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Dr. Mahesh

MD(Paed.).,DM(Neuro)

Neurologist, Chennai

15 Years Experience  ·  400 at clinic
Dr. Mahesh MD(Paed.).,DM(Neuro) Neurologist, Chennai
15 Years Experience  ·  400 at clinic
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Personal Statement

Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one. Doctor is an active member of IAN
More about Dr. Mahesh
Dr. Mahesh is a trusted Neurologist in Mambalam, Chennai. He has had many happy patients in his 15 years of journey as a Neurologist. He has done MD(Paed.).,DM(Neuro) . You can meet Dr. Mahesh personally at Mahesh Neuro Centre in Mambalam, Chennai. Book an appointment online with Dr. Mahesh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
MD(Paed.).,DM(Neuro) - madras medical college - 2002
Languages spoken
English
Professional Memberships
IAN

Location

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40, South Usman Road, T Nagar,Chennai Get Directions
400 at clinic
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MD PULMONARY, DTCD
Pulmonologist, Faridabad
HEADACHE
Headache is one of the 10 most disabling conditions overall.Over all types of headache 47% are due to migraine and tention type of headache.The prevalence of migraine headaches ranges from 8.4% to 18%.In addition to individual morbidity ,it results in great cost to society.Migraine is more prevelent in female and tention type headache is evenly distributted among both male and female.
Migraine is initialy episodic ,occuring 2 or lesstime/weak.It usualy disturb daily activities of patient and may progress to chronic migraine. Tention type of headache does not disturb daily routine of patient.Poor socioeconomic status,education,female gender,less sleep,anxiety and depression may transform episodic migraine to chronic migraine.
Sudden onset bursting headache is bad and one should consult the doctor immediatly
Overuse of pain killels can also cause headache
2 people found this helpful

Pain in back from last 5-6months. Numbness. L1-S1 dislocation of disc. Medication: Gabapin400 & tizan Doctor has recommended me for'root block sleeve so should I go for this or not? If yes then is there any further complications or side effects in future? Otherwise what should I do?

Master Of Surgery, DNB (Orthopedics)
Orthopedist, Agra
Pain in back from last 5-6months. Numbness. L1-S1 dislocation of disc. Medication: Gabapin400 & tizan Doctor has reco...
If pain is not improving and numbness increasing, surgery may help, but if you want non surgical treatment try at least for 3 months before resorting to any other treatment.
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Is Sleep Paralysis a Symptom of a Serious Problem? Yesterday left side full not sense (top to bottom like head, hand and leg) this is 1st time happening to me.

MBBS, Master In Health Science
Neurologist, Mumbai
Usually sleep paralysis affects the entire body and is part of narcolepsy which includes cataplexy (neck quickly losing power e.f. While Laughing) and excessive daytime sleepiness. Since your episode was so asymmetric you should be very intensively evaluated to rule out a transient loss of blood supply to one part of your brain (a transient ischaemic attack or TIA)
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I am suffering from brain migraine related disease condition I am suffering from severe head ache in left or right brain so can you suggest me a best treatment.

DNB Neurology JHRC, MD Med, MBBS
Neurologist, Mumbai
Plenty of oral fluids, meals at right time, adequate sleep, avoid late nights. If doesn't work see local neurologist.
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Neuroplasticity - 7 Things You Must Know About it!

MCh - Neurosurgery, MBBS
Neurosurgeon, Chennai
Neuroplasticity - 7 Things You Must Know About it!

The neurones in the brain are constantly reorganising their connections both functionally and physically according to the environment, your thinking and behaviour. This ability is known as neuroplasticity. Through neuroplasticity the nerve cells of brain can compensate for injury to some parts of the brain and enable a person to recover from stroke, birth abnormalities. It is also beneficial in treating autism, ADD, learning disabilities and helps manage obsessive compulsive disorders.

Here are seven things you should know about neuroplasticity.

  1. Change depends on the attentiveness of the brain: Neuroplasticity changes can only happen if the brain is alert and active. When the brain is active it releases neurochemicals that are necessary for the neurone connections to change. If a person is distracted to inattentive, these changes cannot happen.
  2. The more the effort; the bigger the change: Neuroplasticity changes depend on how motivated the person is to change or learn new tasks. For this reason, when it comes to using neuroplasticity for physiotherapy, it is essential to first deal with any depression or anxiety issues the patient might be having before attempting to rehabilitate them.
  3. It helps strengthen neural connections: Repetition of actions is one of the key elements of neuroplasticity in physiotherapy. Through this, the strength of neurone connections is strengthened to include sensory information, movement and cognitive patterns.
  4. It improves cell to cell connections: This is crucial to a patient’s rehabilitation as it increases reliability and makes a person more independent. In turn, this makes behaviour patterns more reliable.
  5. It helps predict actions: A task can usually be broken down into a series of smaller tasks. For example, feeding oneself can be broken down into steps that begin with lifting a spoon and filling it with food to finally putting the spoon into your mouth. Hence, along with completing an action, the brain must also know what to do next. Neuroplasticity helps improve this associative flow and allows the brain to predict the next step.
  6. Changes can be temporary or permanent: Initial changes due to neuroplasticity are temporary ad only if the brain determines the experience to be desired is this change made permanent. This is why when treating mobility issues, patients are not always able to repeat tasks in the same way.
  7. Memory guides the learning: When making new neural connections through neuroplasticity, the brain is taught to discard unsuccessful attempts and only remember the experience of the successful attempts. From here, adjustments are made to improve the connection. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a neurosurgeon.
3 people found this helpful

I am 28 year old and suffered from migraine. So how can I get rid of it. Please help me and suggest.

