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Dr. R.Suryakumar  - Psychologist, Chennai

Dr. R.Suryakumar

M.Phil - Psychology, PhD - Psychology

Psychologist, Chennai

750 at clinic
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Dr. R.Suryakumar M.Phil - Psychology, PhD - Psychology Psychologist, Chennai
750 at clinic
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Personal Statement

Life is too beautiful to be spent worrying...more
Life is too beautiful to be spent worrying
More about Dr. R.Suryakumar
Suryakumar is a Counseling Psychologist & Life Coach at MANAS Counseling Sevices, Purasawalkam, Chennai. He is the President of TA Study Circle (Madras)

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Education
M.Phil - Psychology - Tamil Nadu Open University -
PhD - Psychology - Pursuing In Bharathiar University -
Professional Memberships
INDIAN ASSOCIATION OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY
Indian Psychiatric Society

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MANAS Counseling Services

21, Venkatachalam Street, 1st floor,Chennai Get Directions
750 at clinic
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Sometimes I easily forgot the terms when I study or I do not easily recall the names of persons I met before, maybe I have now a memory loss problem, can you recommend to me a medicine preferably herbal that can help improve my memory loss problem?

MSC Human Development , Hypnotherapy , Special Educator , ms- counselling and physiotherapy, Applied psychology Hons
Psychologist, Faridabad
Consult with a neurologist near by you. Do some brain exercises try to keep yourself calm and energetic with some breathing and relaxation exercise. Eat all night socked almonds daily. A herbal syrup I can suggest you is (shankh pushpi from baiydnath). If you want any other help you can contact us.
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Dear doctor Is chronic anxiety the next stage of stress? Is the anxiety very stressful?

