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Dr. Mayura Baliyan

Gynaecologist, New Delhi

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Dr. Mayura Baliyan Gynaecologist, New Delhi
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Mayura Baliyan
Dr. Mayura Baliyan is a trusted Gynaecologist in New Delhi, Delhi. She is currently associated with Dr Mayura Baliyan's Clinic in New Delhi, Delhi. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Mayura Baliyan on has a number of highly qualified Gynaecologists in India. You will find Gynaecologists with more than 36 years of experience on Find the best Gynaecologists online in Delhi. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.


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What is vagina discharge and do it mandatory during sex I am virgin and I use to be wet when I insert finer in vagina but not discharge?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user. In Indian context, loosing virginity is breaking of the HYMN. The hymen is a membrane that surrounds or partially covers the external vaginal opening. It forms part of the vulva, or external genitalia, and is similar in structure to the vagina. The hymen does not seem to have a specific physiological function or purpose. The hymn could break due to cycling, stretching exercises, swimming etc. Therefore, don't worry. Take care.
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Hi Sir and Madam, my wife has taken (two tablets) medicine to stop breastfeeding two days back, but milk is coming and also our baby doesn't want to stop, so she wants to continued for few Months more. Is there any problem to my baby's health?

Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Hi Sir and Madam, my wife has taken (two tablets) medicine to stop breastfeeding two days back, but milk is coming an...
Pltake take one more ohrse at wekly interval and donot feed the baby or express the milk manually it will take 3/4 days to completely stop.
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I am 27 year old. Mere dono breast ke bich me 1 ganth ho rahi h. Kya ye breast cancer ka sign h?

UICC International Fellow in Oncollogy , ESTRO certification in Head and neck oncology, MD - Radiothrapy
Oncologist, Jamnagar
Hi, The area you r telling is called sternal area. Which is very rarely site for breast cancer. If it is hard, go for examination by specialist.
2 people found this helpful
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I am 29 year old and my husband's age is 34 year. We have 3 year old daughter. Now we are planning our second child for 7 months but not getting positive result. Me and my husband's reports are normal. But at the time of ovulation study doctor told me that I have 4.3*4.7 mm polyp in endometrial cavity and increase the chance of infertility. She suggested me hysteroscopy. Should I follow her.

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
I am 29 year old and my husband's age is 34 year. We have 3 year old daughter. Now we are planning our second child f...
Take Conium 1m once a wk for 3 wk puls 30 one dos per dy for wk kali br 12c one dos a day for 10 days aur mur na. 12c sam abov apis 30 once a day for 4days
1 person found this helpful
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Sexual Conditions Overview

Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S)
Sexologist, Chennai
Sexual Conditions Overview

Sexual Conditions Overview


Sexual conditions, or STDs, include chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and trichomoniasis. Vaginal or penal discharge and burning or pain during urination can indicate a STD. STD treatment and prevention includes medication and practicing safe sex.


HPV Infection in Men

Much of the information about HPV virus (human papillomavirus) centers on women, since having the virus increases their risk of getting cervical cancer. But HPV virus in men can cause health problems, too. It's important for men to understand how to reduce the risks of HPV infection.

HPV infection can increase a man's risk of getting genital cancers, although these cancers are not common. HPV can also cause genital warts in men, just as in women.

Risks of HPV Infection in Men

Some of the 30 or so types of HPV associated with genital cancers can lead to cancer of the anus or penis in men. Both of these cancer types are rare, especially in men with a healthy immune system.

The Symptoms of HPV in Men

The types of high-risk HPV that can cause cancer rarely present any symptoms in men or in women. Genital warts are the first symptom you may see with low-risk HPV strains that cause warts but not cancer.

How to Prevent Spreading HPV

Abstinence is the only sure way to prevent HPV transmission. Risk of transmission can be lowered if a person has sex only with one person who is not infected and who is also monogamous.

To lower the risk of HPV transmission, men can also limit the number of sex partners and pick partners who have had few or no partners in the past.

