of the hidden dangers.

- leptospirosis is around and can cause lethal liver and kidney disease in dogs.
- water logging in metro cities can be a source of such fatal infections. Transmitted via urine of rats/dead rats --> Dogs can readily become infected despite vaccinations.
- common in farms too, wherever there is rat population.
- leptospirosis is a contagious to humans as well, and infected dogs, their urine becomes an important carrier for humans.
- initial signs include vomiting, jaundice, reduced urination, kidney failure.
- if not identified and treated early, it can become fatal.
- early diagnosis and specific treatment can save your pet.
- proper precautions and hygiene can save your family from exposure.
- do not let your pets walk through, or drink from water puddles.

Please speak to us for more information on this.
Have a safe monsoon!
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Pl. Suggest is it true for a german shepherd breed that they should not sit on floor like tiles which can get them bad or deformed legs as such my dog just one month of age prefers to sit only on tiles,it never sits on dari or other mats.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
True as they could not balance a slippery floor . because they have paws as there foot it needs rough surface to have a grip so please try to avoid the tile flooring as much as possible
2 people found this helpful
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Sir my dog has got canine parvo virus and it has been cured now total 1 month has been over after treatment today I have taken it for first time vaccination they have given rakshab and something like meg---- is there any need to go for deworming of puppy which was just 5- 6 months old.

BVSc
Veterinarian, Noida
Deworming is done every month once upto 6 month age of puppy. After that, its done at 3 month interval upto the life span of your dog. So, if your vet is suggesting for deworming, just go for it. Only a tablet or 2 will be given to your puppy as per weight of your puppy.
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What should I give my pet parrot to eat which is healthy for him?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian,
All nuts and fruits available in the market like chashew. Soaked badam. Chilly red one or the bell pepper in different colours sunflower seeds. Any nuts.
4 people found this helpful
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