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Dr. Manoj Kumar Nath

Homeopath, Delhi

200 at clinic
Dr. Manoj Kumar Nath Homeopath, Delhi
200 at clinic
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To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Manoj Kumar Nath
Dr. Manoj Kumar Nath is an experienced Homeopath in Lajpat Nagar, Delhi. He is currently associated with Deep Homoeopathic Clinic in Lajpat Nagar, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Manoj Kumar Nath on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Homeopaths in India. You will find Homeopaths with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Homeopaths online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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C-125, Dayanand Colony, Lajpath Nagar 4,Delhi Get Directions
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My friend is hypothyroid since age of 25 years for last 20 years. It resulted in mood swings and depression during this period causing lack of confidence. Please suggest something to overcome these symptoms. Thnx.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
My friend   is hypothyroid since age of 25 years for last 20 years. It resulted in mood swings and depression during ...
As you mentioned your friend has hypothyroidism, a deficiency of thyroxine in his circulation. This by itself may cause depressive symptoms or may aggravate an already present mood disorder like depression. He needs treatment for both hypothyroidism and depression. An optimum dose of thyroxine along with medications for depression should definitely help him out, For nay further queries you may consult me online
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Advanced Aesthetics
Ayurveda, Gulbarga
Premature ejaculation
What causes ejaculation problems?

Ejaculation problems are complex and can be caused by a number of things, including:

Stress
Relationship problems
Anxiety ? such as a man being anxious that he will lose his erection (erectile dysfunction), causing him to ?rush? the intercourse
Previous traumatic sexual experiences
Depression
Some medical conditions or medicines ? for example, diabetes can cause delayed ejaculation

Some researchers think certain men are more prone to premature ejaculation because of their biological make-up, such as having an unusually sensitive penis.

Retrograde ejaculation is caused by damage to nerves or muscles that surround the neck of the bladder (the point where the urethra connects to the bladder). This damage can often occur as a complication of prostate or bladder surgery.

Premature ejaculation is the most common ejaculation problem. It is where the male ejaculates too quickly during sexual intercourse.

Many men are unsure about how long ?normal? sex should last before ejaculation. A study looking at 500 couples from five different countries found the average time between a man putting his penis into his partner?s vagina and ejaculation was around five-and-a-half minutes.

However, it's up to the individual and his partner to decide whether or not they're happy with the time it takes for him to ejaculate. There is no definition of how long intercourse should last.

Occasional episodes of premature ejaculation are common and not a cause for concern. However, if you're finding that around half of your attempts to have intercourse result in premature ejaculation, it might help to get treatment.

Most men with this problem won't have always had it ? they'll have previously ejaculated normally. This may be referred to as 'secondary' premature ejaculation.

It's less common for the man to have always experienced premature ejaculation (since becoming sexually active) ? this is known as 'primary' or lifelong premature ejaculation. It affects around one in 50 men in England. In most cases of lifelong premature ejaculation:

There is an inability to delay ejaculation during sex every time or most times
The condition causes feelings of shame or frustration and impacts on quality of life, causing the man to avoid sexual intimacy

Delayed ejaculation

Delayed ejaculation (male orgasmic disorder) is classed as either:

Experiencing a significant delay before ejaculation is possible
Being unable to ejaculate at all even though the male wants to and his erection is normal

There is no set definition to describe ?how long is too long?, but a persistent (and unwanted) delay of ejaculation that lasts for 30 to 60 minutes may suggest delayed ejaculation.

Alternatively, if you are unable to achieve ejaculation at least half the times you have sex, you may have delayed ejaculation.

As with premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation can be either acquired or lifelong. Lifelong delayed ejaculation is less common and affects an estimated one in 1,000 men.

Delayed ejaculation can occur in all sexual situations, or just in certain situations ? for example, you may be able to ejaculate normally when masturbating, but not during sex. When delayed ejaculation only happens in certain situations, there's usually a psychological cause.
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I am eating everything that is nutritious and good for weight gaining but my weight is nit increasing from last 5-6 years. What should be a problem? What can I do?

BHMS, MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Delhi
I am eating everything that is nutritious and good for weight gaining but my weight is nit increasing from last 5-6 y...
Do stretching exercise alternates days. Take high protein and high calories diet. Take milk nd milk products. Take after dinner any sweet item take soya milk, paneer,tofu.
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She always having a complaint of body pain for that she is taking combiflam which is not good for the body and she also have b. P. So what to do so her this problem get solved.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
She always having a complaint of body pain for that she is taking combiflam which is not good for the body and she al...
Hello, take Rauvolfia 1x, 2 tabs once daily in the morning . BC NO 27 , 5 tabs twice daily and Alfavena malt , 2 tsp twice daily. Revert me after 15 days.
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I have dry cough since 3 weeks I have taken ascoril syrup for 3 days still I have severe cough.?