M.Sc Applied Psychology, Advanced Diploma Child Guidance & Counselling
Psychologist, Delhi
Dear doctor
Is chronic anxiety the next stage of stress? Is the anxiety very stressful?
Dear lybrate user anxiety can be reaction to stress. It's natural to feel anxious when we are in stressful situation. Our body has capacity to deal with challenging situations like stress. But when we feel that we have used all pur resources to fight with it then our body start developing symptoms like tension, worry, anxiety, depression etc. So it's important to keep ourselves mentally healthy too. Our brain too need good mentally healthy diet. Take care.
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I am 20 years old boy. I have a problem that I think too much, over analyze things and I get very scared thinking of the negative results of everything I say, do, write. Please suggest some tips for help.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I am 20 years old boy. I have a problem that I think too much, over analyze things and I get very scared thinking of ...
Hi there, Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 1: Look at your worries in new ways You may feel like your worries come from the outside—from other people, events that stress you out, or difficult situations you’re facing. But, in fact, worrying is self-generated. The trigger comes from the outside, but an internal running dialogue maintains the anxiety itself. When you’re worrying, you’re talking to yourself about things you’re afraid of or negative events that might happen. You run over the feared situation in your mind and think about all the ways you might deal with it. In essence, you’re trying to solve problems that haven’t happened yet, or worse, simply obsessing on worst-case scenarios. All this worrying may give you the impression that you’re protecting yourself by preparing for the worst or avoiding bad situations. But more often than not, worrying is unproductive—sapping your mental and emotional energy without resulting in any concrete problem-solving strategies or actions. Once you’ve given up the idea that your worrying somehow helps you, you can start to deal with your worry and anxiety in more productive ways. This may involve challenging irrational worrisome thoughts, learning how to postpone worrying, and learning to accept uncertainty in your life. Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 2: Get moving Exercise is a natural and effective anti-anxiety treatment. It relieves tension and stress, boosts physical and mental energy, and enhances well-being through the release of endorphins, the brain’s feel-good chemicals. Any exercise that engages both your arms and legs—such as walking, running, swimming, or dancing—can be especially effective. Instead of continuing to focus on your thoughts as you exercise, though, try focusing on how your body feels as you move. Try to notice the sensation of your feet hitting the ground, for example, or the rhythm of your breathing, or the feeling of the wind on your skin. By adding this mindfulness element, by really focusing on your body and how it feels as you exercise, you’ll not only improve your physical condition faster, but you may also be able to interrupt the flow of constant worries running through your head. Many people find weight training, rock climbing, boxing, or martial arts especially effective as these activities make it easier to maintain your focus on your body movements—after all, if you don’t, you could get hurt. For maximum relief of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), try to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days—or three 10-minute sessions if that’s more convenient. Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 3: Practice relaxation techniques Anxiety is more than just a feeling. It’s the body’s physical “fight or flight” reaction to a perceived threat. Your heart pounds, you breathe faster, your muscles tense up, and you feel light-headed. When you’re relaxed, the complete opposite happens. Your heart rate slows down, you breathe slower and more deeply, your muscles relax, and your blood pressure stabilizes. Since it’s impossible to be anxious and relaxed at the same time, strengthening your body’s relaxation response is a powerful anxiety-relieving tactic. If you struggle with GAD, relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, and meditation can teach you how to relax. Progressive muscle relaxation can help you release muscle tension and take a “time out” from your worries. The technique involves systematically tensing and then releasing different muscle groups in your body. As your body relaxes, your mind will follow. Deep breathing. When you’re anxious, you breathe faster. This hyperventilation causes symptoms such as dizziness, breathlessness, lightheadedness, and tingly hands and feet. These physical symptoms are frightening, leading to further anxiety and panic. But by breathing deeply from the diaphragm, you can reverse these symptoms and calm yourself down. Meditation. Research shows that mindfulness meditation can actually change your brain. With regular practice, meditation boosts activity on the left side of the prefrontal cortex, the area of the brain responsible for feelings of serenity and joy. Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 4: Learn to calm down quickly Many people with generalized anxiety disorder don’t know how to quickly calm and soothe themselves. But it’s a simple, easy technique to learn, and it can make a drastic difference in your anxiety symptoms. The best methods for self-soothing incorporate one or more of the physical senses: vision, hearing, smell, taste, and touch—or movement. Try the following self-soothing suggestions when your GAD symptoms are acting up: Sight – Take in a beautiful view. Look at treasured photos, works of art, or funny videos online. Close your eyes and picture a place that feels peaceful and rejuvenating. Sound – Listen to soothing music. Call an old friend. Sing or hum a favorite tune. Enjoy the sounds of nature: birds singing, ocean waves crashing on the beach, wind rustling through the trees. Smell – Light scented candles. Smell the flowers in a garden. Breathe in the clean, fresh air. Spritz on your favorite perfume. Taste – Slowly eat a favorite treat, savoring each bite. Enjoy a hot cup of coffee or herbal tea. Touch – Pet your dog or cat. Wrap yourself in a soft blanket. Sit outside in the cool breeze. Give yourself a hand or neck massage. Movement – Go for a walk or run, dance around, jump up and down or gently stretch. For more tips on using your senses to quickly calm yourself, see Stress Relief in the Moment. Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 5: Connect with others Support from other people is vital to overcoming generalized anxiety disorder. In fact, GAD only gets worse when you feel powerless and alone. Social interaction with someone who cares about you is the most effective way to calm your nervous system and diffuse anxiety, so it’s important to find someone you can connect with face to face on a regular basis—someone you can talk to for an uninterrupted period of time, someone who will listen to you without judging, criticizing, or continually being distracted by the phone or other people. That person may be your significant other, a family member, or a friend. How GAD can get in the way of connecting with others While the more connected you are to other people, the less vulnerable you’ll feel, but the catch-22 is that having GAD can lead to problems in your relationships. For example, anxiety and constant worrying about your close relationships may leave you feeling needy and insecure. Identify unhealthy relationship patterns. Think about the ways you tend to act when you’re feeling anxious about a relationship. Do you test your partner? Withdraw? Make accusations? Become clingy? Once you’re aware of any anxiety-driven relationship patterns, you can look for better ways to deal with any fears or insecurities you’re feeling. Build a strong support system. Human beings are social creatures. We’re not meant to live in isolation. But a strong support system doesn’t necessarily mean a vast network of friends. Don’t underestimate the benefit of a few people you can trust and count on to be there for you. Talk it out when your worries start spiraling. If you start to feel overwhelmed with anxiety, meet with a trusted family member or friend. Just talking face to face about your worries can make them seem less threatening. Know who to avoid when you’re feeling anxious. Your anxious take on life may be something you learned when you were growing up. If your mother is a chronic worrier, she is not the best person to call when you’re feeling anxious—no matter how close you are. When considering who to turn to, ask yourself whether you tend to feel better or worse after talking to that person about a problem. Generalized anxiety disorder treatment tip 6: Change your lifestyle A healthy, balanced lifestyle plays a big role in keeping the symptoms of GAD at bay. In addition to regular exercise, try these other lifestyle choices to tackle chronic anxiety and worry: Adopt healthy eating habits Start the day right with breakfast, and try to eat regularly to avoid getting too hungry between meals. Going too long without eating leads to low blood sugar, which can make you feel anxious and irritable. Eat plenty of complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Not only do complex carbs stabilize blood sugar, they also boost serotonin, a neurotransmitter with calming effects. Limit caffeine and sugar Stop drinking or at least cut back on caffeinated beverages, including soda, coffee, and tea. Caffeine can increase anxiety, interfere with sleep, and even provoke panic attacks. Reduce the amount of refined sugar you eat, too. Sugary snacks and desserts cause blood sugar to spike and then crash, leaving you feeling emotionally and physically drained. But sweet foods are only part of