Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. V.Venkataramanujam

Veterinarian, Chennai

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. V.Venkataramanujam Veterinarian, Chennai
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. V.Venkataramanujam
Dr. V.Venkataramanujam is a trusted Veterinarian in Besant Nagar, Chennai. You can visit him/her at Sai Veterinary Clinic in Besant Nagar, Chennai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. V.Venkataramanujam on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. V.Venkataramanujam

Sai Veterinary Clinic

#22, 26th Cross Street, Besant Nagar. Landmark: Next To Rajaji Bavan, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. V.Venkataramanujam

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

Sir, We have a rescued Pointerdor female dog. She is a lovely dog but very very nervous the moment she steps out of the house. Please help.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Nothing to worry, if her feeding habits and other things are normal, play lot like a kid for few weeks.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hello my dear sir. A injured sparrow suffering with problem. The sparrow fall into gum and its one side wing has wounded. It can't use its one side wing. What can I do now. Please reply me as soon as possible.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
U can clean the whole body with luke warm water gently and tie that wing close to the body for healing. This is to make sure the sparrow doesn't use that wing for any purpose for few days and allow any possible healing faster. Another option is to go to a Vet in person who has the experience on birds, get an X- Ray and overall status of what exactly has happened inside and it's prognosis.
Submit FeedbackFeedback
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog. Labrador. 5 yrs old has thyroid. He is been told to have thyroxine sodium tablet. 100mg everyday in the morning empty stomach. Is the medication fine for him. Please let me know.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
The treatment for hypothyroidism advised to your pet is alright. The protocol for treating such patients vary according to the condition of the pet, requirement of dose depending on the test reports and its clinical manifestation. So it is not possible to give any advice without examining the patient and its blood reports. Better have an opinion from nearby vet after examination only. Thank you.
6 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Monsoon Concerns - Leptospirosis.!!!!

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Monsoon Concerns - Leptospirosis.!!!!
Monsoon may be a great time to go outdoors with your pets and enjoy the rains. But be aware of the hidden dangers.

- leptospirosis is around and can cause lethal liver and kidney disease in dogs.
- water logging in metro cities can be a source of such fatal infections. Transmitted via urine of rats/dead rats --> Dogs can readily become infected despite vaccinations.
- common in farms too, wherever there is rat population.
- leptospirosis is a contagious to humans as well, and infected dogs, their urine becomes an important carrier for humans.
- initial signs include vomiting, jaundice, reduced urination, kidney failure.
- if not identified and treated early, it can become fatal.
- early diagnosis and specific treatment can save your pet.
- proper precautions and hygiene can save your family from exposure.
- do not let your pets walk through, or drink from water puddles.

Please speak to us for more information on this.
Have a safe monsoon!
11 people found this helpful

My 48 days old male Labrador will need vaccinations. What vaccinations are suggested in this age (and cost)?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
45 th -50th days .9 in one (nobivac,virbac,megavac) 60 th -70th day .same as booster. 90th -100th day .rabies 270 th - 300 day .rabies booster is the schedule for whole 1 st year which i practice . its a combination of asian subcontinent and england mixed protocol
Submit FeedbackFeedback
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have parrots and I want treatment for them as they are losing their feathers. Please suggest.

MVSc
Veterinarian,
In birds, the feather fall is mainly due to two problems, 1. Vitamin and mineral deficiency - You can use mineral supplements to overcome this problem. 2. Mite infestation - anti parasitic drugs can be used to get ride of mites. But firstly you have to find out, due to which reason of the above your parrot is having feather fall and treat it, is your parrot having self pecking habit, does it takes feed normally, does it always feels uncomfortable.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Varanasi
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

View All Feed