Condoms can provide some protection against HPV transmission. Unfortunately, they aren't 100% effective, since HPV is transmitted primarily by skin-to-skin contact. The virus can still infect the skin uncovered by the condom.

In a recent study of young women who had just become sexually active, those whose partners used a condom each time they had sex were 70% less likely to get an HPV infection than were women whose partners used a condom less than 5% of the time

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Everything You Want To Know About Endometriosis

FRCOG (LONDON) (Fellow of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists), CCT (Lon), DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Everything You Want To Know About Endometriosis

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond pelvic organs.

With endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that can cause pelvic tissues and organs to stick to each other.

Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.


The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual cramp that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain increases over time.

Common Signs and Symptoms of Endometriosis may include:

  • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea). Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before your period and extend several days into your period. You may also have lower back and abdominal pain.

  • Pain with intercourse. Pain during or after sex is common with endometriosis.

  • Pain with bowel movements or urination. You're most likely to experience these symptoms during your period.

  • Excessive bleeding. You may experience occasional heavy periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

  • Infertility. Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility.

  • Other symptoms. You may also experience fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods.

The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have intense pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all.

Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis.

When to see a doctor

See the doctor if you have signs and symptoms that may indicate endometriosis.

Endometriosis can be a challenging condition to manage. An early diagnosis, a multidisciplinary medical team and an understanding of your diagnosis may result in better management of your symptoms.


Although the exact cause of endometriosis is not certain, possible explanations include:

  • Retrograde menstruation. In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle.

  • Transformation of peritoneal cells. In what's known as the "induction theory," experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells.

  • Embryonic cell transformation. Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty.

  • Surgical scar implantation. After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision.

  • Endometrial cells transport. The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body.

  • Immune system disorder. It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus.

Risk factors

Several factors place you at greater risk of developing endometriosis, such as:

  • Never giving birth

  • Starting your period at an early age

  • Going through menopause at an older age

  • Short menstrual cycles — for instance, less than 27 days

  • Having higher levels of estrogen in your body or a greater lifetime exposure to estrogen your body produces

  • Low body mass index

  • Alcohol consumption

  • One or more relatives (mother, aunt or sister) with endometriosis

  • Any medical condition that prevents the normal passage of menstrual flow out of the body

  • Uterine abnormalities

Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche). Signs and symptoms of endometriosis end temporarily with pregnancy and end permanently with menopause, unless you're taking estrogen.



The main complication of endometriosis is impaired fertility. Approximately one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis may obstruct the tube and keep the egg and sperm from uniting. But the condition also seems to affect fertility in less-direct ways, such as damage to the sperm or egg. Inspite of this, many women with mild to moderate endometriosis can still conceive and carry a pregnancy to term. Doctors sometimes advise women with endometriosis not to delay having children because the condition may worsen with time.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer does occur at higher than expected rates in women with endometriosis. Although rare, another type of cancer — endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma — can develop later in life in women who have had endometriosis.

Diagnosis: To diagnose endometriosis and other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, the doctor will ask you to describe your symptoms, including the location of your pain and when it occurs.

Tests to check for physical clues of endometriosis include:

  • Pelvic exam. During a pelvic exam, the doctor manually feels (palpates) areas in your pelvis for abnormalities, such as cysts on your reproductive organs or scars behind your uterus. Often it's not possible to feel small areas of endometriosis, unless they've caused a cyst to form.

  • Ultrasound. A transducer, a device that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of your body, is either pressed against your abdomen or inserted into your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). Both types of ultrasound may be done to get the best view of your reproductive organs. Ultrasound imaging won't definitively tell the doctor whether you have endometriosis, but it can identify cysts associated with endometriosis (endometriomas).

  • Laparoscopy. Medical management is usually tried first. But to be certain you have endometriosis, the doctor may advise a surgical procedure called laparoscopy to look inside your abdomen for signs of endometriosis.

