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Dr. Gurmukh Singh

Psychiatrist, Delhi

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Dr. Gurmukh Singh Psychiatrist, Delhi
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Dr. Gurmukh Singh is a trusted Psychiatrist in Narela, Delhi. He is currently associated with De Addiction Centre in Narela, Delhi. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Gurmukh Singh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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De Addiction Centre

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I am always confused about take any decision and I mostly think about other people I cannot take my own decision I am mostly stress and thinking anything what is this suggest me am I wrong or right.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
I am always confused about take any decision and I mostly think about other people I cannot take my own decision I am...
You have obsession and anxiety. I give you stress control tips. Try them and also do yoga and meditation.
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How to stop smoking please let me quit smoking by giving some tips I have a strong desire.

BHMS
Homeopath, Murshidabad
Dear lybrate user, you may need a bit of willpower to stop smoking permanently. You could easily abstain yourself from smoking during the initial 2-3 days. But after few days of abstaining from smoking you will feel a strong craving to smoke a cigarette whenever you face any tense situation. Here lies your real test. You will need a lot of willpower to resist that craving & face any tense situation without the help of nicotine. However, you can take homoeopathic mother tincture daphne indica q, 30 drops, thrice daily, after meals, in a cup of water. This medicine will help to reduce your craving for nicotine. To minimise the bad-effects of smoking take one single bulb garlic everyday at morning before brushing your teeth.
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I am suffering from agoraphobia panic attack anxiety last 2 year I taking regularly allopathic medicine but not improve.

Hypnotherapist, DCS, BSIC, Advanced Trainee of Transactional Analysis, Advanced Skills in Counselling
Psychologist,
I am suffering from agoraphobia panic attack anxiety last 2 year I taking regularly allopathic medicine but not improve.
Allopathy medicines will only do symptomatic relief work but not re obe the cause of the illness. Panic and anxiety occurs when people feel unsafe and threatened in social situations thus refusing to socialise. Counselling can help you by slowly empowering you to integrate back I to the society as this is a basic need for humans. The counsellor will help you to work through the outdated thoughts and beliefs which create the panic attack and replace them with more helpful and updated thoughts and beliefs which will make you feel in control ant confident from within. A swot analysis will help you to discover your own personal strengths and limitations which you can use and sharpen to feel and behave more confidently. 2. Having a realistic picture of yourself and of people around you will help you calm down as well. 3. Doing deep breathing exercises and pranayams are very helpful for people with anxiety and panic. It will help you to remain calm and assess the situation more realistically. 4. Gradual exposure to the thratening situation under the guidance of the counsellor will help you to reduce anxiety and stress. 5. Exercise exercise exercise. This is most important for you to feel confident and good aboit yourself. Initially you can choose a lonely place but gradually you will need to exercise with fellow human beings because we can't thrive in isolation and can die of loneliness. 6. Healthy die which is low on sugars and processed foods is a must. High sugar, fats and processed foods are linked to anxiety and panic attacks as it elevates the blood sugar causing irritability and anxiety.
