Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Karuna Thakur

Psychologist, Delhi

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Karuna Thakur Psychologist, Delhi
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Karuna Thakur
Dr. Karuna Thakur is an experienced Psychologist in Okhla, Delhi. You can consult Dr. Karuna Thakur at Holy Family Hospital in Okhla, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Karuna Thakur and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Psychologists in India. You will find Psychologists with more than 26 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychologists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Karuna Thakur

Holy Family Hospital

Maulana Mohammad Ali Road, Okhala. Landmark: Opp Sccot Hospital and Near Surya Hotal, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Karuna Thakur

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I am going to be married this year I had done some sex with males. Now I just want to know that it will not impact on my married life or how can I come out homosexuality. Or I have to continue the sex with male after marriage.

DNB (Psychiatry), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Mumbai
I am going to be married this year I had done some sex with males. Now I just want to know that it will not impact on...
It's completely your decision to continue having bisexual relationships but be ready to face consequences if ever your spouse knows about it. Homosexuality or bisexuality is a lifestyle and not a psychiatric disorder. To come out of homosexuality you have to decide for yourself what lifestyle you would like to choose, it becomes difficult when family and society don't accept the lifestyle. A homosexual or bisexual has no less dignity than others but most of these have anxiety or depression related to their orientation. These thoughts of anxiety and depression can be resolved by a psychiatrist or counselor.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dad drunk the alcohol too much for 4 days in function now he is mentally distributed. And thinking to something to do harm him. Went to consultant he suggested some medicine used those tablets without giving any amount of alcohol. Now his body is shaking how to control it and when he will be fine if he takes tablets his age is 53.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
My dad drunk the alcohol too much for 4 days in function now he is mentally distributed. And thinking to something to...
He should admit him to a hospital for detoxification. It takes only two weeks at the most and he will come out clean and fresh. I cannot believe that in one attempt he drank so much to be affected thus. Even if it is so, he can go throgh detoxification with some counseling and find out eh exact reason in the bargain and addres that too.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I can't focus on study that is my big problem how can I stay focused on my study.

Diploma In Gastroenterology, Diploma In Dermatology, BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
study tips to help you stay focused: Set study goals. First things first; start with the basics and set your study goals. ... 2. Make a study timetable. Once you know what you want, the next step is to prepare a weekly study timetable. ... Learn to say no. ... Stay focused on your priorities. ... 2 Comments.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 25 year old, I am suffering from stammering from childhood, these create nervousness and depression, lack of confidence in me, suggest me what should I do?

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
Stammering is typically recognised by a tense struggle to get words out. This makes it different from the normal non-fluency we all experience which includes hesitations and repetitions. Commonly it involves repeating or prolonging sounds or words, or getting stuck without any sound (silent blocking). Sometimes people put in extra sounds or words. Often people lose eye contact. Some people who stammer talk their way round difficult words so that you may not realise they stammer at all. This avoidance of words, and avoidance of speaking in some or many situations, is an important aspect of stammering. Stammering varies tremendously from person to person and is highly variable for the person who stammers who may be fluent one minute and struggling to speak the next. Get an mri brain and eeg with a psychiatrist evaluation.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir I have a 10year old daughter studying in V. Shez complaining lack of concentration.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hello, There are few food items which helps in boosting up the memory power, increases focus & concentration, so try to take more of these: 1.Choline: Good sources of choline include liver, milk, eggs and peanuts. 2.Vitamin B: B vitamins are not synthesized in the body, and thus need to be obtained from food. B-complex vitamins are water-soluble vitamins, which means that they are not stored within the body. In consequence, the B vitamins need ongoing replenishment. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) rich sources include unrefined grain products, ready-to-eat cereals, meat (especially pork), dairy products, peanuts, legumes, fruits and eggs. Foods that contain high concentrations of vitamin B3 (niacin) in the free form include beans and organ meat, as well as enriched grain and cereal products. While niacin is present in corn and other grains, the bioavailability of the nutrient is much less than it is in protein-rich sources. The role of vitamin B9 (folic acid) during pregnancy is vital to normal development of the nervous system in the fetus. Good sources of folate include liver, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, beans, asparagus, spinach, broccoli, and orange juice.Animal protein products are a good source of vitamin B12 (cobalamine), particularly organ meats such as kidney or liver. Other good sources are fish, eggs, and dairy products. 3.Vitamin A: The foods highest in Vitamin A are any pigmented fruits and vegetables and leafy green vegetables. 4.Zinc: Zinc is a very important part of the brain as well; many regions of the brain, such as the cerebellum, and hippocampus have neurons that contain this nutrient.Zinc is needed to maintain normal Vitamin A levels in blood plasma. Sources of zinc are meats, certain seafood, whole grains, baked beans, oatmeal, milk (low-fat), cashewnut, almonds, kidney-beans, cheese, peas, spinach, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds. Medication: Take homoeopathic medicine for increasing memory - Anacardium 200/ once daily.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello. I am 18 Year Old college student. I am an introvert and I don't prefer so much socializing but when I try to my friends behave such that I would prefer to be alone. My family is not so supportive. They tell me am kinda crazy and they don't understand my feelings. I can't even buy a pet as they won't allow and I was totally detached from my hobbies as they always prefer me seeing in studies other than painting. My friends are enjoying their holiday .going to shopping malls and buying Christmas gifts. They look like they are enjoying and I see their pics I feel sad. My parents don't allow me go out, hang out with friends and I feel. So suffocated sometimes. I feel so much crying I can't imagine .i don't know what to do now. Am really fed up. Am suffering like hell. If I scream to them they tell me that I have no sense and am just a waste of money.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
Hello. I am 18 Year Old college student. I am an introvert and I don't prefer so much socializing but when I try to m...
Dear user. I can understand. You are YOU. Whatever your behavior today, whatever your body language today are learned from your past experiences and social interactions. Whatever you have learned can be unlearned or over written. This is a continuous process happening throughout your life. I suggest cognitive behavior therapy for you. Take care.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Dyslexia - Warning Signs And Symptoms In Children!

