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Dr. Kiran Monga

Pediatrician, Delhi

600 at clinic
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Dr. Kiran Monga Pediatrician, Delhi
600 at clinic
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My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. Kiran Monga
Dr. Kiran Monga is one of the best Pediatricians in Ashok Vihar, Delhi. He is currently practising at Dr. Monga's Clinic in Ashok Vihar, Delhi. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Kiran Monga on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Plot No. H251, Ashok Vihar Phase 1. Landmark: Near Mont Fort School, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
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My son is a adhd kid. He has some speech delay also. What is the best way to treat him. Are there any special schools for him.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Stimulants such as methylphenidate and amphetamines are the most common type of medication used for treating adhd. Although it may seem counterintuitive to treat hyperactivity with a stimulant, these medications actually activate brain circuits that support attention and focused behavior, thus reducing hyperactivity. In addition, a few non-stimulant medications, such as atomoxetine, guanfacine, and clonidine, are also available. For many children, adhd medications reduce hyperactivity and impulsivity and improve their ability to focus, work, and learn. Medications also may improve physical coordination. However, a one-size-fits-all approach does not apply for all children with adhd. What works for one child might not work for another. One child might have side effects with a certain medication, while another child may not. Sometimes several different medications or dosages must be tried before finding one that works for a particular child. Any child taking medications must be monitored closely and carefully by caregivers and doctors. Stimulant medications come in different forms, such as a pill, capsule, liquid, or skin patch. Some medications also come in short-acting, long-acting, or extended release varieties. In each of these varieties, the active ingredient is the same, but it is released differently in the body. Long-acting or extended release forms often allow a child to take the medication just once a day before school, so he or she doesn't have to make a daily trip to the school nurse for another dose. Parents and doctors should decide together which medication is best for the child and whether the child needs medication only for school hours or for evenings and weekends, too. For more information about stimulants and other medications used for treating mental disorders, see the nimh mental health medications webpage. The food and drug administration (fda) website has the latest information on medication approvals, warnings, and patient information guides. What are the side effects of stimulant medications? the most commonly reported side effects are decreased appetite, sleep problems, anxiety, and irritability. Some children also report mild stomachaches or headaches. Most side effects are minor and disappear over time or if the dosage level is lowered. Decreased appetite. Be sure your child eats healthy meals. If this side effect does not go away, talk to your child's doctor. Also talk to the doctor if you have concerns about your child's growth or weight gain while he or she is taking this medication. Sleep problems. If a child cannot fall asleep, the doctor may prescribe a lower dose of the medication or a shorter-acting form. The doctor might also suggest giving the medication earlier in the day, or stopping the afternoon or evening dose. Adding a prescription for a low dose of a blood pressure medication called clonidine sometimes helps with sleep problems. A consistent sleep routine that includes relaxing elements like warm milk, soft music, or quiet activities in dim light, may also help. Less common side effects. A few children develop sudden, repetitive movements or sounds called tics. Changing the medication dosage may make tics go away. Some children also may have a personality change, such as appearing" flat" or without emotion. Talk with your child's doctor if you see any of these side effects. You can ask for special schools in your area.
4 people found this helpful

Good morning. My daughter is 6 years old and in first standard, she has problem of frequently urine (20 to 25) per day. What should we do?

Master in Psychology, MD - Ayurveda, Dems, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Ghaziabad
Good morning. My daughter is 6 years old and in first standard, she has problem of frequently urine (20 to 25) per da...
Your daughter needs proper examination before starting any treatment. She may be suffering from urine infection or over active bladder.

Perthes Disease In Children - What Can Possibly Lead To It?

MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Thane
Perthes Disease In Children - What Can Possibly Lead To It?

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.

All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.

Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

2634 people found this helpful

My son is 6 years old he repeat the things again & again if I purchased fruits for him he ask me again & again mom I can eat but it will finish & if he found qty less than do not eat when we purchase again than he will eat and dont want to eat anybody. Every time intrested to go my old house and dont want to go any other city. He is studying class 1st getting good marks 80% but some times forget same thing again & again he is like singing music. Many time ask same thing again & again so pls suggest what should I do for his better future.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear , please don't try to exaggerate the condition. Simple repetition and low frequency is of no problem. If you present these symptoms to a psychologist near you, he may suspect obsessive compulsive disorder. Before that I would like to talk to you. Please post a private question to me. Take care.

