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Dr. K C Kapoor

Veterinarian, Delhi

Dr. K C Kapoor Veterinarian, Delhi
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. K C Kapoor
Dr. K C Kapoor is a popular Veterinarian in Sarita Vihar, Delhi. You can consult Dr. K C Kapoor at Dog Clinic in Sarita Vihar, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. K C Kapoor on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Indian Veterinary Association

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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Why spay or neuter?
Every year, millions of unwanted dogs and cats, including puppies and kittens, are ORPHANED, END UP BECOMING MALNOURISHED, ROAM ON STREETS AND ARE PRONE TO ACCIDENTAL DEATHS. The good news is that RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERS can make a difference. By having your dog or cat sterilized, you will do your part to prevent the birth of unwanted puppies and kittens. Spaying and neutering prevent unwanted litters and may reduce many of the behavioural problems associated with the mating instinct.
Spaying eliminates heat cycles and generally reduces the unwanted behaviours that may lead to owner frustration. Neutering male dogs and cats reduces the breeding instinct and can have a calming effect, making them less inclined to roam and more content to stay at home.
Early spaying of female dogs and cats can help PROTECT THEM FROM some serious health problems later in life such as UTERINE INFECTIONS AND BREAST CANCER. Neutering your male pet can also lessen its risk of developing BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA (ENLARGED PROSTATE GLAND) AND TESTICULAR CANCER.
The procedure has NO EFFECT ON A PET'S INTELLIGENCE OR ABILITY TO LEARN, PLAY, WORK OR HUNT. Most pets tend to be better behaved following surgical removal of their ovaries or testes, making them more desirable companions.

When to spay or neuter:
Talk to us about the most appropriate time to spay or neuter your pet based upon its breed, age and physical condition. Keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, it may NOT be best to wait until your female dog or cat has gone through its first heat cycle.

Side effects of spaying/neutering:
The common myth is that pets put on weight after neutering, which up to an extent is true. Neutering reduces the BMR – Basal Metabolic Rate of the pets. However, as long as the diet and exercise if kept proper – pets DO NOT put on exorbitant weight. Urinary incontinence is another side effect observed in older females sterilized in older age. However, the side effects certainly do not weigh more than the benefits of spaying or neutering.
Discuss about this in detail with us, on your next visit. BE A RESPONSIBLE PET PARENT – NEUTER/SPAY YOUR PETS!!!
3 people found this helpful

Hello. I have a pet dog 9 years old. Kindly suggest what should we give him to eat and what not?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
Normal routine diet is recommended as the dog is feeling well you can ho for branded feeds or for home made ration as which you eat with some minor exceptions thing which are not to be fed to dogs like chocolate whitebread.
5 people found this helpful
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Hi, My dog doesn't eat anything, he just love eating JERHIGH company sticks of differnet flavours. He is also suffering from thyroid, plus by licking his own front front legs, he has removed his hair from the front two legs.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
"Love jerhigh is what you trained them . Please restrict jerhigh as they are very tasty snacks . it should be limited to the level of snack .i.e feeding just one or two in the evening Regarding licking of foot and hair shedding is a sing of tick infestation Please consult you vet and also change the feeding habbit of jerhigh"
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Hello everyone, I have a 3 months old cat. Unfortunately I have to go to my place urgently, and I want to get her with me. My train journey takes 16 hours to reach. Can anyone suggest me some sleeping medicine for her which she can bear. Please give me name. India

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Cats are sensitive to sedatives so you cant but still you have calmimg tablets fron bheaphar company or scientific remedies as tablet form you can use it still efficacy depends on the own individual.
3 people found this helpful
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Hi doctors. My dog is 4 years labrador. There are some areas on his body where are few hairs left. With some redness. I am now using wokazole lotion. Please give some advice.

Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Hi doctors.
My dog is 4 years labrador. There are some areas on his body where are few hairs left. With some redness....
Wokazole is steroid combination it will subside the rashes for now but it can reappear. Next time get skin scraping done first.
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I have adopted a street dog and he is around 2.5 months old. He has a tendency to eat potty. I am giving 2.5ml of osteopet twice a day. Already 1 bottle is already finished. Please suggest.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
It could b pica, eating non food items, or worms in the stomach which do not allow to absorb nutrients n minerals no matter how good quality food you gave or it could be a behavioral issue what animals want to clean up all their body excreta in order to keep their territory clean. Might hv learnt from other street dogs b4 adoption. Il suggest you deworm the puppy first and see. In three days.
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How can the tumour growing in the Mammary gland of my dog be cured without operation?pls help, as she is 12 yrs old.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As she is 12 years of age, please dont do any surgery and try to maintain it with tablets and let it have happy life and favourite food.
1 person found this helpful
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My kitten paw is bleeding. I took him to the vet she cleaned it and gave him injection but still he is not fine he has started limping.

master of veterinary science
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Its quite natural that he is limping it will take time to heal and you will need a follow up with your vet.
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Ultrasonic anti rodent/rats machine, is it harmful for human ears or small below one month puppy ears, grateful if you can enlighten.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Frequency of the sound is too high for human to hear, but it is better you should consult with ent specialist.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
12 people found this helpful

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Your dog?s health is a key to a long and happy companionship. To keep it healthy in long run, it is important to know how your pet?s body work ? in health and disease! Being aware of certain basics helps you to prevent many problems, and pick up the major problems early in its course. In order to react quickly and help your pet?s ailments in timely manner you must be able to spot signs and relate them to specific systems, so as to understand gravity of it and seek Veterinarian?s advice sooner.
16 people found this helpful

Hello. My pet is almost 11 years old. It is a bitch. Of german Shepherd breed. She have not done any mating yet. Also she is dwarf. She weights almost 20-25 kg. Perhaps. I am thinking to get her cross once. So will it be ok for her to do mating at this age. As it would be her's first time.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Better you avoid. And of course for good reproductive health and safe living of your dog, you need to seek specialist opinion. You may go for few blood tests (can be advised as required) and an xray of abdomen to evaluate the clinical status of body & reproductive organ so that your vet can decide and discuss on it for future intervention with you. You may send those reports to me too. Thanks.
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

I am giving treatment for parvo virus for my dog what are the symptoms for decreasing of virus.

BVSc
Veterinarian, Noida
If upto 24 hours, there is no vomiting and loose motion (enteritis, it means it dog has recovered from parvo infection.
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My 2 month old puppy seems very dazed and disoriented after a week's treatment of Melonex 5mg. He's falling again and again in sleep. Really worried Kindly help

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please taken to vet and rule out parvo viral infection and start fluids immediately as puppy wont survive much as there body weight is very poor.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds


Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

10. Tosa Inu
Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

9. Pit Bulls
Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

8. Perro de Presa Canario
Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

7. Neapolitan Mastiff
Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

6. Fila Brasileiro
Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

5. Dogo Argentino
These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

3. Boerboel
Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

2. American Bulldog
American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

1. American Bandogge
These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
3 people found this helpful

Sir/mam, my dog (5 years old) is suffering with urine problem, i.e. He urinates but dropwise. He is otherwise active n takes meals properly There is no pain in stomach on pressing. Few days back he ate the whole small pack of pedigree and after that this happened. I gave him dexona n now giving norflox400. Pls help.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot
You give full of water as your dog want. It may be due to acidic urine so I advise routine urine test then consult the doctor.
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I am having 4 years old male dog. His hair is falling like bunch, bunch. Kindly suggest me any medication for him.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
If all of a sudden the problem started there may be some stress ongoing it may be due to seasonal changes also
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My female spitz aged 2yr limps frequently, as if she has pain in her hind legs. What could be the possible reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Check the paws and other inter digits for the foreign bodies and any history of ticks in the body for the past 4-5 months pls let me know
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