MBBS, DNB (PSYCHIATRY), PG Diploma In Clinical Cosmetology (PGDCC)
Dermatologist, Delhi
Dyslexia - Warning Signs And Symptoms In Children!

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  1. Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten
  2. Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet
  3. Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make
  4. Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat
  5. Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'
  6. Has difficulty learning new words
  7. Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age
  8. Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences
  9. Has trouble rhyming

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School-

  1. Struggles with reading and spelling
  2. Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'
  3. Has trouble remembering facts and numbers
  4. Has difficulty gripping a pencil
  5. Has difficulty using proper grammar
  6. Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization
  7. Gets tripped up by word problems in math
  8. Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words
  9. Has trouble following a sequence of directions

Warning Signs in High School-

  1. Struggles with reading out loud
  2. Doesn't read at the expected grade level
  3. Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms
  4. Has difficulty organizing and managing time
  5. Struggles to summarize a story
  6. Has difficulty learning a foreign language

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia-

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:

General:

  • Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.
  • Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."
  • Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.
  • High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.
  • Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.
  • Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.
  • Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.
  • Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."
  • Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  • Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.
  • Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.
  • Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.
  • Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.
  • Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.
  • Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  • Spells phonetically and inconsistently.
  • Hearing and Speech Skills
  • Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.
  • Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.

Writing and Motor Skills:

  • Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.
  • Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.
  • Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.
  • Math and Time Management Skills
  • Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.
  • Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.
  • Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.
  • Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.

Memory and Cognition:

  • Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.
  • Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.
  • Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).
  • Behavior, Health, Development and Personality
  • Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.
  • Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.
  • Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).
  • Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.
  • Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.
  • Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.
  • Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  1. Read out loud every day
  2. Tap into your child's interests
  3. Use audiobooks
  4. Look for apps and other high-tech help
  5. Focus on effort, not outcome
  6. Make your home reader-friendly
  7. Boost confidence

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  1. Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.
  2. Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.
  3. Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life.

3 people found this helpful
View All Feed

Near By Doctors

89%
(29 ratings)

Ms. Anu Gehlot

M.Phil - Psychology, Masters In Psychology, BA-Psychology
Psychologist
Sant Parmanand Hospital, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
83%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Shruti Jain

Phd - Psychology, MA- Psychology, BA Hons.Psychology
Psychologist
Life Coach Dr. Shruti Jain Clinic, 
350 at clinic
Book Appointment
84%
(10 ratings)

Dr. G B Singh

Consultant Dyslexia, Autism & Child Psychologist. Consultant Clinical & Mental Health Psychologist., Post Masters Doc in Behavioural Medicine , Post Masters Doc Psychology
Psychologist
Dyslexia Consultation Centre, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
92%
(52 ratings)

Dr. Shraddha Banerjee

M.Phil - Clinical Psychology, Bsc - Psychology, Msc - Applied Psychology
Psychologist
Dr.Shraddha Banerjee Clinic, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
83%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Vrinda Bajaj

Master In Counselling Psychology, Clinical Hypnotherapy, Certified Life Coach
Psychologist
Awakenings The Mind Spa, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment
92%
(10 ratings)

Dr. Naresh Mishra

MA - Psychology
Psychologist
Mind psychological Center, 
300 at clinic
Book Appointment