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I have a problem is, I'm getting more angry easily, suppose what I'm saying if they are not following meas its disappointing more to me. I want to handle this situation frequently. Any possibility is there for cure this problem.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
ANGER: There is a saying "Frustration begets anger and anger begets aggression." Direct anger, is expressed toward the object perceived as the cause of the frustration. If a machine does not work, you might hit it or kick it. If someone gets in your way, you could verbally threaten them or push them aside. If the source of the frustration is too powerful or threatening for direct aggression, displaced aggression is often used. The aggression is redirected toward a less threatening and more available object. An angry person often acts without thinking. The person has given in to the frustration and they have given up restraint. Anger can be a healthy response if it motivates us to positive action but all too often the actions we engage in when angry are destructive. Indeed, if we could see a videotape of ourselves getting angry, the humiliation might well help cure us of anger. When you feel frustration building, you have to practice learned responses that lead to healthy actions instead of destructive ones. GIVING UP: Giving up on a goal can be productive if the goal is truly out of reach. However, more often giving up (quitting or being apathetic) is another form of giving in to frustration. When repeatedly frustrated, people can drop out of school, quit jobs, or move away. Apathy is giving up all of your goals, so you cannot be frustrated by trying to reach them. We live in difficult time and we have to be persistent in order to accomplish. Consider how many projects you began, and then gave up, because you became frustrated and lost patience. Make a list of things you started and quit because they seemed too difficult. Now calculate the disappointment and loss you suffered by not dealing with the frustration in a more healthy way. Try to remember that quitters never win, and winners never quit. Losing your temper means you're a quitter. LOSS OF CONFIDENCE: is a terrible frequent side effect of giving up and not fulfilling your goal. A loss of self-confidence and self-esteem, means that If we quit once, then the next time we plan a goal, we may not be able to accurately assess our ability to carry it out and we stop trusting ourselves and our own abilities. This became a self-fulfilling and self-destructive attitude. You need to be able to learn that when the going gets tough, you say to yourself "It is worth it!" and by following through, it not only gets the job done, but it builds self-confidence. STRESS: is the "wear and tear" our body and mind experiences as we adjust to the frustrations our continually changing environment. Too frequently, extreme, or prolonged frustration and stress strains us and generates distress signals. Our body experiences distress signals in a variety of ways, often in the form of: irritability, anger, fatigue anxiety, headache, depression, stomach aches, hypertension, migraines, ulcers, heart attacks, or colitis. DEPRESSION: Depression can affect almost every aspect of your life. It affects people of all ages, income, race, and cultures. Depression can affect the way you eat and sleep the way you feel about yourself, the way one think about things, and the way you interact with others. While we all feel depression at various appropriate times in our lives, excess or inappropriate depression cannot be easily dismissed or wished away. OTHER REACTIONS: abuse of drugs & alcohol is self-destructive and usually futile attempt at dealing with frustration, as are many eating and weight problems and addictions Whenever the immediate effects of the addictive behaviour wear off, users find themselves back in the same, or even worse, frustrating situation. Anger is among the gamut of emotions we exhibit as a reaction to a situation, and it is a 'normal' emotion too as long as it is kept under control. Some people have the propensity to explode when pushed to the extreme. They keep swallowing their emotions until they can finally do it no more, and erupt like a volcano. Others dealing with extreme anger are like a ticking time bomb. You'll never know what you unwittingly say or do can trigger an explosion. In either case, anger that cannot be controlled comes with a physical reaction. Your heart beats faster preparing you for both action and reaction. Your breathing quickens. You may clench your fist, tighten your shoulders and go into a defensive position. The problem arises out of the fact that it is almost impossible to feel anger and empathy at the same time. An angry person is seldom sensitive to the wellbeing of his victim, and hence may lash out verbally and sometimes physically. Such things done in the heat of the moment mostly leaves us with regrets. So here are a few ways to deal with extreme anger. 1. Approve it / Acknowledge it: The first step in solving a problem is recognizing that you have one. The fundamental problem here is that people believe they are on the right track and refuse to budge from their views. It is essential to realize that this step is not about deciding whether you are right or wrong, but acknowledging the fact that your reaction to the situation can be channelled in a better way. When getting someone to acknowledge their anger problem, be careful as to not use negative words like wrong, false and shouldn't. Instead, influence with positive words like can and should. Instead of saying 'You are wrong to react like this', you can say, 'I understand what you are feeling. Is there a way we can resolve this situation?' 2. Understand / recognize the signs: Once you know that your problems exist, you can try devising ways that will work for you in dealing with the situation. You can count to 100 to calm yourself or simply decide to not speak until you can calm yourself. Knowing that you may enter into an argument in a situation, you can list down the points that you feel strongly about and discuss each of them one by one. Working your way through a finite list gives a better opportunity to reach closure at the end. 3. Free the mind/Find ways to let it go: Not all arguments end in closure. A lot of unsaid justifications cloud our mind repeatedly leaving us seething from the inside. Research has shown that the normal or neurological anger response lasts less than two seconds. Beyond that it takes a strong will to stay angry. Once you realize how much your anger is consuming your mind, decide to free your mind with meditation and other calming exercises. Tell yourself that some people and issues simply don't deserve your anger, emotion, reaction or time.