61 days have passed since my daughter's birth. I only give cow milk to my daughter. Sometimes my daughter is frequently vomiting. What is the reason for vomiting. How prevention of vomiting.

B.A.M.S., B.A.M.S.-Dip.C.H.
Pediatrician, Solapur
61 days have passed since my daughter's birth. I only give cow milk to my daughter. Sometimes my daughter is frequent...
If possible give her breast milk/breast feed. After feeding burping is must. And with this give her some antiemetic drugs.
1 person found this helpful

Breastfeeding Problems - Possible Reasons Behind It!

MBBS, MD
Gynaecologist, Delhi
Breastfeeding Problems - Possible Reasons Behind It!

Breastfeeding is universally recognized as the best way to feed an infant because it protects mother and infant from a variety of health problems. Even so, many women who start out breastfeeding stop before the recommended minimum of exclusive breastfeeding for six months. Often women stop because common problems interfere with their ability to breastfeed. Luckily, with sound guidance and appropriate medical treatment, most women can overcome these obstacles and continue breastfeeding for longer periods.

The most common reason women stop breastfeeding is that they think their infant is not getting enough milk, but in many cases the mother has an adequate supply. A true inadequate supply can happen if the infant is unable to extract milk well or if the mother doesn't make enough milk. Unfortunately, figuring out if a mother has enough milk and if not, why not, can be challenging.

Inadequate milk production — There are a number of reasons why a mother might not make enough milk, including that:

  1. Her breasts did not develop sufficiently during pregnancy – This can happen if she doesn't have enough milk-producing tissue (called glandular tissue)
  2. She previously had breast surgery or radiation treatment.
  3. She has a hormonal imbalance.
  4. She takes certain medications that interfere with milk production.

Women who have had breast surgery, such a breast augmentation or breast reduction surgery, often have trouble making enough milk. For some, breastfeeding is impossible. If you had breast surgery, ask a healthcare provider if the type of surgery you had would totally interfere with breastfeeding. If not, or if you are unable to get complete information on your surgery, do go ahead and try, but make sure your healthcare provider closely monitors your baby's progress.

Poor milk extraction — The most common reasons infants have trouble getting enough milk are:

  1. They do not get fed frequently enough (which can cause milk production to slow or stop).
  2. They cannot latch on properly They are separated from their mother too much.
  3. They are fed formula.

Babies are sleepy and it is difficult to keep them awake during the first several days after birth. This can prevent the baby from getting enough to eat. Other babies can have trouble controlling the muscles involved in suckling, which makes it hard for them to extract milk. Feeding difficulty is especially common among premature and late preterm babies. Many mothers judge adequacy of feeding by lack of crying. This can be misleading if the baby is not getting enough milk and is overly sleepy.

Diagnosis of inadequate intake — Healthcare providers determine whether a baby is getting enough milk based on the following:

Number of feeding sessions the mother reports having – During the first week of life, mothers with term infants (meaning they are not premature) generally nurse 8 to 12 times in 24 hours. By four weeks after delivery, nursing usually decreases to seven to nine times per day.

Amount of urine and stool the baby makes – By the fifth day of life, infants who are getting enough milk urinate six to eight times a day and have three or more stools a day. (Once a mother's milk comes in, her infant's stool should be pale yellow and seedy.)

Weight of the baby – Term infants lose an average of 7 percent of their birth weight in the first three to five days of life. They typically get back to their birth weight within one to two weeks. Once a mother's breasts fill with milk – by day three to five – her infant should not keep losing weight. If an infant has lost 10 percent of its weight or fails to return to its birth weight when expected, healthcare providers start to explore potential problems. Household scales are not accurate enough to detect these small weight differences. If you are using a medical scale for infants, remember to weigh the infant with the same clothes and diaper before and after the feeding.

