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Dr. V. Dhananjayan

BVSc

Veterinarian, Chennai

35 Years Experience
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Dr. V. Dhananjayan BVSc Veterinarian, Chennai
35 Years Experience
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Personal Statement

My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. V. Dhananjayan
Dr. V. Dhananjayan is a popular Veterinarian in Appasamy Hospital, Chennai. He has over 35 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He is a qualified BVSc . He is currently practising at Dr.Dhananjayan's Sai Vet Hospital in Appasamy Hospital, Chennai. Book an appointment online with Dr. V. Dhananjayan and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
BVSc - Chennai Veterinarian College - 1983
Languages spoken
English

Location

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Dr.Dhananjayan's Sai Vet Hospital

12, 22nd Street, Jai Nagar, Chennai , Landmark: Opp to CNBTChennai Get Directions
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I'm having Labrador of age 2 months when it was baby his fur is too shiny and good but now it is dull is thr any remedy for it and any tonics for his bone and body weight.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use verol multivitamin tonic with calcium tonic and also give him nutricoat plus advantage for few months you can appreciate changes
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My dog is 1 month old. It is a Pomeranian breed. What all food can be given to him? Can I give him a bath?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
My dog is 1 month old. It is a Pomeranian breed. What all food can be given to him? Can I give him a bath?
No bath till he is of 3 months old. Till then you can use puppy wipes and dry shampoos available at the pet stores. For food, please give one cup of 80℅ diluted milk mixed with one raw egg and 1 small tsp coconut oil. Twice a day. Puppy chew stix for dental health. One cup of royal canine mini junior once a day.
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My Female Puppy is of 3 month and always bites when anyone touch her I had went to vet clinic doctor has given medicine to her but still she is doing same things, her gums also swelling doctor told that new teeth is coming so this is common can you please suggest me what care should I take for not biting & which food should I give her.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Teething is normal process. But you should give training to your puppy that he should not bite. You can also give him some toys or chews to play.
5 people found this helpful
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What vaccine should we take for my 5th month kitten? And this is the first vaccination for my kitten.

BHMS
Homeopath, Hooghly
There are series of vaccines been given in every 3-4 weeks intetval upto age of 16 weeks. Which vaccine have to be given that decided by the veterinary doctor on the basis of age, medical history, environment etc. Soo you will hv to visit your veternary doctor.
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I have just adopted labrador pup he is 35 days old. My concern is when should I get him his 1st vaccination. As from whom I adopted he said on 42 days direct booster I consulted 1 vet doctor he said you should start from, 33 days age I am confused. Kindly guide He wants to bite on everything I think he is getting irritated as his teeth are erupting kindly reply.

BVSc
Veterinarian, Noida
Vaccination from vet should start from 45 day of puppy birth. Its the time when dhppi or 9 in 1 or 7 in 1 vaccine starts. This vaccine mainly immunes puppy from diseases like parvo and distemper. Upto 4 and half month, a series of vaccines will be given to puppy. Consult your nearby vet and go for vaccination whenever he or she calls your puppy.
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My Dog name is bruzoo, my dog is labera. he is very week and my dog is nothing eat like food pedigree and my dog leg is very slim. Please help me.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You can start giving high nutritious diet to you dog like egg, chicken paneer etc. You can give him good quality feed like pedigree professional or royal canin for growth.
2 people found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
What Makes Chocolate Poisonous to Dogs?

Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain caffeine and a related chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger.

The problem is that dogs metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans, reported by Denver veterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, tells WebMD.

“The buzz we get from eating chocolate may last 20 to 40 minutes, but for dogs it lasts many hours,” he says. “After 17 hours, half of the theobromine a dog has ingested is still in the system.”

Theobromine is also toxic to cats, but there are very few reported cases of theobromine poisoning in felines because they rarely eat chocolate.

Dogs, on the other hand, will eat just about anything.

Even small amounts of chocolate can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Truly toxic amounts can induce hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.
2 people found this helpful

I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
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