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Exercising Your Brain - Ways To Improve Your Mental Health!

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Delhi
Exercising Your Brain - Ways To Improve Your Mental Health!

Brain is just like other muscles in the body; stimulation of the brain cells on a continuous basis will lead to a well-functioning brain. In fact, exercising your brain through various brain exercises helps in forming new neural pathways inside it. Neuroplasticity is the ability of the brain to change and adapt when it is stimulated.

The various methods you can adopt to improve your mental health are:

  1. Learn a musical instrument: Start taking music classes to learn an instrument such as guitar or piano as it helps in improving mental health. It also helps in delaying age related problems such as Alzheimer's disease.
  2. Do math exercises in your head: Try figuring out various mathematical sums inside your head, as this will keep your brain sharp. It has also been known to improve intelligence quotient.
  3. Try to Recall Past Events: When you try to recall past events, the section of the brain dealing with memory is stimulated and thus, leads to stronger neural connections.
  4. Learning a New Language: Learning a new language is good for the brain as well because it helps in delaying the process of decline of cognitive functions. Chances of being affected by mental health disorders decrease significantly.
  5. Aerobic Exercises: You should follow a regular exercise regimen consisting of aerobic exercises and cardiovascular exercises as they help in improving your blood circulation. Apart from keeping you fitter and lean, it also improves your overall wellbeing.
  6. Improve your Hand-eye Coordination: Do activities such as painting, knitting or solving puzzles as they help in improving your hand eye coordination. It fine tunes your motor skills and keeps you mentally sharp.
  7. Cooking: Learning to cook can help in activating various parts of the brain such as sight, smell and taste. This is related to different parts of the brain resulting in an overall development.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3658 people found this helpful

Hi am 24 unmarried male. My problem is that when I think of sex, watch any intimate scene, or someone talk anything sexual near me. I get nervous and anxious. My heart beat increases very fast. I can't control my erections and ejaculate immediately. Suffering from this issues from 5 years. What is the cause of the problem. anxiety, premature ejaculation or erectile dysfunction. please guide I am highly depressed because of this. Taking Homeopathic treatment from 4 month, only night falls issue has been resolved. But all this issues haven't. please help me to get rid of the problem. Want permanent treatment.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Ahmedabad
Hi am 24 unmarried male.
My problem is that when I think of sex, watch any intimate scene, or someone talk anything s...
Hello Lybrate user 1. Avoid those condition which makes you excited and also its normal thing as to get erection, discharge etc. 2. Do not need to have nervousness. 3. Make yourself relax and concentrate in your career. 4. Regular morning walk, exercise, yoga and pranayam will give you good stamina and away from depression and anxiety, 5. You can take help with such Ayurveda remedies as A. Mentat tab 2 tabs twice a day B Saraswatarishtam 10 ml twice a day C. Medhya Rasayan tab 2 tabs twice a day,
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My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms like reduced motivation, speech and activity are occurred. Now he is on medications for that. He is on tab quiet 25 mg (Quetiapine Fumarate INN 28.728 mg equivalent to 25 mg of Quetiapine) once daily. 1 hour after taking this medicine he gets calm and sleeps. Even if he wakes up in the middle of the night, he was not in his senses at that time. Most of the time he urinates while he is asleep. Even he forgets to go to washroom and he poops in his pants but he forgets to wash himself. His condition is not improving. Kindly please suggest suitable medication which can cure above said things of his health.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, del...
