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Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta

Pediatrician, Delhi

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Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta Pediatrician, Delhi
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta
Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta is an experienced Pediatrician in Patparganj, Delhi. He is currently associated with Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta in Patparganj, Delhi. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta on has a number of highly qualified Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 42 years of experience on You can find Pediatricians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.


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Dr. Naveen Prakash Gupta

108 A, Indraprastha Extension, Patparganj, Delhi, Delhi Delhi Get Directions
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My daughter is 16 years old. She has made a habit of sleeping late around 1p. M.daily and getting up late around 12,12:30. She is overweight and is very inactive. She does not listen to any one. She is suffering from thyroid and has multiple gallbladder stones. What should I do?

MD ayurveda
Ayurveda, Navi Mumbai
My daughter is 16 years old. She has made a habit of sleeping late around 1p. M.daily and getting up late around 12,1...
1 person found this helpful
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What is Impetigo in Children?

MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad

What is impetigo in children?

Impetigo is an infection of the skin. When it affects just the surface, it’s called superficial impetigo. Impetigo can also affect deeper parts of the skin. This is called ecthyma. It may occur on healthy skin. Or it may occur where the skin was injured by a cut, scrape, or insect bite.

Impetigo is most common in children from ages 2 to 5. It is contagious. This means it’s easily passed from one person to another. It can be spread around a household. Children can infect other family members, and can reinfect themselves.

What causes impetigo in a child?

Impetigo is caused by bacteria. The bacteria that can cause it include:

  • Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus

  • Staphylococcus aureus

Who is at risk for impetigo in a child?

Impetigo is more common in children, but adults may also have the infection. A child is more likely to get impetigo if he or she:

  • Has close contact with to others with impetigo

  • Does not keep clean (poor hygiene)

  • Is in warm, moist (humid) air

  • Has other skin conditions, such as scabies or eczema

What are the symptoms of impetigo in a child?

Symptoms can occur a bit differently in each child. They also vary depending on which bacteria caused it. Symptoms can include:

  • Red bumps

  • Sores that are filled with fluid, draining fluid, or crusted over

  • Areas that are red, swollen, and may itch

  • Swelling of nearby lymph glands (nodes)

The bumps or sores can occur anywhere on the body. But they are most common on the face, arms, and legs.

The symptoms of impetigo can be like other health conditions. Make sure your child sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is impetigo diagnosed in a child?

The healthcare provider will ask about your child’s symptoms and health history. He or she will give your child a physical exam. A sample of the pus from the sores may be sent to a lab. This is called a culture. It’s done to see what type of bacteria caused the infection. It can help the doctor decide the best antibiotic for treatment.

How is impetigo treated in a child?

Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is. Treatment may include:

  • Prescription antibiotic cream or ointment. This is most often done for mild impetigo. Over-the-counter antibiotic cream or ointment is usually not advised.

  • Antibiotic pills or liquid by mouth (oral). This is most often advised if your child has several areas of impetigo or ecthyma. It may also be advised if more than one person in a household has impetigo.

  • Cleaning and bandaging. You will need to gently washing affected areas of your child’s skin with mild soap and water. Cover areas that are draining fluid. Make sure to wash your hands before and after caring for your child’s impetigo.

What are possible complications of impetigo in a child?

Possible complications of impetigo can include:

  • Worsening or spreading of the infection

  • Scarring, which is more common with ecthyma

Impetigo caused by beta-hemolytic strep bacteria can cause:

  • Kidney damage (poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis)

  • Fever, joint, and other problems (rheumatic fever)

What can I do to prevent impetigo in my child?

You can help to prevent impetigo and prevent it from spreading to others. The following may help:

  • Keep your child out of daycare or school for 24 hours after starting antibiotic treatment. Your child can return after 24 hours. Cover any draining sores with bandages.

  • Make sure your child and everyone else in your household washes his or her hands well. This means using soap and water and scrubbing well.

  • Have everyone in the household use their own towels for drying hands and for after bathing. Do not share towels.

  • Keep your child's fingernails short. This can help prevent your child scratching and spreading the infection.

When should I call my child's healthcare provider?

Call the healthcare provider if your child has a skin infection after being in contact with anyone who has impetigo.

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My daughter 2.5 yrs old has a very low diet and doesn't take milk at all. What shall i do ?

