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Dr. Charit Jyoti Boruah

B.V.Sc & A.H

Veterinarian, Delhi

20 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
Dr. Charit Jyoti Boruah B.V.Sc & A.H Veterinarian, Delhi
20 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Charit Jyoti Boruah
Dr. Charit Jyoti Boruah is a popular Veterinarian in Patel Nagar, Delhi. He has been a practicing Veterinarian for 20 years. He studied and completed B.V.Sc & A.H . He is currently associated with Patel Nagar Pet Clinic in Patel Nagar, Delhi. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Charit Jyoti Boruah on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Veterinarians from across India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Specialty
Education
B.V.Sc & A.H - Lakhimpuri College of Veterinary Science, - 1997
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
Delhi Veterinary Council

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B 2 B / 300, Janak Puri. Landmark: Near Metro Pillar 540, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
100 at clinic
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#M-27, Ground Floor, West Patel Nagar. Landmark: Metro Pillar No.230 & Near Shadiipur Metro Station & Near Upchaar Medicos, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Hey please any doctor help me my dog has eaten a frog and he is vomiting. please suggests me any fast treatment.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Dog is carnivores, it eats many kinds of animals, if given to it, but generally, it kills & does not eat. Vomition is an act of getting out the frog from stomach, it is good thing, I have not encountered such situations as like you, in my opinion, it may digest the frog, by its digestive juices, or more prompt, the frog should be removed by laparotomy means by surgical operation, it is done well. Frogs have obnoxious glands on its skin, due to which there will be vomiting,
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I have Saint Bernard, he is not eating since last 6 months properly & goes slim & slim I have tried every thing Please help me Please I beg u

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Deworm properly , give him good exercise .And have good diet preferably dogs food with lot of nonveg . as they are heavy breeders.
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I found a injured pigeon I bring it to home he is nt eating anything only drinking water and milk I think he got a electric shock.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You continue giving water and milk. For external injury you can get him check with local vet. You can use enrox for prevention of infection
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Hi, Doctor I am having a 50 days old female dachshund. It use to make some kind of sound through out the night ? Is there any reason fr it ? & is there any special care I have to GV to my puppy in this age.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be worm load in his stomach, can cause same type of problem . and also please consult a vet near by as its very young age on table prescription will have danger
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Hi I have a pair of guinea pigs one male and another female so female's upper tooth are broken and she not eating any type and now near condition is very serious so please help me doctor

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Through out life guniea pig" s teeths are continuously growing. So if they are broken it is better you should hand fed your guniea pig till they are fully grown back to normal. If there is infection then you should consult vet.
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I had got a fallen squirrel baby so what should I feed him and how to keep him warm ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use a carton box with 60 watts buld ata distance of 1.5 feet above the baby so that the box get heated and in frequent interval switch off and on it and feed him with cerlac in semi diluted state with syringe.
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Sir my dashound dog is 7 years old, eating well no toilet and urine problems, but its upper abdominal part is paining severely. Cannot touch at all. Walking slowly only. Always sleeping difficult to get up in back area. What is the problem and remedy. Kindly advise.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear treat like following manner treat with noroxin tablet (one tablet in morning/evening) and tablet metacin 500mg one tablet morning/evening.
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BVSc
Veterinarian,
Foods which are poisonous to dogs.

Most dogs love food, and they?re especially attracted to what they see us eating. While sharing the occasional tidbit with your dog is fine, it?s important to be aware that some foods can be very dangerous to dogs. Take caution to make sure your dog never gets access to the foods below. Even if you don?t give him table scraps, your dog might eat something that?s hazardous to his health if he raids kitchen counters, cupboards and trash cans. For advice on teaching your dog not to steal food, please see our article, Counter Surfing and Garbage Raiding.
Avocado

Avocado leaves, fruit, seeds and bark may contain a toxic principle known as persin. The Guatemalan variety, a common one found in stores, appears to be the most problematic. Other varieties of avocado can have different degrees of toxic potential.
Birds, rabbits, and some large animals, including horses, are especially sensitive to avocados, as they can have respiratory distress, congestion, fluid accumulation around the heart, and even death from consuming avocado. While avocado is toxic to some animals, in dogs and cats, we do not expect to see serious signs of illness. In some dogs and cats, mild stomach upset may occur if the animal eats a significant amount of avocado flesh or peel. Ingestion of the pit can lead to obstruction in the gastrointestinal tract, which is a serious situation requiring urgent veterinary care.
Avocado is sometimes included in pet foods for nutritional benefit. We would generally not expect avocado meal or oil present in commercial pet foods to pose a hazard to dogs and cats.
Bread Dough

Raw bread dough made with live yeast can be hazardous if ingested by dogs. When raw dough is swallowed, the warm, moist environment of the stomach provides an ideal environment for the yeast to multiply, resulting in an expanding mass of dough in the stomach. Expansion of the stomach may be severe enough to decrease blood flow to the stomach wall, resulting in the death of tissue. Additionally, the expanding stomach may press on the diaphragm, resulting in breathing difficulty. Perhaps more importantly, as the yeast multiplies, it produces alcohols that can be absorbed, resulting in alcohol intoxication. Affected dogs may have distended abdomens and show signs such as a lack of coordination, disorientation, stupor and vomiting (or attempts to vomit). In extreme cases, coma or seizures may occur and could lead to death from alcohol intoxication. Dogs showing mild signs should be closely monitored, and dogs with severe abdominal distention or dogs who are so inebriated that they can?t stand up should be monitored by a veterinarian until they recover.
Chocolate

