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Dr. Praveen Agarwal

Endocrinologist, Chennai

400 at clinic
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Dr. Praveen Agarwal Endocrinologist, Chennai
400 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. Praveen Agarwal
Dr. Praveen Agarwal is a trusted Endocrinologist in Mandaveli, Chennai. He is currently associated with Sri Ranga Nursing Home in Mandaveli, Chennai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Praveen Agarwal on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Endocrinologists in India. You will find Endocrinologists with more than 39 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Endocrinologists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Sri Ranga Nursing Home

#4/13, Devanathan Street, Mandaveli. Landmark: Opp. To RTO Office, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
400 at clinic
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My mother's age is 40 years and I hv a diabetes. I have checked my sugar level and found 277 before meal and 573. How she overcome it.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
My mother's age is 40 years and I hv a diabetes. I have checked my sugar level and found 277 before meal and 573. How...
We need to control sugar levels with medication exercise and following a diabetic diet and we have to examine her for medication
1 person found this helpful
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My mother in law aging 73 years has bp and diabetes since very long and has been taking medicine regularly for the same. Last week, she started feeling weak and cramps in legs. 8 days ago, she consulted a physician for the same, e checked the bp and it was 238/110. The doctor has given lasix inj immediately and advised to take lots of fluids and there will be frequent urination after the injection. Within 1.5 hrs of taking that injection she started vomiting. It continued for a day and she became very weak though we have been giving her electoral regularly. Her bp was fluctuating from 190 to 220 for 2 days and she collapsed on 3rd day having seizures. We have taken her to the hospital immediately and the next day it was diagnosed as PRES. Sodium levels were dropped to 97. So the have given sodium for 2 days. She is in ICU now, are the vitals are showing good but still she did not get consciousness. She is able to open her eyes from last 2 days but not looking straight at us neither recognizing or responding to anyone. Doctors are saying it will take time to recover but till now there are no signs of improvement what should we do? What is the general recovery time for this case. What are the improvements we can expect and the timelines? what are the other impacts post recovery? please advise, Thanks a lot!

MBBS
General Physician, Delhi
My mother in law aging 73 years has bp and diabetes since very long and has been taking medicine regularly for the sa...
Hi. Need to understand the sequence of events and her investigation reports especially ct head to advise. Please feel free to consult.
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Please suggest. Is there any case in India whose diabetes is cured completely. If yes then approx how many cases there are. Is it really so difficult to find the cure of diabetes with such technologies.

MD - General Medicine, DM - Endocrinology, MBBS
Endocrinologist, Delhi
Please suggest. Is there any case in India whose diabetes is cured completely. If yes then approx how many cases ther...
Diabetes is disease of lifestyle. It can't be cured but only controlled. There are lakhs of people who controlled their diabetes without medicines. It can be kept under control for years. But it usually happens only in those who have mild diabetes.
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My uncle 60 years of age suffering from diabetic ulcer (leg) and it's in advanced stage. We need some experienced surgeon/nurse for daily dressing the wound at home. Please help.

MBBS, CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology, Diploma in Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics, Cetificate Course In Thyroid Disorders Management (CCMTD)
Endocrinologist, Hubli-Dharwad
My uncle 60 years of age suffering from diabetic ulcer (leg) and it's in advanced stage. We need some experienced sur...
Mr. lybrate-user, Thanks for the query. In your info there is no mention of the place where you are staying (town/city). It is best to visit any experienced surgeon or surgical hospital for initial treatment. Bets is to consult a Diabeteic Foot specialist in the aera. Later based on his advice further treatment should be carried out. First and foremost is to achieve a strict blood glucose control, otherwise healing becomes a problem. Plus proper debridment is also needed. Thanks.
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Diabetes - The rising epidemic

MBBS, DNB, Diploma Dyslipidemia, CCEBDM, CCMTD
General Physician, Gurgaon
Diabetes - The rising epidemic

India is now in the midst of a diabetes epidemic, with an adult prevalence rate of nine per cent and almost 69 million people living with diabetes. In another 15 years, the figure is expected to rise to 101 million. In all this, more than 90 percent of cases are lifestyle-induced.

Individuals with diabetes do not have any symptoms for long periods of time and may have complications at the time of diagnosis. Common examples such as retinopathy (blindness), nephropathy (kidney disease), neuropathy (nerve damage) and diabetic foot (gangrene and amputations in extreme cases) affect a large proportion of individuals with diabetes. Approximately a third of those with diabetes are known to develop retinopathy. Diabetes is also known to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (heart attack and stroke); nearly half of those with diabetes die of heart attack.