ICMR Training. in. clinical. Genetics and Metabolism, Fellowship in Pediatric And Adolescent Endocrinology
Pediatrician, Jalandhar
Dont force her for milk. Not essential. Stop all chips chocolates and junk food. Dont run after her for feeding. These three things if followed religiously have a hundred percent result.
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My child is 4 months and ten days now. When should I start giving cerelac and other home cooked baby food to him?

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician, Kurukshetra
My child is 4 months and ten days now. When should I start giving cerelac and other home cooked baby food to him?
You should breast feed your baby for six months and then introduce semisolids. Home cooked foods are better than market foods.
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My son is 5 month old. I would like to introduce fruit juice and ragi porridge for him. Can you give me idea about the food chart that can be given for him.

Pediatrician, Gandhinagar
Wait until completion of six months. Start with liquids only. Gradually give semi solids. Any home made food can be given.
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“Look, Mom! I Have a Loose Tooth!

Dentist, Mumbai
“Look, Mom! I Have a Loose Tooth!
It’s a pretty special moment when your child runs to you for the first time and tells you their tooth is loose. For a child, loose teeth means that they’ll be a big kid soon. For parents, it means their little one is growing up fast…maybe a little too fast. So what should you do when your child comes to you with the exciting news? Here are the things every parent should know about losing that first tooth.

When do kids start losing their baby teeth?
Children will lose their first tooth around age 6. They’ll continue to lose 3–4 teeth per year until they have lost all 20 of their baby teeth by about age 12.

Which teeth fall out first?
Baby teeth usually fall out in the order they came in. The front bottom teeth are often the first to go. The last teeth to fall out are usually the big molars in the back of the mouth.

Does losing a tooth hurt?
Losing a tooth shouldn’t hurt very much. If it is very painful, it probably means that your child is trying to pull a tooth that’s not quite ready to come out. If the pain gets bad, you can put an over-the-counter, pain-relieving gel on the gum surrounding the tooth. Make sure it’s for children, and don’t use it too much or too often.

Should I pull a loose tooth?
The short answer is no. It can tear the gum tissue around the tooth and cause injury. Allow your child to gently wiggle their tooth. But tell them they should let a tooth fall out on its own.

What happens if my child swallows their tooth?
Nothing, really. Accidentally swallowing a tooth isn’t a big deal. It will simply pass through the body.

Will there be a lot of blood when my child loses their tooth?
There shouldn’t be very much blood at all. When there is a lot of blood, it is usually caused by forcing a tooth out before it is ready. To stop bleeding, have your child bite down on gauze, cotton ball or a clean cloth until the bleeding slows.

When do permanent teeth start to grow in?
Usually it takes a few weeks for the permanent tooth to begin to poke through. It will take a few months more for the tooth to fully grow in.

What to do when i see a permanent tooth erupting before the baby tooth has fallen out?
You need to visit your dentist and get a examination done for your child. In some cases it may be advisable to remove the baby tooth to make way for the permanent one.

Hello doctors, My son is 4 years old. Whenever he travels in car and especially when ac is on he vomits. Kindly suggest remedy.

Pediatrician, Kaithal
He is having motion sickness. He will need medicine before every journey. You can prevent such episodes with the help of such medicine. But you have to consult your doctor for proper dose and any other precautions needed.
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My 2.5 months old daughter has started gaining bumps on her face. Doctor recommended to apply mometasone cream on her face twice a day. But little bit confused as some say they should be applied on skin of kids older than 2 years. Any help will be appreciated.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MS - Counselling and Psychotherapy
Ayurveda, Jammu
My 2.5 months old daughter has started gaining bumps on her face. Doctor recommended to apply mometasone cream on her...
Hello lybrate-user yes the skin of babies is very delicate so avoid all this n try that the no body kisses her face n before sleep clean her face.
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Are there any long-term effects associated with taking ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) medications? If so, what are they and what medications are implicated?

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Nothing major, in terms of side effects or increased health risks, has been found for taking medications to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD There are no long-term studies assessing these meds in people who have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. Almost all of the data on stimulants comes from patients who have been diagnosed with narcolepsy -- a genetically based sleep disorder that causes excessive sleepiness and frequent daytime sleep attacks. Narcoleptics take mild stimulants daily to treat their condition, often for decades. There have been no reported problems.Anyone who is concerned about medication safety should remember the risks of non-treatment. Untreated ADD/ADHD adversely affects a person's life in many ways. Those with ADD/ADHD who don’t take medication have a significant increase in auto accidents, drug abuse, unplanned pregnancy, and job loss.They also are more likely to separate and/or divorce compared with those who take medication.
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