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Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal  - Urologist, Delhi

Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Urology

Urologist, Delhi

22 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
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Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Urology Urologist, Delhi
22 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal
Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal is a popular Urologist in Paschim Vihar, Delhi. He has over 22 years of experience as a Urologist. He is a MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Urology . You can meet Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal personally at Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute in Paschim Vihar, Delhi. Book an appointment online with Dr. Atul Kumar Agarwal on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Urologists from across India. You will find Urologists with more than 40 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Urologists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MBBS - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 1996
MS - General Surgery - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 2000
MCh - Urology - All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 2006
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Awards and Recognitions
Awarded 1st Prize in NZ USICON 2005
Professional Memberships
Urological Society of India (USI)

Location

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Sri Balaji Action Medical Institute

#FC 34, A-4 Paschim Vihar EAST. Landmark:-Opposite Dda Sports Complex, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
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Akshika Urology & Laparoscopy Centre

C5B/14A, Janakpuri. Landmark: Near Gate No. 4. Delhi, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
500 at clinic
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What Makes One Lose Control of the Urinary Bladder?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB (Urology)
Urologist, Ghaziabad
What Makes One Lose Control of the Urinary Bladder?

What you should know about urinary incontinence.

Urinary incontinence is the inability to hold urine in the bladder because of loss of control of the bladder. The severity may range from temporary to chronic, depending on the cause of this disease. Urinary incontinence is more common in women than men and can be categorized into three types.

Types and symptoms of urinary incontinence

Stress incontinence: this incontinence may occur while participating in any physical activity such as a sudden cough, laugh, sneezing or exercising. The stress here refers to the sudden physical pressure that a person experiences, leading him/her to urinate involuntarily.

Urge incontinence: a sudden, involuntary contraction of the muscular wall of the bladder causes an urgency to urinate. This urgency can be formed by a sudden change in position or sex.

Overflow incontinence: this is more common in men with prostate gland problems, damaged bladder or blocked urethra. The person has an urge to urinate frequently but in small amounts.

Causes of urinary incontinence

There are a number of causes of urinary incontinence ranging from aging to cancer and physical damage to the neurological disorder.

1. Aging: with age, the bladder muscle weakens and the chances of incontinence increases.


Damage: since the pelvic muscles support the bladder any damage to it (surgery or any procedure to remove the uterus) can lead to urinary incontinence.

2. Enlarged prostate: enlargement of the prostate gland in older men may give rise to this condition.

Cancer: urinary incontinence may be associated with untreated prostate cancer, which is a side effect of treatments for it.

3. Menopause: estrogen is a hormone that keeps the lining of bladder and urethra healthy. After menopause the production of estrogen is decreased, increasing the chances of urinary incontinence.

4. Prevention: urinary incontinence is not preventable but some steps can be taken to reduce the risk of it. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, avoiding smoking, practicing pelvic floor exercises, avoiding caffeine and acidic foods and eating more fiber to prevent constipation can help decreasing the risk of it.

'consult'.

Related Tip: Common Symptoms of Urinary Tract Infections Every Woman Should Know

3838 people found this helpful

Hi, I have irritation in my anus. It's pricking and sensation like worms. I have these symptoms more than 4 months, but it's mild. What is the cause? How do I get it cured? Pls let me know. Thanks.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery), FWT (W.B)
Homeopath, 24 Parganas
At night you can use echinatia ointment penetrant your anal canal .you must test RE of stool. Then report.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello lybrate, I want to know that what is the final cure of fissure. My husband has this problem. When he take painkiller and antibiotics he feel relief. But after some time he has same problem. Please suggest me.

M.S. (proctology)
Proctologist, Navi Mumbai
Dear Lybrate user If it is not responding to medicinal management it is better to go for sphincterotomy or anal stretching will helps in healing anal fissure and relieves the pain. It is minor procedure.
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I'm 39 I have echoreflective calculus measuring about 8*4 mm in right upper ureter 2 cm away from pelvis uretic junction.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
I'm 39 I have echoreflective calculus measuring about 8*4 mm in right upper ureter 2 cm away from pelvis uretic junct...
Calculus seems to be big in size and if it is symptomatic than you might have to undergo a procedure for its removal.
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I am 21 years old female I have uti and I have used antibiotics for 3 days prescribed by doctor for 3 days symptoms gone they are coming backslightly do I need urine test and what will that reveal?

MD - Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), Diploma in Yog and Ayurveda
Ayurveda, Navi Mumbai
I am 21 years old female I have uti and I have used antibiotics for 3 days prescribed by doctor for 3 days symptoms g...
Dear Lybrate user, there might be recurrence of infection. please repeat your Urine investigation as it will reveal about the same. If the examination comes positive, please consult your doctor and take antibiotics for 5 days. If it comes negative, relax and have liquid diet for couple of days, take plenty water (4 litresa day). please remember a renal stone also shows same signs and symptoms of urine infection, and to rule this out a sonography of abdomen is required. Feel free to consult privately for further information and treatment guidelines. Thank you.
1 person found this helpful
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I have pain near buttock n anal. But it feels like there is a tumor over there. When I touch it pain. I can feel the difference between both buttocks. What it could be. What type of doctor I should be concerned.in my precious query I did not mention anything about any kind of tumor. please help.