Management of inadequate intake — If your healthcare provider suspects your baby is not getting enough milk, he or she will want to figure out why. To do that, the healthcare provider will ask you about your experiences breastfeeding and about your and your baby's medical history. A healthcare provider should also watch as you try to breastfeed to see if there could be something wrong with the way your baby latches on or with the baby's mouth. If so, it will be important for you to learn how to position your baby so that the baby can latch on properly .If you are having trouble with this, the healthcare provider will direct you to community resources − often a lactation consultant − for assistance.

If your baby has a good latch, but you still have problems with inadequate milk intake, your healthcare provider might suggest that you try to feed more often or try to stimulate more milk production by using a breast pump or expressing by hand.

There are medications called galactagogues (or lactagogues) that supposedly increase milk production, but it's unclear whether these medications actually work and whether they are safe for a nursing baby, so we do not recommend their use.

Nipple & Breast Pain

The second most common reason mothers stop breastfeeding early is nipple or breast pain.

The causes of nipple and breast pain include:

  1. Nipple injury (caused by the baby or a breast pump)
  2. Engorgement, which means the breasts get overly full
  3. Plugged milk ducts
  4. Nipple and breast infections
  5. Excessive milk supply
  6. Skin disorders (such as dermatitis or psoriasis) affecting the nipple
  7. Nipple vasoconstriction, which means the blood vessels in the nipple tighten and do not let enough blood through

Possible causes of breast or nipple pain related to the baby could include:

Ankyloglossia (also called tongue-tie), which is when the baby's tongue cannot move as freely as it should, making it hard for the baby to suckle effectively

To determine the cause of your pain, your healthcare provider will examine you and your baby, and watch you breastfeed. He or she will also ask about your pain (when it started, what makes it better or worse), and about aspects of your health that could hold clues about the cause of your pain.

The most important part of the exam takes place when the healthcare provider watches you breastfeed. That's because most cases of breast pain in the nursing mother are due to incorrect breastfeeding technique. One common problem is that the baby is not latching on properly, and so injures the nipple, but also cannot empty the breast. This, in turn, can lead to engorgement, plugged ducts, and breast infections.

Nipple pain — Sore nipples are one of the most common complaints by new mothers. Pain due to nipple injury needs to be distinguished from nipple sensitivity, which normally increases during pregnancy and peaks about four days after giving birth.

You can usually tell the difference between normal nipple sensitivity and pain caused by nipple injury based on when it happens and how it changes over time. Normal sensitivity typically subsides 30 seconds after suckling begins. It also diminishes on the fourth day after giving birth and completely resolves when the baby is about a week old. Nipple pain caused by trauma, on the other hand, persists or gets worse after suckling begins. Severe pain or pain that continues after the first week after birth is more likely to be due to nipple injury.

Nipple injury — Nipple injury usually is due to incorrect breastfeeding technique, particularly poor position or latch-on. Other factors that can make pain caused by injury worse include harsh breast cleansing, use of potentially irritating products, and biting by an older infant.

If your baby is biting you, position the baby so that his or her mouth is wide open during feedings. That will make it harder to bite. Also, stick your finger between your nipple and the baby's mouth any time he or she bites you and firmly say "no." Then put the baby down in a safe place. The baby will learn not to bite you.

Engorgement — Engorgement is the medical term for when the breasts get too full of milk. It can make your breast feel full and firm and can cause pain and tenderness. Engorgement can sometimes impair the baby's ability to latch, which makes engorgement worse, because the baby cannot then empty the breast.

If the engorgement makes it hard for your baby to latch on, manually express a small amount of milk before each feeding to soften your areola and make it easier for the baby to latch on .To do this, place your thumb and forefingers well behind your areola (close to your chest) and then compress them together and toward your nipple in a rhythmic fashion. You can also use your hand to present your nipple in a way that is easier to latch and to help get milk out for the baby while the baby is suckling.

You can use a breast pump to help soften your breast before a feeding, but be careful not to do it too much. Using a pump too much will stimulate your breast to make even more milk, which will make engorgement worse.

