Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Ankush

Veterinarian, Delhi

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Ankush Veterinarian, Delhi
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Ankush
Dr. Ankush is a trusted Veterinarian in Vasant Kunj, Delhi. Doctor is currently practising at Pet Hospital and Boarding Shelter in Vasant Kunj, Delhi. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Ankush on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Ankush

Pet Hospital and Boarding Shelter

Shop No C-9/7, Masoodpur Market, Vasant Kunj. Landmark: Opposite LIG Flats, DelhiDelhi Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Ankush

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My bitch her age is 10 month her breed is german sphep. She left all food evn now she is nt having milk please doctor give me a solution She is having antibiotics which is giving by doctor bcz 28/ 7 /2017 her temp. Was 103 antibiotics are 1. DOXCYLINE HYCLATE & BROMHEXINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLETS 2. MEFTAL -P.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi lybrate-user, Did the temperature become normal? Use multi vitamins like pet up syrup, if milk not taking just give curd rice to improve healthy bacteria in stomach and can improve appetite.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

My pet dog scooby,12 years old,eats well ,passes normal stools.But always sleeping.Not active as before.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Age might be a problem , still need to rule out systemic diseases and cardiac function. Try liver supplement with your vets advice.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My pet 6 months old golden retriever in fed on golden retriever junior royal canin and the vet has suggested some human supplements like feroglobin and calicmax is it safe for him ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Yes its safe , even the human can have the tablets when its safe to the animals . So dont worry . I use nearly 95 % of medicine in human field only . And regarding dosage please consult your vet in supplementing it.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Summer Management For Dogs!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

Summer can mean lots of fun outside with your dog. But when the temps soar, take steps to protect your pet. Whether you take him for a walk down the street, a ride in the car, or just out in the yard to play, the heat can be hard on him. Here's how to keep your furry best friend safe.

1. Never leave your dog in the car. No, not even if you think you’ll only be a few minutes. Even when it isn’t that hot outside, the temp can soar inside a closed car. On an 85-degree day, it can reach 102 F within 10 minutes. And that's with a window cracked. After 30 minutes, it could be up to 120. Leave your dog at home, or go places where he can come with you.

2. Keep your house cool. If Fido’s home alone, make sure he can truly chill. Leave the air conditioner on and close the drapes. If you don't have AC, open the windows and turn on a fan. You may want to try a cooling vest or mat to see if they help.

3. Watch when you exercise. Limit when and how much you do when it's hot and humid. Take walks in the cooler part of the day, in the early morning and evening hours. Carry water, too -- enough for both of you.

4. Check the pavement. Before you head out for a walk, touch the pavement. If it's too hot for your hand, it's too hot for your dog's paw pads. Walk on the grass and stay off the asphalt. You also might want to try booties for your dog so his paws don’t burn.

5. Offer plenty of water and shade. Don't leave your pooch alone outside for long. And when he is there, make sure he has shade and lots of fresh, cool water. Add ice cubes when you can. Trees are better than doghouses for shade. They let air flow through. Doghouses can trap the heat and make it worse. Think about a kiddie pool or a sprinkler to help your pal cool off in the yard.Make cool treats. Help your canine chill from the inside out. For puppy popsicles, make ice cubes with tasty treats inside. Or fill and freeze a chew toy to make a chilly snack.

6. Keep an eye on the humidity, too. When the air is full of moisture, your dog may not be able to pant enough to cool himself off. That can raise his temperature, which can lead to heatstroke. Stay inside, and limit exercise, too.

7. Take care of at-risk dogs. Be watchful if you have a snub-nosed pet like a pug or bulldog. Their smaller airways make it harder for them to release heat when they pant. It's also easy for old and overweight dogs, or those with heart and breathing problems, to get heatstroke.

8. Groom your pet. If your dog has long hair, get rid of any mats and tangles. It will help keep him cool. Don't shave or clip his coat before you talk to your vet or groomer. The extra fur that keeps him warm in winter may also keep him cool in summer.

9. Watch for signs of overheating. Your dog can't tell you when he doesn't feel well, so keep an eye out for heatstroke, which can have these symptoms:

  • Heavy panting
  • Heavy drooling
  • Trouble breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Dark or red gums and tongue
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Agitation
1 person found this helpful

My dog aged 12+ breed Shiba Inu is suffering from wound on back feet & testicle.We apply Neomycin+polymyxin B Sulphate+basitratin Zinc Powder.Please guide us what should we do ?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
This is case of Scrotal dermatitis case. Even after applying ointment u should consult ur vet for oral medications.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My 7 years old labrador has been dull for the last 15 days, appetite normal, had blood in stool 2 days ago, blood test revealed low BUN at 7.24, elevated sgot at 69.63, elevated alkaline phosphatase at 107. Xrays and ultrasound revealed enlarged spleen. Stool test showed presence of pus cells, blood. He has had thyroid issue for the last 3 years for which we give him thyronorm 100 daily. What disease could he possibly have?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
How are his platelets? bun could be low because of long term fasting or because of reduced generation by liver. In latter case, get him blood ammonia levels checked. Its a test to done immediately (within 1 hr latest) after the blood is drawn. I would not consider sgpo and alkaline phosphatase elevated at those levels, however laboratory standards are different everywhere. Discuss following things with your vet. 1) contribution of ammonia levels in dullness. 2) possible underdosing of thyroid hormone supplements. For which, you can sent his blood 4-6 hrs post tablet, to see if 100mcg dose is helping you to achieve normal blood levels. If not, you may need to increase dosing and make it twice daily, after discussing with your vet. Hope this is helpful.
16 people found this helpful

Hello sir, my dog is having loose motion from 3 Days and he is not eating anything only he is drinking water. Is my dog seriously ill. What should i do. Please help me sir please

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
SURE WHAT DR.KAUSTUBH GARUD SAY IS MORE APPROPRIATE NEED TO PROVIDED BACK UP DETAILS WHEN U NEED A SUGGESTION
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi. 5 days before my dog died Without any symptoms. In my village nearly 30 dogs died within 10 days. Can you please tell what may be the reason.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, the reason may be silent form of rabies. If one dog effected, the other dogs also may be effected. Or if any food poisoning at the same place. Check once. Or take one to nearest vet for proper diagnosis.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed