Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. D. Siva Kumar

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVMS

Veterinarian, Coimbatore

9 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. D. Siva Kumar BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVMS Veterinarian, Coimbatore
9 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. D. Siva Kumar
Dr. D. Siva Kumar is a trusted Veterinarian in Saibaba Colony, Coimbatore. Doctor has helped numerous patients in his/her 9 years of experience as a Veterinarian. Doctor is a qualified BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science), MVMS . Doctor is currently associated with SKS Veterinary Hospital in Saibaba Colony, Coimbatore. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. D. Siva Kumar on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 33 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Veterinarians online in Coimbatore. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science) - Madras University - 2009
MVMS - Madras University - 2013
Professional Memberships
Indian Veterinary Association

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. D. Siva Kumar

SKS Veterinary Hospital

#72,bharathi park,saibaba colony ,landmark : near corporation bank ,NSR road ,coimbatore, Landmark : near corporation bank, CoimbatoreCoimbatore Get Directions
150 at clinic
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. D. Siva Kumar

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My dog suffering from skin disease for last onemonth.We have done pus culture it was found Moderate-STAPHYLOCOCCUS INTERMRDIUS and sensitive to most of antibiotics.The doctor recommended CLINDAMYCIN 50mg daily for 5days which is being given further 75 md is recommended for next 10 days.And putiing kiskin oinment over affected area.The improvement is visible.1) his diet has gone down. What appetizer is to be given to boost up diet.It is NINE yrs old.Lhasa Mixed breed.2) any other precaution to be taken?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Hi . Please explore if his urination has changed lately. Does he drink excess water too? Is he lethargic? How are his stools? If So, kindly get a blood work done. Clindamycin can sometimes burden kidneys, and its wise to be careful in a patient aging 9 yrs. Possible to share his antibiogram(culture and sensitivity) report? Staph intermedius is a common skin pathogen, and i'm glad that its sensitive to most antibiotics at the moment - but can mutate into resistant strain if not treated judiciously. Hope this is helpful.

Sir I have a golden retriever puppy of 30 days old nw it has fleas on it nw I afraid weather they will be gone by anti fleas powder or they will not.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., MVS
Veterinarian, Ahmedabad
Sir I have a golden retriever puppy of 30 days old nw it has fleas on it nw I afraid weather they will be gone by ant...
Notix/Bolfo powder is the only compound safe enough to use on such a young puppy. When using that remember to brush out the coat after application. Also, since he has fleas, he must also be dewormed with a puppy dewormer.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My 6 month old golden retriever is scared to go out for walks as he was bitten by stay dog for which we got the treatment now how to bringe back the confidence in him &how to prevent this kind of incident in the future

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Walk with lease saftey have a whip stick for safety of your pet. And try to mingle your pet with near by pets so he get confidence on other animal with whom he moves
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog was bitten on her ear by a dog and is pregnant also and so can she take antibiotic like cavity or it will cause harm. If she can't take cavity then what should be done to treat her ear.

Phd (PHARMACOLGY)
Veterinarian, Durgapur
My dog was bitten on her ear by a dog and is pregnant also and so can she take antibiotic like cavity or it will caus...
You have not told how many days your dog is pregnant and whether the dog did bite your dog is rabid. These two information were v important. Okay if dog is not rabid. Don'tworrying. Go to a vet and and give your dog a tetvac and let the vet dress the injured ears as he think suitable. U can apply local antibiotic ointment for easy healing if your vet Doc keep wound open. No need to worry and give oral/injectable antibiotics and if the culprit dog is not rabid.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Pet Care

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi

Allow your animal to live in its own habitat. Means at the end of day take your pet to the place where it can run for 5-10 mts (dogs, cats), large animals (cattle, buffalo, etc) to a place where it can rome free for at least 15-20 mts you will find productivity of the animal will increase appreciably

3 people found this helpful

I have a dog he is too moody about food. What should I do to balance his proper diet?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should keep your dog on particular feed according to his age. Don't give treats in between esp. Our biscuits, just because he is not eating. Follow this routine for 15 days. Proper discipline is required to change behavior.
5 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My female spitz aged 2yr limps frequently, as if she has pain in her hind legs. What could be the possible reason?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Check the paws and other inter digits for the foreign bodies and any history of ticks in the body for the past 4-5 months pls let me know
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a pug, and i think he is having some kind of rashes and hair fall. What do i do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Please share information about his diet and if possible pics of the skin rashes. Pugs commonly get skin fold dermatitis or it could also be dietary intolerance/allergy or skin infection. The treatment will vary depending on the cause.

How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful
View All Feed