the problem: a lot of processed and convenience foods are packed with sources of hidden sugar. Read the labels and focus more on eating “real food”: unprocessed fruit and vegetables and healthy sources of protein. Avoid alcohol and nicotine Alcohol temporarily reduces anxiety and worry, but it actually makes anxiety symptoms worse as it wears off. While it may seem like cigarettes are calming, nicotine is actually a powerful stimulant that leads to higher, not lower, levels of anxiety. Get enough sleep Anxiety and worry can cause insomnia, as anyone whose racing thoughts have kept them up at night can attest. But lack of sleep can also contribute to anxiety. When you’re sleep deprived, your ability to handle stress is compromised. When you’re well rested, it’s much easier to keep your emotional balance, a key factor in coping with anxiety and stopping worry. Improve your sleep at night by changing any daytime habits or bedtime routines that can contribute to sleeplessness. When to seek therapy for generalized anxiety disorder treatment If you can’t seem to shake your worries and fears, despite trying the self-help treatment tips, it may be time to seek professional help. To get an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment, it’s best to see a mental health professional. But remember that professional treatment doesn’t replace self-help. In order to control your GAD symptoms, you’ll still want to make lifestyle changes and look at the ways you think about worrying. Professional treatment for GAD Therapy is a key component of treatment for generalized anxiety disorder. Many studies show that therapy is as effective as medication for most people. And best of all, therapy for generalized anxiety disorder is side-effect free. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is one type of therapy that is particularly helpful in the treatment of GAD. CBT examines distortions in our ways of looking at the world and ourselves. Your therapist will help you identify automatic negative thoughts that contribute to your anxiety. For example, if you catastrophize—always imagining the worst possible outcome in any given situation—you might challenge this tendency through questions such as, “What is the likelihood that this worst-case scenario will actually come true?” and “What are some positive outcomes that are more likely to happen?”. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for GAD involves five components: Education. CBT involves learning about generalized anxiety disorder. It also teaches you how to distinguish between helpful and unhelpful worry. An increased understanding of your anxiety encourages a more accepting and proactive response to it. Monitoring. You learn to monitor your anxiety, including what triggers it, the specific things you worry about, and the severity and length of a particular episode. This helps you get perspective, as well as track your progress. Physical control strategies. CBT for GAD trains you in relaxation techniques to help decrease the physical over-arousal of the “fight or flight” response. Cognitive control strategies teach you to realistically evaluate and alter the thinking patterns that contribute to generalized anxiety disorder. As you challenge these negative thoughts, your fears will begin to subside. Behavioral strategies. Instead of avoiding situations you fear, CBT teaches you to tackle them head on. You may start by imagining the thing you’re most afraid of. By focusing on your fears without trying to avoid or escape them, you will feel more in control and less anxious. Medication for generalized anxiety disorder Medication for GAD is generally recommended only as a temporary measure to relieve symptoms at the beginning of the treatment process, with therapy the key to long-term success. There are three types of medication prescribed for generalized anxiety disorder: Buspirone – This anti-anxiety drug, known by the brand name Buspar, is generally considered to be the safest drug for generalized anxiety disorder. Although buspirone will take the edge off, it will not entirely eliminate anxiety. Benzodiazepines – These anti-anxiety drugs act very quickly (usually within 30 minutes to an hour), but physical and psychological dependence are common after more than a few weeks of use. They are generally recommended only for severe, paralyzing episodes of anxiety. Antidepressants – The relief antidepressants provide for anxiety is not immediate, and the full effect isn’t felt for up to six weeks. Some antidepressants can also exacerbate sleep problems and cause nausea. I hope this helps. Take care and have a lovely day.
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Kuch din phle mere pechan mai ek ladke ne suicide kr liya tha. Lkin reason aisa likha tha suicide note mai ki pure log ke hosh udd gaye.((use koi saya suicide krne ko bol raha tha) sir I am practical person ye baat bht presan kr rahi hame. Aisa kyu hota hai? Iska koi ilaz hai? Sir ye sub soch kr azib sa darr lgne lga hai.