Breast Infections

Lactational mastitis — Mastitis is an inflammation of the breast that is often associated with fever (which might be masked by pain medications), muscle and breast pain, and redness. It is not always caused by an infection, but most people associate it with infection. Mastitis can happen at any time during lactation, but it is most common during the first six weeks after delivery.

Mastitis tends to occur if the nipples are damaged or the breasts stay engorged for too long or do not drain properly. To prevent and treat mastitis, it's important to get these problems under control.

MILK OVERSUPPLY

Some mothers make too much milk, which paradoxically can make breastfeeding difficult. Generally the production of milk is determined by the infant's demand, but in this case the supply exceeds demand. The problem begins early in lactation and is most common among women having their first child.

In women with an oversupply of milk, the rush of the milk can be so strong that it causes the infant to choke and cough and have trouble feeding, or even to bite down to clamp the nipple. Infants whose mothers make too much milk can either gain weight quickly or gain too little weight because they cannot handle the flow of milk, or because they do not get the last of the milk in the breast, which has the most calories.

If you have a problem with overproduction, don't worry. The problem usually goes away on its own. But tell your healthcare provider about it, so he or she can check whether you have any hormonal imbalances or take any medications that could make the problems worse.

WHEN TO SEEK HELP

If you are unable to breastfeed due to engorgement, pain, or difficulty latching your infant, help is available. Talk to your obstetrical or pediatric healthcare provider, nurse, lactation consultant, or a breastfeeding counselor.

Contraceptive methods of birth control are usually quite successful. By  these methods, you can enjoy your sex without the worry of pregnancy. Modern technology has led to the formulation of avid techniques of contraception; some are temporary and the others permanent. However, no matter how well these methods work, almost all of them have got a variety of side effects on your body and health.
Here is a list of different modes of contraception and the side effects they may cause:

Hormonal implants
This long term method of birth control is an effective one. The side effects are:

  1. A surgery is required where rods are inserted under your skin. This might be risky surgery.
  2. If you want to remove it, again another surgery has to be carried out.
  3. An Infection may develop in the area where the thin rods are inserted.

Intra Uterine Device
A device is fitted into the uterus, which does not cause pregnancy. An effective method with the following side effects:

  1. There is a risk of the device falling off.
  2. This causes puncture in the uterus.
  3. The device made of copper may lead to menstrual cramps and spotting.

Depo Provera Hormonal Injection
This mode of contraception involves taking an injection, which restricts pregnancy for a period of three months. The side effects are:

  1. Gaining of extra weight, fatigue.
  2. Decrease of bone density.
  3. Menstrual bleeding along with spotting takes place.

Birth Control Pills
Birth control pills are one of the most common and most effective ways of birth control or contraception. However, several side effects may be observed.

  1. Causes nausea, headaches and also blood clots in rare cases.
  2. In case you use other prescribed medicines along with birth control pills, severe damage may be inflicted.

Vaginal Ring
This mode of contraception is very effective. It also helps in making menstrual periods of women much lighter and in continuity. The side effects are:

  1. May cause nausea and headache.
  2. There is a vast increase in appetite
  3. There is a risk of blood clot formation.

Diaphragm
A very successful mode of contraception where a diaphragm is inserted and fitted into the vagina. The negatives of this mode are:

  1. It may get out of place during sex and is likely to cause damage
  2. The process can be a mess
  3. Causes urinary infections

All modes of contraception irrespective of their effectiveness have got some side effects on your health. Hence, you must choose them wisely.

4998 people found this helpful

My son is having a cough n cold n fever since two days I have given him vikoryl due to which fever has gone n to some extent even cold is also gone but cough is accumulated in the chest kindly suggest me some home remedies or medicine to remove the cough from the chest.

BHMS
Homeopath,
My son is having a cough n cold n fever since two days I have given him vikoryl due to which fever has gone n to some...
You should get the chest auscultated(thought stethoscope) from s general practitioner or a paediatrician. It's not good to allow cough to accumulate as infants are prone to pneumonia very often.uou can give him warm fomentations and some steam.
1 person found this helpful
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