Hi there ~ Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead Improving Emotional Health Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one. Preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care As you come to grips with an Alzheimer’s or other dementia diagnosis, you may be dealing with a whole range of emotions and concerns. You’ll no doubt be worried about how your loved one will change, how you’ll keep him or her comfortable, and how much your life will change. You’ll also likely be experiencing emotions such as anger, grief, and shock. Adjusting to this new reality is not easy. It’s important to give yourself some time and to reach out for help. The more support you have, the better you will be able to help your loved one. While some of these tips are directed specifically at Alzheimer’s patients, they may equally apply to those with other types of dementia as well, including vascular and mixed dementia. Early-stage Alzheimer’s care preparations There are some Alzheimer’s care preparations that are best done sooner rather than later. It may be hard to consider these questions at first, as it means thinking about a time when your loved one is already well down the road of his or her Alzheimer’s journey. However, putting preparations in place early helps a smoother transition for everyone. Depending on the stage of diagnosis, include the person with Alzheimer’s in the decision-making process as much as possible. If their dementia is at a more advanced stage, at least try to act on what their wishes would be. Questions to consider in preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care: Who will make healthcare and/or financial decisions when the person is no longer able to do so? While a difficult topic to bring up, if your loved one is still lucid enough, getting their wishes down on paper means they’ll be preserved and respected by all members of the family. Consider meeting with an elder law attorney to best understand your options. You’ll want to consider power of attorney, both for finances and for healthcare. If the person has already lost capacity, you may need to apply for guardianship/conservatorship. More information can be found in the Resources section below. How will care needs be met? Sometimes family members assume that a spouse or nearest family member can take on caregiving, but that is not always the case. Caregiving is a large commitment that gets bigger over time. The person with Alzheimer’s will eventually need round-the-clock care. Family members may have their own health issues, jobs, and responsibilities. Communication is essential to make sure that the needs of the Alzheimer’s patient are met, and that the caregiver has the support to meet those needs. Where will the person live? Is his or her own home appropriate, or is it difficult to access or make safe for later? If the person is currently living alone, for example, or far from any family or other support, it may be necessary to relocate or consider a facility with more support. Find out what assistance your medical team can provide in these areas. In some countries, you can also hire a care manager privately. Geriatric care managers can provide an initial assessment as well as assistance with managing your case, including crisis management, interviewing in-home help, or assisting with placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Developing day-to-day routines Having a general daily routine in Alzheimer’s and dementia care helps caregiving run smoothly. These routines won’t be set in stone, but they give a sense of consistency, which is beneficial to the Alzheimer’s patient even if they can’t communicate it. While every family will have their own unique routine, you can get some great ideas from your medical team or Alzheimer’s support group, especially regarding establishing routines to handle the most challenging times of day, such as evenings. Keep a sense of structure and familiarity. Try to keep consistent daily times for activities such as waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, receiving visitors, and bedtime. Keeping these things at the same time and place can help orientate the person. Let the person know what to expect even if you are not sure that he or she completely understands. You can use cues to establish the different times of day. For example, in the morning you can open the curtains to let sunlight in. In the evening, you can put on quiet music to indicate it’s bedtime. Involve the person in daily activities as much as they are able. For example, a person may not be able to tie their shoes, but may be able to put clothes in the hamper. Clipping plants outside may not be safe, but the person may be able to weed, plant, or water. Use your best judgment as to what is safe and what the person can handle. Communication tips As your loved one’s Alzheimer’s progresses, you will notice changes in communication. Trouble finding words, increased hand gestures, easy confusion, even inappropriate outbursts are all normal. Here are some do’s and don’ts on communicating: Communication Do's and Don'ts? Do Avoid becoming frustrated by empathizing and remembering the person can’t help their condition. Making the person feel safe rather than stressed will make communication easier. Take a short break if you feel your fuse getting short. Keep communication short, simple, and clear. Give one direction or ask one question at a time. Tell the person who you are if there appears to be any doubt. Call the person by name. Speak slowly. The person may take longer to process what’s being said. Use closed-ended questions which can be answered “yes” or “no.” For example, ask, “Did you enjoy the beef at dinner?” instead of “What did you have for dinner?” Find a different way to say the same thing if it wasn’t understood. Try a simpler statement