MBBS
General Surgeon, Hubli-Dharwad
Anal pain also known as proctalgia common causes:- 1.anal fissure-An anal fissure is a small tear in the skin of the anus that can be caused by passing a large or hard poo. Symptoms of an anal fissure can include: a severe, sharp pain when doing a poo a burning or gnawing pain that lasts several hours after doing a poo rectal bleeding – you may notice a small amount of blood on the toilet paper after you wipe Anal fissures can be very painful, but many heal on their own in a few weeks. Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet, drinking plenty of fluids and taking laxatives and over-the-counter painkillers can help. If the pain persists, you may need special ointment that relaxes the ring of muscle around your anus. Occasionally, surgery may be needed to help the fissure heal. 2.Haemorrhoids (piles) Haemorrhoids (piles) are swellings containing enlarged blood vessels that are found inside or around the bottom. They're often thought to be caused by straining on the toilet as a result of prolonged constipation. In many cases, haemorrhoids don't cause symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they may include: bleeding after doing a poo an itchy bottom feeling like there's a lump in or around your anus soreness and redness around your anus anal pain, if the blood supply to the haemorrhoid becomes blocked or interrupted – for example, by a blood clot The symptoms often pass after a few days. Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet, drinking plenty of fluids and taking laxatives and over-the-counter painkillers can help. If the blood supply to the haemorrhoid has been blocked by a clot, a simple procedure can be carried out to remove the clot under local anaesthetic (where the area is numbed). 3.Anal fistulas and abscesses An anal fistula is a small tunnel that develops between the end of the bowel and the skin near the anus. It's usually caused by an infection near the anus resulting in a collection of pus (an abscess). Symptoms of an anal fistula or abscess can include: a constant, throbbing pain that may be worse when you sit down skin irritation around the anus passing pus or blood when you poo swelling and redness around your anus a high temperature (fever) Your GP may prescribe antibiotics if an abscess is picked up early on. If it persists, it may need to be drained in hospital, possibly under general anaesthetic (while you're asleep). If a fistula develops, surgery will usually be needed because they rarely heal by themselves Less common causes of anal pain When to get medical advice Many common causes of anal pain will improve with simple self-care treatments, so you don't always need to see your GP. But it's a good idea to see your GP if: your pain is severe your pain doesn't improve after a few days you also experience rectal bleeding Don't feel embarrassed to see your GP – anal pain is a common problem that they're used to seeing. Your GP can try to work out what the problem is and give you treatment advice. They'll probably ask to see your bottom and may carry out a rectal examination (where they gently insert a gloved finger into your bottom) to check for any abnormalities. If the cause is not immediately obvious, they may refer you to a specialist for advice and further tests.
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4 Preventive Measures For Kidney Stones

MCh Urology, MS - General Surgery, DNB (General Surgery), MBBS
Urologist, Chennai
4 Preventive Measures For Kidney Stones

The pair of kidneys that human beings have, forms an important part in the excretory system. They perform specific and important functions. They excrete urine as well as help in eliminating the toxins, which accumulate in the body. Kidney stones occur when the minerals present in the urine without being discharged, keep on accumulating. This gives rise to an extremely painful and uncomfortable situation. Though sometimes the situation gets revoked all by itself, many a times it requires medical intervention. 

Some of the symptoms of kidney stones are

  1. Excruciating pain in the back
  2. Pain while urinating
  3. Tendencies to vomit
  4. Dizziness
  5. Fever 

However, there are several preventive measures which you can undertake in order to avert the situation. Some of them are:

  1. Drink lots of water: Kidney stone is one of those rare conditions that once occurred, always carry the latent threat of recurring again. Therefore, drinking water in large quantities becomes essential. The more you drink water, the more frequently you would urinate, thereby curbing the chances of the minerals settling in the kidneys.
  2. Avoid certain foods: Food like beets, spinach, those which are replete with calcium oxalate should be avoided in order to minimize chances of having kidney stones.
  3. Change your diet: If you are trying to avoid the eventuality of developing kidney stones, it is imperative that you change your diet a bit. It is recommended that you exclude animal protein as much as possible and assiduously avoid the intake of salt as much as possible.
  4. Take less calcium supplements: Calcium generally is considered a nemesis to your kidneys and is prescribed by doctors to be avoided. However recent research has thwarted this claim. Calcium does not pose a threat to kidneys. However calcium supplements definitely do and therefore, should be avoided.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2974 people found this helpful
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