MBBS, DNB, Diploma Dyslipidemia, CCEBDM, CCMTD
General Physician, Gurgaon
Dear lybrate user with the limited amount of information available we can very well understand your concern for your cough. It could had been better if you had explained in detail of you have any sort of allergy issues and if you loose breath on walking. Are you having fever? this could be signs of allergic bronchitis. As your cough is present for past 3 weeks it will be advisable if you can get your blood counts done along with a x ray for the time being you can start taking steam thrice daily. Revert with reports so that we can advise you better.
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I am 27 years old I have many hole and bad sign on my face it give me pain when I touch it please give me a way, please.

BAMS
Ayurveda, Ambala
I am 27 years old I have many hole and bad sign on my face it give me pain when I touch it please give me a way, please.
A good nutrition and exercises which increase the blood circulation (flow) on and near the areas of pores will definately help you to remove the pores and marks on face. There are methods and instructions which give relief you from pores & marks. * Eat healthy diet daily. * Eat 20 gm of soyabean cereal daily it contains protein which help in regeneration (making of new skin) of skin on the holes. * Eat an apple daily. It has vitamins that provide sufficient nutrition to the skin. You can drink a glass of carrot juice daily. * Drink 1/2 lime juice daily. It contains vitamin C good for your skin. * Drink a glass of milk with one teaspoon of MALTOVA POWDER daily at night. * Do jogging for 5 minutes daily. Increase the time of jogging daily with one to two minutes. It increase circulation and flow more blood towards the pores and make them heal earlier. * Do neck massage with oil in upward motion. * For apply on pores do these methods on your face so do this method stepwise: • Steam your face for 3 to 4 minutes. After steaming your face then apply fresh aloevera plant gel on your face leave for 5 minutes then rinse off with water. After this apply rose water on your face. * Apply one vitamin E capsule (Capsule Evion 400 mg) mix with moisturizer on your face. *Take 10 ml of MAHAMANJISTHARISHTA of Baidyanath company and add it in a glass of water and drink it once a day for 4 weeks.
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I am 53 yrs, male, having diabetes & bp. Advice some remedies.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath,
Do walk daily take less salt and sweets reduce your stress levels take homoeopathy medicine syziumzambolicum mother tincture and aurummet200.
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If the bp come highly in one time than after that I have 2 used regular ly BP tables.

PG Diploma in Emergency Medicine Services (PGDEMS), Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MD - Alternate Medicine
Ayurveda, Ghaziabad
If the bp come highly in one time than after that I have 2 used regular ly BP tables.
In ayurveda, Hypertension is referred to as Rakta Capa Vriddhi and it sees the vitiation of vata and pitta doshas as the main cause...take sarpgandha vati twice a day...yogendra ras...akik bhasm works very good in case of hypertension....avoid salty diet...oily food...lower your stress...do pranayama early morning...
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i am suffering from headache how can i get relaxed

General Physician,
i am suffering from headache how can i get relaxed
Take crocin pain relief one sos, get your BP checked, get your eye sight checked,take proper sleep and diet. consult again if not ok.
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I am 22 year old girl, I have many tiny pores on my face which is filled by white heads instantly. please tell me durable and if possible natural remedy.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
I am 22 year old girl, I have many tiny pores on my face which is filled by white heads instantly. please tell me dur...
Hi. Wash your face with Bakson's Facewash (wash your face with warm water only) and followed by CTMP, i.e., cleansing, toning, moisturising and protection (apply liberally Sunscreen Gel with SPF-30) after washing your face daily. Home-made remedies: - Take 1 tbsp of fuller's earth (multani mitti) + a dash of lime + bit of rosewater – apply this on your face till it gets dried up, then rinse it off. - Take 1 tsp of Alum (or fitkari), make it slightly wet with water and apply this on your wet face, spread it well; let it dry and rinse it off. Alum remove your excessive moisture or oil and it also tightens the skin's tonicity. Medication: You can take homoeopathic medicines – Berberis Aquefolium Q/ 10 drops in 1/2 cup of water/ thrice a day (and for local application as well) and Kali Brom. 200/ thrice a day – for 20 days. Also, use Bakson’s Apricot scrub 1-2times a week on the area.
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I do workout every day so I want gain mass. My weight normal with my BMI. So please suggest me proper medicine.

CGO, BHMS (Silver Medalist)
Homeopath, Noida
I do workout every day so I want gain mass. My weight normal with my BMI. So please suggest me proper medicine.
Hi, exercise is the best way to gain muscle mass. Daily requirement of protein in a boy is around 52 gms. This amount you can easily get from your daily serving of food like: 1) eggs, 2) legumes-peas, beans and pulses 3) soyabean (nutrella) 4) fish, chicken, meat 5) nuts-peanuts, almonds 6) low fat milk and curd we've all heard the myth that extra protein builds more mujscle. In fact, the only way to build muscle is through exercise. Bodies need a modest amount of protein to function well. Let me explain. For active, working-out individuals one has to consume around 2 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. Ie. If your weight is 70 kg, then you require 140 gms protein daily if you are into gymming. But if you are a sedentary persons, your daily requirement is just 0.8 gms per kg body weight ie. 56 gms which we easily get from our daily food. I hope this answers your query.
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I want to reduce my eye number. Am not able to see properly while am remove my specs.