with fewer words. Use distraction or fibs if telling the whole truth will upset the person with dementia. For example, to answer the question, “Where is my mother?” it may be better to say, “She’s not here right now” instead of “She died 20 years ago.” Use repetition as much as necessary. Be prepared to say the same things over and over as the person can’t recall them for more than a few minutes at a time. Use techniques to attract and maintain the person’s attention. Smile, make eye contact, use gestures, touch, and other body language. Don't Ever say things like: “Do you remember?” “Try to remember!” “Did you forget?” “How could you not know that? Ask questions that challenge short-term memory such as “Do you remember what we did last night?” The answer will likely be “no,” which may be humiliating for the person with dementia. Talk in paragraphs. Instead, offer one idea at a time. Point out the person’s memory difficulty. Avoid remarks such as “I just told you that.” Instead, just repeat it over and over. Talk in front of the person as if he or she were not present. Always include the person in any conversation when they are physically present. Use lots of pronouns such as "there, that, those, him, her, it. Use nouns instead. For example, instead of "sit there" say "sit in the blue chair. Use slang or unfamiliar words. The person may not understand the latest terms or phrases. Use patronizing language or “baby talk.” A person with dementia will feel angry or hurt at being talked down to. Use sarcasm or irony, even if meant humorously. Again, it can cause hurt or confusion. Planning activities and visitors As you develop daily routines, it’s important to include activities and visitors. You want to make sure that the Alzheimer’s patient is getting sensory experiences and socialization, but not to the point of getting overstimulated and stressed. Here are some suggestions for activities: Start with the person’s interests. Ask family and friends for memories of interests the person used to have. You’ll want to tailor the interests to the current level of ability so the person doesn’t get frustrated. Vary activities to stimulate different senses of sight, smell, hearing, and touch. For example, you can try singing songs, telling stories, movement such as dance, walking, or swimming, tactile activities such as painting, working with clay, gardening, or interacting with pets. Planning time outdoors can be very therapeutic. You can go for a drive, visit a park, or take a short walk. Even sitting on a balcony or in the backyard can be relaxing. Consider outside group activities designed for those with Alzheimer’s. Senior centers or community centers may host these types of activities. You can also look into adult day care programs, which are partial or full days at a facility catering to older adults and/or dementia patients. Visitors and social events Visitors can be a rich part of the day for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It can also provide an opportunity for you as the caregiver to socialize or take a break. Plan visitors at a time of day when your loved one can best handle them. Brief visitors on communication tips if they are uncertain and suggest they bring memorabilia your loved one may like, such as a favorite old song or book. Family and social events may also be appropriate, as long as the Alzheimer’s patient is comfortable. Focus on events that won’t overwhelm the person; excessive activity or stimulation at the wrong time of day might be too much to handle. Handling challenges in Alzheimer's and dementia care One of the most painful parts of Alzheimer’s disease is watching a loved one display behavior you never would have thought possible. Alzheimer’s can cause substantial changes in how someone acts. This can range from the embarrassing, such as inappropriate outbursts, to wandering, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Everyday tasks like eating, bathing, and dressing can become major challenges. Painful as some behaviors are, it’s critical not to blame yourself or try to handle all the changes in behavior alone. As challenging behavior progresses, you may find yourself too embarrassed to go out, for example, or to seek respite care. Unfortunately, difficult behavior is part and parcel of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t isolate yourself. Ask for help from the medical team and reach out to caregiver groups for support. There are ways to modify or better accommodate problem behaviors. Both the environment you create at home and the way you communicate with your loved one can make a substantial difference. Considering long-term Alzheimer's and dementia care It’s the nature of Alzheimer’s disease to progressively get worse as memory deteriorates. In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one will likely need round-the-clock care. Thinking ahead to these possibilities can help make decisions easier. To find links to organizations in your area that may be able to help, see Resources and References below. Care at home There are several options for extending care at home: In-home help refers to caregivers that you can hire to provide assistance for your loved one. In-home help ranges from a few hours a week of assistance to live-in help, depending on your needs. You’ll want to evaluate what sort of tasks you’d like help with, how much you can afford to spend, and what hours you need. Getting help with basic tasks like housekeeping, shopping, or other errands can also help you provide more focused care for your loved one. Day programs, also called adult day care, are programs that typically operate weekdays and offer a variety of activities and socialization opportunities. They also provide the chance for you as the caregiver to continue working or attend to other needs. There are some programs