BHMS
Homeopath, Secunderabad
You have to be very practical and rational. May be your friend needed some some psychological help but unfortunately could not take proper treatment. So please do not be worry about that incident. Please focus on being healthy by following healthy lifestyle. Relax you mind by doing Yoga or any exercise or follow any hobby which calms your mind and makes you feel good. You can also do some social service which will make you feel better. Helping others always benefits you and makes you a better person.
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Hi. I am 36 year working women. Since my husband's job involve lot of travelling, I had to stay alone most of the time at home. We don't have kid too. My job is also a bit complex. But I am not able to focus on my job cause of lack of pleasure/ family life. I am suffering from depression, loneliness, forgetfulness and am becoming silent in a way that I don't feel like talking, mixing with people. We both also fight a lot during weekends when we are together. I don't know how to come out of these situations. Five days job pressure and weekend goes in fighting. I feel like I am loosing interest in living.

Masters in Clinical Psychology
Psychologist, Lucknow
Hi. I am 36 year working women. Since my husband's job involve lot of travelling, I had to stay alone most of the tim...
Hi lybrate-user. Its because of depression that you are having fights and these symptoms or because of fights you are having depression. It is clear its depression and I guess you can take some psychotherapy counseling sessions to help you manage. On screening if its found that medication is must or severity of disorder is more then you can also take medication. Consult me or any psychologist for same.
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Mera 6 years ka beta hai. Jab bhi woh kisi bachhe ki company main hota hai to woh bahut differently behave karta hai. Woh unpe itna attention deta hai ki lagta hai uske as pass aur koi nahi, bohot extreme hota hai aur agar woh same chiz reciprocate nai hoti tau upset Ho jata hai. I explain to be normal as his other frnz are but Ge doesn't. How do I explain him?