DO , DOMS
Ophthalmologist, Kanpur
I want to reduce my eye number. Am not able to see properly while am remove my specs.
In myopia (sort sightedness) no increases with age while in hypermetropia. It may reduce with age (say 15- 16 years of age). Its perfectly natural that if you have refractive eror you will have to wear proper glasses. So don't worry about reducing the number.
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I am applying a cream which is eveglow. It contains hydroquinone usp, tretinoin usp and mometasone furoate ip. Is it safe for face?

Advanced Aesthetics
Ayurveda, Gulbarga
I am applying a cream which is eveglow. It contains hydroquinone usp, tretinoin usp and mometasone furoate ip. Is it ...
Its side effects is more use only this ointment once in 24hors only 1-2 hours on skin later facewash. And use in day time any sunscreen spf30+ before 30min going out.
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Dear sir/mam I have a niece about 8 months now, She is suffering form cold from one month, Last week, a kind of puss was in her ears. When we consulted a doc. He said that it is due to the cold and we were giving her milk with her head laid down due to which some milk may have gone to her ears. She is taking medicines as well from last 3 weeks but it is not helping out. What should we do? We only give her milk and some times banana to eat. What else can we give her to eat, She has now got 2 teeth from both upper and lower jaw. Please help.

Certificate in Basic Course on Diabetes Management, CCEBDM Certificate in Diabetes, MBBS
General Physician, Pune
Dear sir/mam I have a niece about 8 months now,
She is suffering form cold from one month,
Last week, a kind of puss ...
I don't think milk has anything to do. Pus in ear is because either by cold spreading to middle ear and secretion getting infected or else middle ear infection. Either way damaging the membrane. Now you have to keep the ears clean by cotton swab. No water inside during bathing, no oil or ear drops. You should consult ent specialist for direct examination, diagnosis treatment for congestion and infection.
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I have a great hairfall used various shampoos but can't control it need a permanent solution.

Vaidya Visharad
Ayurveda, Narnaul
I have a great hairfall used various shampoos but can't control it need a permanent solution.
Leafy vegetables, such as Swiss chard, cabbage and watercress, contain a small amount of MSM. Raw vegetables contain a higher amount than cooked vegetables because heat causes some of the msm to volatilize. However, you still receive some when you eat cooked asparagus or beets. Those who like to eat alfalfa also receive MSM when ingesting its nutritious leaves.
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I'm fair but some parts of my body (back, but, waist) are got black how to get clean it.

MBBS, MD - MD- Skin & VD
Dermatologist, Ahmedabad
I'm fair but some parts of my body (back, but, waist) are got black how to get clean it.
You can go for skin polishing treatment at a dermatologist's clinic. At home you can apply gram flour-yogurt-turmeric paste on the areas. It will take time to lighten. You can start using body whitening cream regularly.
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I have small mouth opening from last 4 years. What can I do for increase my mouth opening?

BDS
Dentist, Gurgaon
I have small mouth opening from last 4 years. What can I do for increase my mouth opening?
mouth opening restriction can be caused by many reasons. wether it is due to trauma or wisdom tooth impaction or due to extensive tobacco used. so we have to look out for d cause and den will decide the treatment plan. thanx
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I am 18 years old Sometimes I feel pain in the back area of my head and neck What should I do?

MBBS, MBA (Healthcare)
General Physician, Delhi
I am 18 years old
Sometimes I feel pain in the back area of my head and neck
What should I do?
apply volini gel on neck. do warm fomentation. do neck muscle exercises. avoid high pillow.consult if not ok.
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.
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My son aged 9 years is having fever since yesterday along with loose motions. What medicine can he take?

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
My son aged 9 years is having fever since yesterday along with loose motions. What medicine can he take?
It may due to viral infection. If stool simple loose without mucus and blood, give paracetamol 500 mg 8 hourly, liquid/ water in plenty, ors may be given if he likes. Continue light diet with curd. If condition does not improve or deteriorate, consult doctor.
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90%
(514 ratings)

Dr. Sumit Dhawan

BHMS, MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath
Glower, 
250 at clinic
Book Appointment
88%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Suchindra Sachdeva

BHMS
Homeopath
Dr. Suchindra Sachdeva's Clinic, 
200 at clinic
Book Appointment
90%
(81 ratings)

Dr. Vandana Mittal

BHMS
Homeopath
Dr Vandana Mittal Clinic, 
200 at clinic
Book Appointment
87%
(70 ratings)

Dr. Ankush Rai

BHMS, BHMS
Homeopath
Dr Mehtab Rai Polyclinic, 
200 at clinic
Book Appointment
89%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Ishu Garg

BHMS
Homeopath
Dr. Dhawan's Medicentre, 
200 at clinic
Book Appointment