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Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani  - Veterinarian, Delhi

Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani

PHD Pathology, MVSE

Veterinarian, Delhi

55 Years Experience
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Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani PHD Pathology, MVSE Veterinarian, Delhi
55 Years Experience
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Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani
Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani is a popular Veterinarian in Pandav Nagar, Delhi. He has over 55 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He has done PHD Pathology, MVSE . He is currently associated with Dayals Path Lab Cum Pet Clinic in Pandav Nagar, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Dayals Kumar Balani and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
PHD Pathology - Agra University, Mathura - 1963
MVSE - Baraily University - 1967
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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Dayals Path Lab Cum Pet Clinic

Shop Number - 40Nehru Complex Upper Ground Floor Opposite Mother Dairy Plant Near Hero Honda Showroom Pandav Nagar Delhi - 110092Delhi Get Directions
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Tips To Help You Care For Your Horse!

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Tips To Help You Care For Your Horse!

Caring for your horse can make this strong animal healthier and interactive and a long-lived companion for you. Horses are quite hardy and amazing animals but they require good care for sustainable health and prevention of diseases. Horse owners, particularly those who are inexperienced are often unaware of what they should do to care for their horse and with these few tips, the task of caring for your horse would not be quite difficult.

  1. Take your horse to the grooming area: When you have a horse, you must also have a distinct space outside the regular stall where you groom your pet. You must tie it up so that it cannot wander about when you are trying to groom it. Grooming the horse can be a messy job and thus, you should wear old and rugged clothes.
  2. Cleaning the dust off the horse’s coat: A rubber curry brush would help you to loosen up the dirt seated on the coat. You will have to move the brush in a circular motion over its body except for the face and legs since there is a chance of hurting the sensitive skin on these areas. A dandy brush would aid in removing the dirt from the surface of the coat and you should move the brush in short strokes so that the dirt falls off its coat. It is important to ensure that you are clearing the dirt in a flicking motion as it would otherwise cause irritation and itchiness on the horse’s skin.
  3. Use electric clippers for trimming the hair: If there are areas which need to get trimmed, you should invest in a good quality electric clipper for trimming off the hair and make your horse’s coat appear more neat and polished. You can also use a mane comb for untangling the tail and mane of your horse but you should be gentle and careful while using your fingers so that no hair is broken or pulled out.
  4. Bathe your companion as required: If you think that your pet horse is too dirty, you should give it a bath. It can start with showering down the whole body with lukewarm water for clearing off all the dirt in the coat and prepare it for shampooing. You can look for shampoo specifically designed for the horse and massage the coat with the help of a curry brush and then rinse off thoroughly. After rinsing off the shampoo, you should apply conditioner, leave it for a few minutes and wash off.

A good quality hay devoid of insects, mites and dust and plenty of water is essential for your horse to survive and be fit and active. Also, small amounts of grains all through the day, particularly during the cooler hours would also contribute to its health.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3390 people found this helpful

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

DogAware.com.
4 people found this helpful

We have adopted a Persian cat she is 5 months old she is getting some infection kind a things on her right ear corner and on her back please suggest.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, you should deworm your dog every month upto 6m and later every 3 months. Clean the ear with ambiflush ear drops every 10 days/ after bathing. Follow manufacture instructions.
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B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Saharanpur
Parasites don't want to kill your kitten or puppy; they just want to use them as a dinner plate! Our goal is to prevent that from happening. Intestinal parasites have been around forever and are not going away, but you can control them with the proper deworming schedule! Hookworms and roundworms are by far the most common intestinal worms found in puppies and kittens. Roundworms compete with your pet for food and hookworms live on blood causing anemia.
Rough hair coats, diarrhea, malnutrition progressing to intestinal obstruction, and anemia are common issues with worms! We want to feed our pets - not the parasites. That is why we deworm. Don't wait until you are sure your pet has parasites – they have already caused damage at this point.
so always remember about deworming of your loving pet.
4 people found this helpful

I have a kingfisher bird n I notice hs feather is falling any medication pls suggest.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
You can give multivitamin drops, kindly notice that the bird is pecking itself in aggressive manner, if so it may be due to nite infection also.
1 person found this helpful
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Lumps Or Bumps Growth on Dogs - Why Visiting A Doctor Is Recommended?