that specialize in dementia care. Respite care. Respite care is short-term care where your loved one stays in a facility temporarily. This gives you a block of time to rest, travel, or attend to other things. Is it time to move? As Alzheimer’s progresses, the physical and mental demands on you as caregiver can gradually become overwhelming. Each day can bring more challenges. The patient may require total assistance with physical tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as greater overall supervision. At some point, you won’t be able to leave your loved one alone. Nighttime behaviors may not allow you to sleep, and with some patients, belligerent or aggressive behaviors may exceed your ability to cope or feel safe. Every situation is different. Sometimes the gap can be bridged by bringing in additional assistance, such as in-home help or other family members to share the caregiving burden. However, it is not a sign of weakness if moving to your loved one to a facility seems like the best plan of care. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you’re overwhelmed by stress and fatigue, it’s difficult to maintain your caregiving standards. If the person with Alzheimer’s is living alone, or you as the primary caregiver have health problems, this option may need to be considered sooner rather than later. When considering your caregiving options, it’s important to consider whether you are able to balance your other obligations, either financial or to other family members. Will you be able to afford appropriate in-home coverage if you can’t continue caregiving? Talk to your loved one’s medical care team for their perspective as well. Evaluating an assisted living facility or nursing home If the best choice is to move the Alzheimer’s patient to a facility, it doesn’t mean you will no longer be involved in their care. You can still visit regularly and ensure your loved one gets the care he or she needs. Even if you are not yet ready to make that step, doing some initial legwork might save a lot of heartache in the case of a crisis where you have to move quickly. The first step is finding the right place for your loved one. Choosing a facility There are two main types of facilities that you will most likely have to evaluate for a loved one with Alzheimer’s: an assisted living facility or a nursing home. Assisted Living Assisted living is an option for those who need help with some activities of daily living. Some facilities provide minor help with medications as well. Staff is available twenty-four hours a day, but you will want to make sure they have experience handling residents with Alzheimer’s disease. Also be clear about what stage your loved may need to move to a higher level of care. Nursing homes Nursing homes provide assistance in both activities of daily living and a high level of medical care. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is almost always on the premises. Skilled nursing care providers and medical professionals such as occupational or physical therapists are also available. How do I choose a facility? Once you’ve determined the appropriate level of care, you’ll want to visit the facility—both announced and unannounced—to meet with the staff and otherwise evaluate the home. You will also want to evaluate the facility based on their experience with Alzheimer’s residents. Facilities that cater specifically for Alzheimer’s patients should have a designated area, often called a special care unit in the U.S. For residents with dementia. Questions to ask such a facility include: Policy and procedures – Does the unit mix Alzheimer’s patients with those with mental illness, which can be dangerous? Does the program require the family to supply a detailed social history of the resident (a good sign)? Environment – Is the unit clean? Is the dining area large enough for all residents to use it comfortably? Are the doors alarmed or on a delayed opening system to prevent wandering? Is the unit too noisy? Staffing – What is the ratio of residents to staff? (5 to 1 during the day, 9 to 1 at night is normal). What is staff turnover like? How do they handle meals and ensure adequate hydration, since the person can often forget to eat or drink? How do they assess unexpressed pain—if the Alzheimer’s resident has pain but cannot communicate it? Staff training – What training for Alzheimer’s care do they have? Does the facility provide staff with monthly in-service training on Alzheimer’s care? Activities – Is there an activity plan for each resident based on the person’s interests and remaining cognitive strengths? Are residents escorted outside on a daily basis? Are regular outings planned for residents? Services – Does the unit provide hospice services? What were the findings in the most recent state survey? What to expect during a transition Moving is a big adjustment both for the person with Alzheimer’s and you as their caregiver. Your loved one is moving to a new home with new faces. You are adjusting from being the person providing hands-on care to being an advocate. Remember to give yourself and the Alzheimer’s patient time to adjust. If you’re expecting to move, try to have essentials packed and ready to go, and as many administrative details taken care of as possible, as sometimes beds can come up quickly. Work closely with staff regarding your loved one’s needs and preferences. An extra familiar face during moving day, such as another relative or close friend, can also help. Each person adjusts differently to this transition. Depending on your loved one’s needs, you may either need to visit more frequently or give your loved one their own space to adjust. As the adjustment period eases, you can settle into the visiting pattern that is best for both of you. I hope this helps.
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