BAMS, MD Ayurveda
Sexologist, Lonavala
If there is a burning sensation with you migraine headache, apply a paste of ground clay or sandalwood powder mixed with rose water. In case of migraine headache due to inflamed sinuses, inhale steam with vinegar added to the water. Mix ¼ teaspoon of clove powder with 1 teaspoon of cinnamon oil. Apply this paste on the affected area for 20-30 minutes.
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I am a 30 year old woman and have migraine for last 7 year. Before six years back I took treatment but some reason I leave it in middle. But again I have frequently headache for last 4 months. What should I do?

MBBS
General Physician, Delhi
In case of acute pain take tablet brufen twice daily with tablet rantac empty stomach for 3 days. If symptoms persist take tablet rizatriptan sos only once in 24 hrs period not more than that. Take tablet beta cap plus once daily night time for 3 months. Avoid precipitating factors like tension, stress, direct sunlight exposure, excessive work load, literally anything can precipitate migraine.
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I am suffering from migraine from 2009. Sometimes the pain is very severe and unbearable. Please help me out with a permanent cure for it.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
Migraine treatment includes 1) treatment of acute attacks of headache 2) Treatment for prevention of future attacks 3) Treatment of precipitating factors like sleep problems. stress, anxiety, depression, hormonal imbalance etc With a holistic treatment you can avoid relapses and migraine attacks can be kept under control. However you need to provide me with a complete history of your headache patterns and treatment taken so far. Consult me online for a complete treatment plan
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I am 36 year old I have numbness in my both hand please suggest me some ayurvedic medicine I have cervical problem also thanks.

BHMS
Homeopath, Delhi
I am 36 year old I have numbness in my both hand please suggest me some ayurvedic medicine I have cervical problem al...
Hello, you can take homoeopathic medicines1. Calc fluor 30 (4 drops in little water) every morning empty stomach only one dose in a day for a week. 2. Rhus tox 30 (4 drops in little water) thrice a day for a week and update. *use a small pillow. *don't put hands under the head while sleeping.
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My mom was affected with SAH and later got affected by vasospasm. Right side is paralysed. Latest CT report shows that there is a hydrocephalus formation. Doctor is advising for a surgery. My Question is that we do not have a reclining bed at home and we are giving food through a rayls tube and she is always lying down even when we are feeding her. Does this affect in any way?

PGD Maternal Child Health, MBBS
General Physician, Akola
Hydrocephalus may need a shunt procedure to keep intracranial pressure normal. Continuously in bed may cause bed sores and bladder infection if regular posture changing is not attended. If her bladder is catheterized, outer urine bag emptying should be done properly so that urine from bag does not return through catheter in to the urinary bladder. Apply talcum powder to the back and keep the skin dry, especially in these days of summer.
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My hands and legs are becoming numb this days when I sit down or hold any thing heavy.

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellow In Joint Replacement , Fellow In Arthroscopy
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
My hands and legs are becoming numb this days when I sit down or hold any thing heavy.
Good morning lybrate-user, pain_& numbness in hand & legs at age of 21 is not a good sign, either your severely malnourished or you have some neurological problem, you need evaluation dear.
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I am suffering from bell's palsy from 2 days. I am also taking treatment of allopathy. Should l take help of physiotherapy? What can I do prevent my eye from dryness? How much time it take to be normal.

MBBS, cc USG
General Physician, Gurgaon
You should take help of good Physiotherapist Eye care is very imp some drop are available to prevent dryness, consult Eye doctor for this
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Doctor when I fall on bed for sleeping. I feel like a heaviness or numbness in my right rib below portion. N then I feel some type of gas is forming. After that I get regular pops I don't know why. Bt gas form every 1 min. What is the reason for that. N how can I naturally treat that?

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Doctor when I fall on bed for sleeping. I feel like a heaviness or numbness in my right rib below portion. N then I f...
Eat a high-fiber diet. Get insoluble and soluble fiber. Limit foods that are high in fat. Choose lean meats. Incorporate probiotics into your diet. Eat on schedule. Stay hydrated.
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Hi, I have one problem. i was shivered at fear and when I carry some weights even to take selfie with mobile on that time my hand was shivering i'm not alcoholic. But everyday i faced this problem. If i get fear and scary moments the problem will be high. What is the problem of that. please tell me solution.

MBBS, DPM
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
Hi, I have one problem. i was shivered at fear and when I carry some weights even to take selfie with mobile on that ...
Dear Seshuk, Shivering may be due to anxiety, or due to thyroid problem or due to some drugs you use or smoking or other neurological causes. Please don't avoid taking selfie or other scary moments. If you continue, the fear and shivering will be reduced. However consult a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.
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I have migraines from last Once a month. Up late, menstrual, food disturbances but before three months i took multivitamins for a month. what should i do ? please advice

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
I have migraines from last  Once a month.  Up late, menstrual, food disturbances but before three months i took multi...
Migrane- It is characterised by one sided headache which is pulsatile in nature and with a throbbing pain usually with an aura and we can take tablet propranolol after personal examination
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I am 61 years old and retired from Govt. Deptt. And my question is that my both hands are shivering and I have consult two hospital/doctors and they are saying that my nervous systems problem. One doctors had told me that it is heridited problem. What I can do please advice me?

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), modern diagnostics
Ayurveda,
I am 61 years old and retired from Govt. Deptt. And my question is that my both hands are shivering and I have consul...
Kampa vata or kind of parkinsons disease at old age is seen in many. Ayurveda therapies like abhyamga shirovasti pizhichil etc may be of good help for reducing the shivering.
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Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

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