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
Mera 6 years ka beta hai. Jab bhi woh kisi bachhe ki company main hota hai to woh bahut differently behave karta hai....
Hi there ~ what your child may be experiencing is a normal personality which is taking root currently. Some children are extrovert and some are introvert and this takes shape with time. Your child's behavior with other children might indicate the extroversion characteristics that your child may be having. If you believe something is abnormal however, please consult with a child psychologist. Hope this helps. Take care and have a lovely day!
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Hi, I'm 20 years old male, How to stop masturbation because of this I feel memory loss and weak in studies I cannot concentrate in anything feel like sleepy all day since past 4 years i'm doing all this and I feel pain at abdomen (kidney) side please help me any medication allopathy to stop this immediately.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
Hi, I'm 20 years old male, How to stop masturbation because of this I feel memory loss and weak in studies I cannot c...
Dear please understand masturbation is natural, normal and is never unhealthy. You cannot have memory loss, weakness in studies, feeling sleepy, pain at abdomen etc due to masturbation. I think you are having anxiety disorder due to the lack of knowledge about masturbation and obsession about the symptoms. General anxiety disorder treatment consists of cognitive behavioral therapy, life style changes, relaxation therapy and meditation. Once you learn how to manage your anxiety yourself with the help of the above treatment methods, you will be cured. The process could take some time according to the depth of the problem and the circumstances at which the patient lives. Take care.
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Sir im studying mbbs I work to hard to secure marks my frnds with less time getting good results im not bothering about others but What is lagging in me how to improve my memory, concentration levels and iq levels is there any medicine like that or any brain exercise like that please suggest me sir.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
10 Study Tips to Improve Your Learning Study Tip 1: Underlining Underlining is one of the simplest and best known study tips. It’s easy to highlight the most significant parts of what you’re reading. One key sentence per paragraph and a few important phrases here and there. You can only retain a certain amount so it’s best to retain the most important information. Study Tip 2: Make your own note and taking notes is one of the most widespread study skills out there. Essentially the aim of note-taking is to summarise lectures or articles in your own words so you can easily remember the ideas. Study Tip 3: Mind mapping A good Mind map can save you many hours of study and further consolidate your knowledge for your exams. Mind Maps are an extremely versatile tools. They can be used for brainstorming, outlining essays or study topics and for general exam preparation, ExamTime offers the ability to create Mind Maps quickly and easily which makes them the ideal tool when it comes to exams. Study Tip 4: Flash cards:- Using these are a particularly effective method of learning when trying to assimilate different facts, dates, formulas or vocabulary. Subjects such as History, Physics, Maths, Chemistry, Geography or any language are made much easier if you incorporate Flashcards in to your study. Study Tip 5: Case Studies Sometimes it can be difficult to grasp the implications of some theories. This is where studying case studies can be a big help. Case studies can help you visualise a theory and place it in a more familiar and realistic context. This is especially useful in business or law subjects. Study Tip 6: Quizzes are an excellent way to review study notes in the weeks and days before an exam. Quizzes can show where your strengths and weaknesses are, so it allows you to focus your efforts more precisely. Moreover, if you share your Study Quiz with your classmates and test each other as much as possible you can discover even more details and areas you may have overlooked. So before any exam, make sure you create and share a bunch of different Quizzes with your Friends. Study Tip 7: Brainstorming This is another study technique that is ideal for studying with friends and/or classmates. Brainstorming is a great way to expand every possible idea out of any topic. Just get a bunch of friends together and shoot the breeze, there are no wrong answers when brainstorming – just talk and capture the ideas, you can review afterward. Study Tip 8: Mnemonic Rules Mnemonics are especially useful when memorising lists and sets. Mnemonics rules basically work by associating certain concepts with other concepts that are more familiar to us. There are many different ways to make mnemonics and these can be individual to the person. Study Tip 9: ORGANISE your study One of the most effective study skills is also one of the most often overlooked; this is organising your study. Creating a TIME TABLE gives you goals and a time in which to achieve them. Having a study timetable as you study is greatly motivational Study Tip 10: Drawing Many people find it easier to recall images rather than text that is why they are better able to memorise concepts if they associate them with pictures or drawings. If you find answer helpful please click on “helpful” tab for knowing my efforts are useful Your brain is like a muscle. You need to exercise it regularly. The exciting thing is that you don’t have to be a millionaire to increase your brain capacity. All you need to do is invest a little time to regularly train your brain. So what can you do? Here are 10 simple ways you can increase your brain power and improve your intelligence! 1. Do something new When you experience something ‘new’ you actually ‘stimulate’ your brain! Don’t get stuck in a rut doing the same old things – the only way to change the structure of your brain is to do something new. This creates new neural pathways, increasing your intelligence. You could take a new route to work, try a new recipe for dinner, or even a new form of exercise – mix it up! 2. Exercise regularly It’s been proven that regular exercise helps to increase brain function and enhances neurogenesis. This means that every time you exercise you are creating new brain cells! Get off the couch and get moving! Your brain will thank you for it :) 3. Train your memory How often do you hear people say “I wish I had a better memory!’ Yet no-one does anything about this! If you discipline yourself to memorise phone numbers and other important numbers (passport, credit card, insurance, driving license) you will start to see a marked improvement in your memory 4. Be curious Instead of taking everything at face value, get into the habit of questioning everyday things/products, services that you come into contact with. By being ‘curious’ and questioning everything, you force your brain to innovate & create new ideas. Curiosity may have killed that cat, more importantly it created super important things like electricity and computers! 5. Think positive Stress & anxiety kill existing brain neurons and also stop new neurons from being created. Research has shown that positive thinking, especially in the future tense, speeds up the creation of cells and dramatically reduces stress & anxiety. Try and get a handle on negative thoughts and make an effort to replace them with positive ones. 6. Eat healthy Our diets have a HUGE impact on brain function. Our brains consume over 20% of all nutrients & oxygen that we consume – so remember to feed your brain with the good stuff! (i.e. fresh fruit and veg & plenty of OMEGA 3 oils found in oily fish) 7. Read a book Reading relieves tension & stress (brain-cell killers) because it’s a form of escapism. Research has also shown that using your imagination is a great way to train your brain because you force your mind to ‘picture’ what you are imagining. Reading is a great way to trigger your imagination! 8. Get enough sleep Sleep is like a mini detox for the brain. This is when your body regenerates cells and removes all the toxins that have built up during the day. Get to bed between the hours of 9pm and midnight to benefit from the most effective hours of sleep! 9. Ditch the GPS Gone are the days of map reading! Sat Nav may have made our lives easier, it has also made our brains lazier and less efficient at the same time! Go back to the old school and use a map to navigate every now and then (this exercises the part of your brain responsible for understanding spatial relationships). 10. Ban the calculator Remember back at school when we were taught to use our brains to do simple sums like times tables?! It’s incredible how we now rely on devices like smart-phones and laptops to calculate really simple equations. Resist the urge to work things out using an external device – and use the device you were born with – your brain!
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I am suffering from great fear of death and aging causing anxiety insonomia and angity. I am taking mirtazapine 7.5 and esclitopramplus .I am feeling good. But when I discontinue it again feeling fear. Doctor has told me you r suffering from OCD/GAD. Please suggest me best homeopathy medicine or ayurvedic medicine. I am doing yoga and sudarshan Kriya on daily basis.

