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Dr. J. D. Mukherji

Neurologist, Delhi

600 at clinic
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Dr. J. D. Mukherji Neurologist, Delhi
600 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. J. D. Mukherji
Dr. J. D. Mukherji is an experienced Neurologist in Dwarka, Delhi. You can visit him at Arcus Superspeciality Medicentre in Dwarka, Delhi. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. J. D. Mukherji on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Arcus Superspeciality Medicentre

# 205-209 ,2nd Floor,Vikas Surya Galaxy , Plot No- 9, Sector - 4,Dwarka. Landmark: Near to Ashirwadh Chowk, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
600 at clinic
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Arcus Superspeciality Medicentre

# 205-209 ,2nd Floor,Vikas Surya Galaxy , Plot No- 9, Sector - 4,Dwarka. Landmark: Near to Ashirwadh Chowk.Delhi Get Directions
600 at clinic
...more
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I am a 33 year old male and have parkinson disease for last 15 years. What should I do? i have visited so many doctors, but no fruitful result came till date.

M.D,Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Amritsar
Parkinson disease is older peoples. Tell me your symptoms. I doubt your diagnosis. Tell medicine you are taking.
2 people found this helpful
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What is parkinson's disease. Is it curable what the reasons responsible for the disease n what treatment do you suggest to eradicate it.

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Hyderabad
What is parkinson's disease. Is it curable what the reasons responsible for the disease n what treatment do you sugge...
Parkinson's disease is a disease of brain which occurs due to deficiency of chemical called dopamine in a region of brain called basal ganglia. It can present as shaking of hands and feet, difficulty or slowness in walking and stiffness/tightness of limbs. There is no obvious cause found for this disease. It can sometimes occur due to drugs taken for psychiatric illness but mostly there will be no cause found. There is treatment available to treat patients with Parkinson's disease but there is no cure and it cant be eradicated fully.
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Sir I am facing to insomnia I used a lot of medicines but no use pls solve my problem.

BAMS
Ayurveda, Ambala
Causes of lack of sleep: • stress • Anxiety • Depression • Pain • irregular schedule of sleep such as sleeping during day time & working during nights. • Excess intake of alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee) • Due to drugs, Due to high blood pressure. • Aging Due to lack of sleep there are many complications arise such as lack of concentration, irritability, fatigue. So these are some instructions & methods for good sleep: • Frequent oil massage of head with oil relax your mind and enhances sleep. You can also do foot massage daily it destress you. • Do not take stress. Do meditation and long breathing pranayams to relax the mind. • Do not take caffeine, tea & alcohol in excess and these are stimulant,(activate) your brain result in lack of sleep. • Avoid drinking alcohol & smoking. • Avoid sleep during day time as it makes it harder to fall asleep at night. •Try to sleep early at night. Do not think during sleep. Do exercise and long walk daily. • Avoid to take sleeping pills because these are habit forming drugs and these drugs disturb your normal sleep pattern. • Take a bowl of curd daily in afternoon and one glass of milk at night daily.
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Master Of Science ( Home Science) , B.Sc
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
World Autism Awareness Day 2015

World Autism Awareness Day aims to increase people's awareness about people, especially children, with autism. The day often features educational events for teachers, health care workers and parents, as well as exhibitions showcasing work created by children with autism.

Autism is a developmental disability that remains with a person for his or her whole life. This condition affects the brain's functions. The first signs usually appear before a child is three years old. People with autism often:

Find social interaction difficult.
Have problems with verbal and non-verbal communication.
Demonstrate restrictive and repetitive behavior.
Have a limited set of interests and activities.

Autism affects girls and boys of all races and in all geographic regions and has a large impact on children, their families, communities and societies
Caring for and educating children and young people with this condition places challenges on health care, education and training programs.
3 people found this helpful

Dear Sir! one more question I am asking In future days the epilepsy was coming for me or not? Doctor say that no problem me, ECG report was correctly .so I stop that medicine from last 6 months, But The thought will be continue since last 4 years because 4 times it attacked me ?By a chance it Will attack on future I am die or not?

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
Nobody knows for sure if it will come, since you have stopped be in peace, if it recurs we can start treatment again. Avoid high altitudes, swimming, working with dangerous machinery and preferably driving and near fire. All the best.
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My friends wife, age 60 is suffering from dementia. Can it be cured or checked by homeo treatment?

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Vadodara
Hi, yes there is complete curative treatment for this problem without any side effects, you can contact me personally so that we can start with detailed case taking.
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Is there no medicine which can treat nerves. As all medicine try to suppress pain signal sending to brain.

MBBS
General Physician, Jalgaon
Is there no medicine which can treat nerves. As all medicine try to suppress pain signal sending to brain.
Please Take Saraswatarishta 20 ml Twice a day Badam pak by Patanjali 2 tsf two times a day Put some cow ghee drops in both nostrils regularly These points will help you to improve brain signals.
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Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

3 people found this helpful

I'm suffering from migraine attacks from the past week. I have at 2 times a day. My sleep routine is disrupted. Could you please help me? And prescribe something which will get my sleep routine bacm in track.

MBBS DA FIPM
Pain Management Specialist, Jabalpur
Take breakfast daily. Do not watch TV for more then 1 hour per day regular exercise brisk walk, jogging,cycling for 45 minutes avoid eating chocolates fix your time of sleep you should have minimum 8 hours sleep in the night there are inhalers available in market .whenever you feel you can take those .regular medical check up.
2 people found this helpful
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