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Lumps Or Bumps Growth on Dogs - Why Visiting A Doctor Is Recommended?

It is not unnatural to find some lumps or bumps on your dog’s body, particularly when the dog is approaching its senior years. These growths are among the most common issues found in older dogs. But it can also happen to the younger ones. It is natural to be scared and have doubts whether it is a tumor or a lump or is it cancer. As a dog owner, therefore, you must understand the different types of lumps, bumps and growths on the dogs so that you can consult with a reputed veterinarian without delay.

1. Understanding the lumps, bumps, and growths: The veterinary doctor would refer to an unknown lump as a tumor in a general manner. This term do not indicate the malignity or benignity of the tumor. These terms typically indicate that an abnormal growth of tissues has taken place inside the body which has a shape or is a mass. There is no reason to panic in case your vet says that there is a growth or something of similar significance.

2. Getting the right diagnosis of the lumps on dogs: The dog owners are most likely to notice growth on the dogs while taking it for routine grooming or while petting it. When there is a new growth or tumor on the dog, it is safer to consult with the veterinarian who can carry out a thorough checkup. He would discuss the medical history of the dog which may include daily lifestyle, diet, signs and symptoms of illness and then a physical examination will be performed. It is important to note here that sometimes, the growth may not be noticeable and this is the primary reason why taking it out to an experienced veterinarian is crucial. The expert would be able to find visible masses while carrying out a routine examination.

3. Testing the mass or lump on the dog’s body: When there is a lump or growth on the dog’s body, it is important to carry out some tests such as complete blood count, urinalysis, radiographs revealing signs of metastasis and internal abnormalities, ultrasound, CT scan and certain advanced diagnostics.

In some cases when the lump can be easily accessed, the expert may recommend you to take your dog for a fine needle aspirate which is performed by inserting a small needle into the mass and drawing back the syringe. A little amount of tissue gets accumulated in the syringe which is then tested to determine the character of the lump. When the fine needle aspirate test is not effective, usually a biopsy is carried out under general anesthesia or mild sedation where it is cut out surgically or the entire mass is removed following surgical procedures.

3266 people found this helpful

I have a 4 month old sable German Shepherd single coat bitch. As she is growing .she is getting slimmer. What should I gave her to make her healthy?

M.D. Consultant Pathologist, CCEBDM Diabetes, PGDS Sexology USA, CCMTD Thyroid, ACDMC Heart Disease, CCMH Hypertension, ECG
Sexologist, Sri Ganganagar
You have probably heard that you want to feed your GSD a low-fat, high-protein diet. And this is correct, when your dog is at their ideal weight. A high-protein, low-fat diet is perfect for helping your dog maintain his weight, giving him the nutrient he needs to be energized and build muscle. When your German shepherd is underweight, however, adding more fat to his diet is a good idea. This will provide his body with the calories it needs to start to put on weight. This does not mean that you should just be feeding him the fattiest kibble that you can find. You still want plenty of protein in that diet, but you do not want to be feeding him just protein. If you do not want to change kibbles, you might try adding some animal fat to the food that he is already eatng. His will do two things: first, it will up the calorie count of that food, giving him the ability to gain weight; second, it will probably make the food you are feeding him a little more enticing. If your dog is underweight because he simply is not interested in eating, putting some animal fat on his kibble could help to rectify this problem.
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Hi, My Lab is 8 years old. And now she has started to Limp on her right leg. I dont know if she is in pain. What should i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Start adult senior diet available in the market for him and give him pet joint capsules each one daily until symptoms subsidise
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My parrot ate tomatoes and then his activity reduced and then he is continuously crying and is swollen up from front part baby is not even 20 days please help fast.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My parrot ate tomatoes and then his activity reduced and then he is continuously crying and is swollen up from front ...
It might have blocked in crop region. Try to massage so that it is relived from pain or take it to a vet.
1 person found this helpful
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