Chocolate intoxication is most commonly seen around certain holidays?like Easter, Christmas, Halloween and Valentine?s Day?but it can happen any time dogs have access to products that contain chocolate, such as chocolate candy, cookies, brownies, chocolate baking goods, cocoa powder and cocoa shell-based mulches. The compounds in chocolate that cause toxicosis are caffeine and theobromine, which belong to a group of chemicals called methylxanthines. The rule of thumb with chocolate is ?the darker it is, the more dangerous it is.? White chocolate has very few methylxanthines and is of low toxicity. Dark baker?s chocolate has very high levels of methylxanthines, and plain, dry unsweetened cocoa powder contains the most concentrated levels of methylxanthines. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, the signs seen can range from vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort and restlessness to severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures and death. Dogs showing more than mild restlessness should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
Ethanol (Also Known as Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol)

Dogs are far more sensitive to ethanol than humans are. Even ingesting a small amount of a product containing alcohol can cause significant
12 people found this helpful

Hi I have black female pug 1 year old and she has this very tiny bald spots which are bumpy and a little pink in color .i don't think it itches so much since she doesn't scratch a lot.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
it could be superficial pyoderma. kindly use a medicated shampoo once in three days for four times and see if it helps. otherwise it is better to post some pics so that i can see what exactly r u talking about.
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8 Tips For Your Dog This Summer!

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad

1. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water all the time.

2. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside.

3. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day. Avoid 5-7pm evening as the steam emitting from the road can kill your pet with heat stroke!

4. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like coal tar roads) because it can burn your dog's paws.

5. If you feel it's hot outside, it's even hotter for your pet - make sure your pet has a means of cooling off.

6. Keep your dog free of external insects (fleas, ticks) - consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet.

7. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats (talk to your veterinarian first to see if it's appropriate for your pet).

8. If you have a short nose breed like pugs or bulldogs, keep a Turkish towel with you whenever traveling. Whenever you notice he/she is panting heavily, you can soak the towel in water n wrap it around his body to have a local cooling effect.

3 people found this helpful

Sir I have3 year old gsd nd she got crossed with Street dog nd I don't want her to conceive but next day I had already arranged for a matting so now what should I do. After the drug injection should I go for matting option the very next day.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
If she has mated with stray dog than there is no point in going matin with other dog. Now only option is get treatment for mismating an waiting for next heat. Remember: the hormonal treatment for mismating can be associated with side effects.
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Hi doc, my dog has developed a cherry eye. Is there a remedy other than surgery?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Surgery is the best option still can be tried with medication for a month and if not resolved please do the surgery its a elective surgery only no need to hurry .
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Dear Sir, my 4 n years Old Lahaspho male dog has a problem by birth In its both of back legs (slightly bend legs). But it can walk n run well. Now I consulted a my regular doctor for mating, he said my dog legs were weak and it can't mate a dog. Am so upset seeking for a solution. Is there any alternative options to strengthen my dog's legs. Kindly help me.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
If as you say your dog can run and walk, clearily indicates dog has strength. For mating like any living being, the mood should b there to mate and the bitch has to b in heat only then dog will mate. Sinply leave dog with bitch who is to b mated and leave them alone. When a pet dog is left to mate for the first time, it will show shyness and thus may not mate untill bitch provokes the dog.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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4 people found this helpful

Hi, My Lab is 8 years old. And now she has started to Limp on her right leg. I dont know if she is in pain. What should i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Start adult senior diet available in the market for him and give him pet joint capsules each one daily until symptoms subsidise
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My dog is alsation dog.He is 7 years old n he is very active dog.He is suffering from back leg weaknes.Suggest me good medicine for that.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
GSD has arthiritis problem after certain age and ur dog seem to have same. You should start giving his joint supplement like glycoflex
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These's been a lot of hair loss in my dog I have been using petglow tonic from a couple of days but there's no improvement.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please continue with any tonic which contain omega 3 and 6 oil at least for a month and see for the results they all can't produce results in hours. Sir need to wait./// as the damage caused took so much time to disintegrate the skin and you need same or twice time to repair it.
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My chicken has eaten a crocin advanced tablet n very worried about whats going to happen I really am worried is it going to harm it or no please help me and let me know please.

MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bidar
My chicken has eaten a crocin advanced tablet n very worried about whats going to happen I really am worried is it go...
Nothing will happen. Only thing is your pet may be relieved of cold and cough. Most of human medicines work well in pets with least side effects. No worries.
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I am giving treatment for parvo virus for my dog what are the symptoms for decreasing of virus.

BVSc
Veterinarian, Noida
If upto 24 hours, there is no vomiting and loose motion (enteritis, it means it dog has recovered from parvo infection.
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Sir my dog is pomerian it is seven years old I want a remedy for its hair loss ?

MVSC
Veterinarian,
Give a balanced diet for your dog. Shampoo it with medicated shampoo. Do not use phenol compounds for cleaning your floor. Deworm your dog.
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