B.A. Psychology, M.A. Psychology, Ph. D - Psychology
Psychologist, Delhi
I am suffering from great fear of death and aging causing anxiety insonomia and angity. I am taking mirtazapine 7.5 a...
You may continue taking the prescribed medicines, but I think time you realised that medicine is giving you only interim relief, the moment you stop taking medicine, you begin to feel uncomfortable. Our physical reactions are not only controlled physiologically but are impacted by our thought process. I recommend that you meet a psychologist and work on your feelings and thoughts- unless you challenge the irrationality of your fears and your thoughts, you will continue having these difficulties. Eventually you will land up taking higher doses of the medicines to calm yourself. Yoga and sudharshan kriya are good ways of relaxation but you will require cognitive behaviour therapy (cbt), or some other form of psychotherapy as a permanent solution to your fears.
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My elder sister (30) has a personality disorder, mental depression since 8 years, she is on medicine since 2 years, but not enough improvement noted. She don't want to talk to any family member, she has no desire to marry. She don't want to marry without any reason, she always feel depressed. We went to a psychiatrist and he prescribed antidepressants as fluvoxin, clonazepam, olanzapine etc and is being given since 2 yrs, but not enough cure noted. She lives like saint, she has no interest in society, no sexual need, no care of family, major depressed. Sir/Mam pls do suggest what to do? We are in much problem, is the medications are wrong? Pls Reply.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
My elder sister (30) has a personality disorder, mental depression since 8 years, she is on medicine since 2 years, b...
Hi there ~ I am glad that you asked this question. Although this is an open forum and there would be limits to confidentiality that would be breached if I would answer your question fully, I will give you some information regarding the depressive disorder. I am however unable to prescribe medications or give you specific advice regarding counseling or therapy in your situation as it would be considered confidential and private. In that case I recommend that you book an online appointment after you review my profile on this website. Sadness or downswings in mood are normal reactions to life’s struggles, setbacks, and disappointments. Many people use the word “depression” to explain these kinds of feelings, but depression is much more than just sadness. Some people describe depression as “living in a black hole” or having a feeling of impending doom. However, some depressed people don't feel sad at all—they may feel lifeless, empty, and apathetic, or men in particular may even feel angry, aggressive, and restless. Whatever the symptoms, depression is different from normal sadness in that it engulfs your day-to-day life, interfering with your ability to work, study, eat, sleep, and have fun. The feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and worthlessness are intense and unrelenting, with little, if any, relief. Are you depressed? If you identify with several of the following signs and symptoms—especially the first two—and they just won’t go away, you may be suffering from depression. You feel hopeless and helpless You’ve lost interest in friends, activities, and things you used to enjoy You feel tired all the time Your sleep and appetite has changed You can’t concentrate or find that previously easy tasks are now difficult You can’t control your negative thoughts, no matter how much you try You are much more irritable, short-tempered, or aggressive than usual You’re consuming more alcohol than normal or engaging in other reckless behavior What are the signs and symptoms of depression? Depression varies from person to person, but there are some common signs and symptoms. It’s important to remember that these symptoms can be part of life’s normal lows. But the more symptoms you have, the stronger they are, and the longer they’ve lasted—the more likely it is that you’re dealing with depression. When these symptoms are overwhelming and disabling, that's when it's time to seek help. Signs and symptoms of depression include: Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness. A bleak outlook—nothing will ever get better and there’s nothing you can do to improve your situation. Loss of interest in daily activities. No interest in former hobbies, pastimes, social activities, or sex. You’ve lost your ability to feel joy and pleasure. Appetite or weight changes. Significant weight loss or weight gain—a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month. Sleep changes. Either insomnia, especially waking in the early hours of the morning, or oversleeping (also known as hypersomnia). Anger or irritability. Feeling agitated, restless, or even violent. Your tolerance level is low, your temper short, and everything and everyone gets on your nerves. Loss of energy. Feeling fatigued, sluggish, and physically drained. Your whole body may feel heavy, and even small tasks are exhausting or take longer to complete. Self-loathing. Strong feelings of worthlessness or guilt. You harshly criticize yourself for perceived faults and mistakes. Reckless behavior. You engage in escapist behavior such as substance abuse, compulsive gambling, reckless driving, or dangerous sports. Concentration problems. Trouble focusing, making decisions, or remembering things. Unexplained aches and pains. An increase in physical complaints such as headaches, back pain, aching muscles, and stomach pain. I hope this helps. Take care and have a lovely day!
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