While you're under general anesthesia, the doctor makes a tiny incision near your navel and inserts a slender viewing instrument (laparoscope), looking for endometrial tissue outside the uterus. He or she may take samples of tissue (biopsy). Laparoscopy can provide information about the location, extent and size of the endometrial implants to help determine the best treatment options.

Treatment for endometriosis is usually with medications or surgery. The approach you and the doctor choose will depend on the severity of your signs and symptoms and whether you hope to become pregnant.

Generally, doctors recommend trying conservative treatment approaches first, opting for surgery as a last resort.

Pain medications

The doctor may recommend that you take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve, others), to help ease painful menstrual cramps.

If you find that taking the maximum dose of these medications doesn't provide full relief, you may need to try another approach to manage your signs and symptoms.

Hormone therapy

Supplemental hormones are sometimes effective in reducing or eliminating the pain of endometriosis. The rise and fall of hormones during the menstrual cycle causes endometrial implants to thicken, break down and bleed. Hormone medication may slow endometrial tissue growth and prevent new implants of endometrial tissue.

Hormone therapy isn't a permanent fix for endometriosis. You could experience a return of your symptoms after stopping treatment.

Therapies used to treat endometriosis include:

  • Hormonal contraceptives. Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings help control the hormones responsible for the buildup of endometrial tissue each month. Most women have lighter and shorter menstrual flow when they're using a hormonal contraceptive. Using hormonal contraceptives — especially continuous cycle regimens — may reduce or eliminate the pain of mild to moderate endometriosis.

  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists and antagonists. These drugs block the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, lowering estrogen levels and preventing menstruation. This causes endometrial tissue to shrink. Because these drugs create an artificial menopause, taking a low dose of estrogen or progestin along with Gn-RH agonists and antagonists may decrease menopausal side effects, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and bone loss. Your periods and the ability to get pregnant return when you stop taking the medication.

  • Progestin therapy. A progestin-only contraceptive, such as an intrauterine device (Mirena), contraceptive implant or contraceptive injection (Depo-Provera), can halt menstrual periods and the growth of endometrial implants, which may relieve endometriosis signs and symptoms.

  • Danazol. This drug suppresses the growth of the endometrium by blocking the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, preventing menstruation and the symptoms of endometriosis. However, danazol may not be the first choice because it can cause serious side effects and can be harmful to the baby if you become pregnant while taking this medication.

Conservative surgery

If you have endometriosis and are trying to become pregnant, surgery to remove as much endometriosis as possible while preserving your uterus and ovaries (conservative surgery) may increase your chances of success. If you have severe pain from endometriosis, you may also benefit from surgery — however, endometriosis and pain may return.

The doctor may do this procedure laparoscopically or through traditional abdominal surgery in more extensive cases.

Assisted reproductive technologies

Assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) to help you become pregnant are sometimes preferable to conservative surgery. Doctors often suggest one of these approaches if conservative surgery doesn't work. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.

2750 people found this helpful

I am 20 yrs girl. I will feel always tied and backache during my menses period plus normally I have digestion problem. Motion is not free to go. What can I do? I don't want tablets or any treatment. I need to clear by eating day to day foods so wat are the things I should add?

Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian (RD), PGDD, Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S), General Physician
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Mumbai
There are various causes affecting mensuration. You need to immediately consult me privately. I can prescribe some tests to identify the causes and treat accordingly.
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I am 29 weeks twin pregnancy. At present time in case delivery done have any problem?

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Delhi
I am 29 weeks twin pregnancy. At present time in case delivery done have any problem?
If delivered at 29 weeks your twins will be shifted to nicu (nursery. Nowadays with advancement of nursery care chances of survival at 29 weeks is good.
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I want to ask that I do sex with my partner without protective equipment. But after 48 hours later I give ipill to her. I have question that is there anything about worry. She is of 15. Plzz ans. Me.

D.E.H.M, B.E.M.S, M.D.(E.H)
Sexologist, Faridabad
If contraceptive pill has been taken on time as you have said. Then there is nothing to worry. For clarification may have strip test. Wish you good health.
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