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Dr. Navya Narula

Ayurveda, Delhi

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Dr. Navya Narula Ayurveda, Delhi
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Navya Narula
Dr. Navya Narula is a popular Ayurveda in Dilshad Garden, Delhi. You can meet Dr. Navya Narula personally at Navya Naru Ayush Center in Dilshad Garden, Delhi. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Navya Narula on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Ayurvedas in India. You will find Ayurvedas with more than 42 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Ayurvedas online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Navya Naru Ayush Center

N-26/A-3, Block N, Dilshad Garden, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
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Dear sir What is the difference between bypass surgery nd stent placement in heart?

Diploma in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
General Physician, Delhi
Dear sir
What is the difference between bypass surgery nd stent placement in heart?
Sent is also called baloon intervention, it's not a surgery in the real sense, a device is passed through a major blood vessel of body and blockages in blood vessels giving blood to heart are cleared, in bypass surgery, blood vessels are taken from legs or arms are grafted and connected to major blood vessels supplying blood to entire body bypass rout is created for blood to flow smoothly to entire body and yes it is a major surgery but with advanced technology, there is nothing to fear by both procedures.
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I am 68 years young (?) having sleeping disorder since 15 years. I am using some allopathy sleep medicine without much benefit. Please let me know What can you suggest?.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
I am 68 years young (?) having sleeping disorder since 15 years. I am using some allopathy sleep medicine without muc...
In this age sleep disorder is common and you need only less sleep than before and meditation and yoga can help you better
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.
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During sex ,if vaginal fluid will come out simultaneously have any chances sperm also merge with fluid to come out?

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Sexologist, Lucknow
During intercourse male discharge millions of sperm in one time. Some sperm comes out with vaginal fluids but some sperm succeed to reach fallopian tube and only one sperm succeed to fertilize ovum which presents in fallopian tube. Remaining sperm discarded with vaginal fluids out. This is normal to come out some sperm with vaginal fluids.
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Not able to see towards my right side. And also not able to twist my neck. Its somehow locked from one side. Its painful while turning my neck. This problem raised when I woke up in the morning. Day is almost FINISHED but no rest. What should I do. Please give me home remedies.

MD - General Medicine, DM - Rheumatology
Rheumatologist, Delhi
Not able to see towards my right side. And also not able to twist my neck. Its somehow locked from one side. Its pain...
If this is so sudden onset, you probably had an acute muscle spasm. See a doctor, take pain killers and muscle relaxant. It will be better in 2-3 days.
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I am loosing hair early as my age, and I try all the things for my hair for regain, so guide me how to regain hair.

BHMS
Homeopath, Sindhudurg
I am loosing hair early as my age, and I try all the things for my hair for regain, so guide me how to regain hair.
Juice of potato for controlling hair fall Lack of vitamins and minerals can cause dry and brittle hairs which can trigger hair fall. Potato can be a good remedy to control hair fall in this case. Potato is rich in Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, manganese, phosphorus, copper and niacin which can be helpful for boosting hair growth. Crush some cleaned potato and squeeze out the juice. Now apply this fresh juice directly onto your scalp and hairs. Leave on for 30 minutes to an hour but do not let the pack get dry. Wash off with plenty of water.
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Hello Doctor, Im married, blessed with two kids. I feel stressed and do have mood swings. I often forget the things to do. Am I suffering from Alzheimer's. Kindly suggest.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Mumbai
Hello Doctor, Im married, blessed with two kids. I feel stressed and do have mood swings. I often forget the things t...
It is less likely that you have Alzheimer's disease. The possibility is that all your memory related issues are due to stress, lack of attention and mood problems. Loss of interest, decreased concentration and attention, feeling low and disturbed sleep or appetite are some of the signs of depression. Consult a psychiatrist who will assess you in detail. If you are feeling suicidal or hopeless, seek professional help immediately. Try some relaxation techniques like yoga, meditation and deep breathing. Indulge in hobbies. Spend time with people close to you.
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How do I identify a person with depression problems, since I am working with students, disinterest in academic activities is one, apart from this the complex they have when they come from a rural back ground to city with so called in vogue things around etc.

M.S. Counselling and Psychotherapy
Psychologist, Bangalore
How do I identify a person with depression problems, since I am working with students, disinterest in academic activi...
A typically depressed person will have following symptoms: 1. Loss of interest in daily routine activities. 2. Too much sleep or not able to sleep, not eating. 3 not bothered about personal hygiene 4. Not talking to anyone, not expressing feelings. 5. Avoid interaction with others. 6. Keep crying on and off 7. No facial expression, emotional numbness 8. Talking about worthlessness, expressing wish to commit suicide. 9 feeling totally hopeless, not able to enjoy life. If you identify anyone with above mentioned symptoms, please try to talk to that student, listen to him with empathy. Ask his friends to be with him/her, if the student is talking about suicide. Please make them aware that since they are coming from different place and background, they will be different. But they need not be ashamed of it. If they wish they can learn some etiquettes, dialect etc which is more acceptable in urban areas. They need to give themselves some time to come at par with their urban counterparts. Please help them to focus on their strengths by asking them to write if down on a paper and ask them to read it every day. Also help them to learn spoken english, if possible train them for public speaking etc. It will boost their self confidence. I am very happy to see your commitment towards your students. Wish you good luck.
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I have face a problem with mouth ulcer it can be happen regularly week by week. I already Consulted doctor he suggested as it comes for stress but it happens from childhood but not regularly. Please advise.

BHMS
Homeopath, Ludhiana
I have face a problem with mouth ulcer it can be happen regularly week by week. I already Consulted doctor he suggest...
Are you sufferring from constipation? if yes cure it first. Eat fibre in your diet, whole wheat, plenty of water. Avoid spicy and fatty food. Take nux vomica 200 one dose empty stomach acidum nitricum 30 four drops tds for 4 days. After that inform
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Hi I had unprotected sex with girlfriend in 5th if night and we had again done on 8th morning and it is unprotected she had taken I-Pill on 8th of evening her cycle date is 25th but she hadn't done with it yet Today is 1st August and she didn't getting any symptoms of the cycle. The pill was taken within 72 hours from the date 5th night to 8th night. Suggest.

MD-Ayurveda,Kayachikitsa(Ayurvedic physician), BAMS, MD
Ayurveda, Jammu
Hi
I had unprotected sex with girlfriend in 5th if night and we had again done on 8th morning and it is unprotected s...
Dear user wait for another few days n get her urine for pregnancy test at home. Any how if she has taken I pill chances are almost no. But to rule out pregnancy pregnancy test is to be done. Thnx.
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