A bad lifestyle is what propels this epidemic while an inadequate response from the health system results in debilitating complications. The staggering increase in cases of diabetics and prediabetics has been attributed to lifestyle changes as a result of rapid and unplanned urbanisation, an ageing population, a sedentary lifestyle and increasing consumption of unhealthy food, especially modern processed foods. Lack of opportunistic screening delays diagnosis while poor access to care and medicines, information asymmetry between doctors and patients, and a paucity of well-trained human resource, impede evidence-based management of diabetes.

Health promotion strategies

Prevention remains central in halting the current pace of the diabetes epidemic. Our focus should be on both individual and policy-level interventions. Health promotion strategies should be aimed at maintaining normal body weight by improving physical activity and following a balanced and healthy diet. Evidence from the [INTERNATIONAL] Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) shows that small reductions in weight by the moderate-intensity activity of at least 150 minutes per week and reduced fat consumption on most days prevented progression to diabetes by 58 percent among those with prediabetes.

In general, brisk walking for at least 30 minutes a day and following a healthy diet every day which has at least 3-5 servings of locally available and inexpensive fruits and vegetables, and less refined sugar and saturated fat can prevent or postpone the occurrence of diabetes. Doing yoga may also help prevent diabetes; in individuals with diabetes, it may even help them have better control of blood sugar. In addition, every adult above 30 years should be screened for diabetes and hypertension during a planned or unplanned visit to a physician or hospital.

Policy measures also call for reinforcement of health systems. Higher taxation on sugar-sweetened beverages and high-fat junk foods and planning urban infrastructure to promote physical activity have become all the more imperative now.

Diabetes is no longer a disease predominantly affecting the rich and is fast spreading to rural communities. The poor are even more vulnerable. Thus, India has a population where the number of people with diabetes has increased substantially over time and is set to continuously grow; a large number of people disabled by complications, and an equivalent number who are unaware of the condition.

Early diagnosis and prevention is the key to controlling the disease and minimise the risk of disability. In this, we need a multi-pronged approach that involves collaboration among national leaders, clinicians, public health researchers and allied health professionals.

8 people found this helpful

I have thyroid problem, my TSH is 16.91 and T4 is 4.81. Please suggest me. Even I am taking medicine thyrox-50mg regularly. Suggest me diet also.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine Specialist, Faridabad
I have thyroid problem, my TSH is 16.91 and T4 is 4.81. Please suggest me. Even I am taking medicine thyrox-50mg regu...
tsh is 16.91...you can take tab. thyrox -150mcg before meal before meal. You can take Nutrient-rich foods that improve your health may also benefit your thyroid gland, antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables more plenty of water: Blueberries, tomatoes, bell peppers, and other foods rich in antioxidants can improve overall health and benefit the thyroid gland. Eating foods high in B vitamins, like whole grains, may also help. Selenium: Tiny amounts of selenium are needed for enzymes that make thyroid hormones to work properly. Eating selenium-rich foods, such as sunflower seeds or Brazil nuts, can be beneficial. Tyrosine: This amino acid is used by the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4. Taking a supplement may help,
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What are the main symptoms of thyroid? Please tell me. Also tell what are its precautions. Thanks.

MBBS, CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology
Endocrinologist, Hubli-Dharwad
Mr Vadansh, Thyroid is a gland present in all of us it oes not cause any symptoms, it only produces hormone thyroxine essential for development and functioning of brain. It is also required for all the important metabolic functions in the body.
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Suffering from diabetes & bp Becoming weaker day by day How can he become healthy.

M.Sc - Psychology, MBA (Healthcare)
General Physician, Kangra
Suffering from diabetes & bp
Becoming weaker day by day How can he become healthy.
You should start exercising daily, eat healthy diet without skipping meals, avoid oily and junk food, drink lots of water and juices. Eat 5 meals a day consist of three regular meals and two healthy snacks, or 5 small meals. Quit coffee. All these measure to be taken along with medicine
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What causes hashimoto thyroiditis and. What is he best method of treatment? Can iodine helps this condition?

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder in which the immune system turns against the body's own tissues. In people with hashimoto's, the immune system attacks the thyroid. This can lead to hypothyroidism, a condition in which the thyroid does not make enough hormones for the body's needs. There is no cure for hashimoto's, but replacing hormones with medication can regulate hormone levels and restore your normal metabolism. Yes, iodine may help.
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