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Mr. Karan

Veterinarian, Dehradun

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Mr. Karan Veterinarian, Dehradun
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

7 WAYS TO KEEP FOR YOUR DOG S COAT - GLOSSY AND SHINY

BVSc
Veterinarian, Rajkot

Once you know that your dog is in tip-top shape, here are some other things you can do to encourage his or her coat to come out shiny and soft.

  1. Omega fatty acid: These are full of healthy omega-3 fatty acids that help contribute to a healthy coat, plus they’re delicious to a dog! Add some to the dog’s food.
  2. Brush: Regular brushing stimulates the skin and hair follicles, which increases the natural production of skin oils that make the coat shiny. Brush your dog at least once every other day.
  3. Bath: How often depends on your dog, the length of the coat, and how dirty he or she gets. Bathing once a month is a good general guideline—often enough to keep the coat clean, but not so often that you’re stripping the coat of essential oils. Use a moisturizing shampoo that won’t irritate skin. Consider adding a natural conditioner afterwards—those that contain vitamin E are soothing to the skin and hair. Some owners use coconut milk on the pet’s fur for several minutes before bath time.
  4. A little oil: Stir one teaspoon to one tablespoon of vegetable oil into your dog’s food to keep the coat healthy. Try sunflower, flaxseed, olive, coconut, and safflower, but don’t give them too much—that can lead to diarrhea. Coconut oil may also help clear up skin conditions.
  5. Herbal remedies: Try horsetail, as it’s high in silica, which is essential in the maintenance of healthy and strong skin, bones, and fur. Spirulina is another natural ingredient that contains protein, B vitamins, and carotenoids. Be cautious, though, not to use too much. Check with your vet on dosage.
  6. Protection: Dogs who have no shelter from the elements and are kept outside most days will have coats that change to be more thick and dry simply to provide natural protection. You can just let it be for the colder winter months, or provide additional shelter to encourage a shinier coat.
  7. Oatmeal Bath: Dogs with dull coats often have skin problems, as well. An oatmeal bath helps sooth the skin, tame itching, and leaves the coat soft and shiny. Oatmeal contains vitamin E, so it works as a natural softener. Simply grind one-cup plain oatmeal into a fine powder, fill a tub with lukewarm water, add the powder and stir in until the water appears cloudy, then place your dog in the bath. Pour water on its back and head, avoiding the eyes, and massage for 10-15 minutes. Rinse and pat dry.
2 people found this helpful

I have a rottweiler puppy about 70 days old got problem in his rear legs i.e lameness. As one Dr. Told me that he got ligament problem in his rear legs. He got this problem after about 50 days. Before that he was alright. Now could you please guide me what is best solution for this problem.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc- Veterinary Surgery and Radiology
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hello, mostly dogs at this age are in fast growing stage and problem like this can either increase or get resolved. It depends on which region is affected so getting an x ray of back legs will help to find the extent of problem. Till that give some pain medication to dog n avoid slippery floor n commercial dog food.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is not eating very well, She is very active though? Wanted to know the reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
As far as she is active there is no problem , her appetite is of very low level , can give liver supplements to improve their diet patterns . Please consult your vet
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I had got a fallen squirrel baby so what should I feed him and how to keep him warm ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use a carton box with 60 watts buld ata distance of 1.5 feet above the baby so that the box get heated and in frequent interval switch off and on it and feed him with cerlac in semi diluted state with syringe.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is alsation dog.He is 7 years old n he is very active dog.He is suffering from back leg weaknes.Suggest me good medicine for that.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
GSD has arthiritis problem after certain age and ur dog seem to have same. You should start giving his joint supplement like glycoflex
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Preventive Health care: As pets age faster than humans, a year is a long time in a dog's life. We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden.
It is recommended that every pet should receive a general health evaluation once in 6 months. A preventive health visit should cover following aspects:
• Vaccination status
• Parasite control for intestinal parasites, ear mites, ticks and fleas.
• Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odours, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
• Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
• Exercise - how much exercise your dog receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your dog's ability to exercise
• Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
• Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
• Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
• Behaviour – any behaviour problems such as barking, changes in temperament, any obsessive behaviour, urinary accidents
• Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
• Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
• Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, Neutering - if it has not already been performed
• Blood tests – especially for geriatric dogs, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
6 people found this helpful

MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bidar
Its winter time, keep your pets warm and provide sufficient nutrition to avoid hair loss.
5 people found this helpful
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