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Dr. Magesh

Neurologist, Chennai

Dr. Magesh Neurologist, Chennai
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Magesh
Dr. Magesh is a renowned Neurologist in West Mambalam, Chennai. Doctor is currently associated with Sri Meenakshi Nursing Home in West Mambalam, Chennai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Magesh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Neurologists in India. You will find Neurologists with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurologists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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No 3-A, Baroda Street, West Mambalam. Landmark: Near Jains School & Near Pothys, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
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W 564, Opp Shiva Vishnu Temple, Park Road Anna Nagar West Extention, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
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I am from Mumbai .I'm suffering from migraine since last 2 or 3 months .Dr. Please Can you make me sure that what is the treatment for this?

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
Migraine is a kind of relapsing headache. Its symptoms include - episodic unilateral or bilateral, severe and pulsating headaches, associated at times with nausea and vomiting, relieved momentarily on rest or taking medications and aggravated by precipitating factors. The treatment of migraine is mainly done for relief from acute headache attacks and later treatments to prevent future relapses. Also treatment of factors which tend to cause relapses is also important. Consult a headache specialist for a composite and complete treatment. You may contact me online for further queries and assistance in treatment in this regard.
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I am a male, aged 66 years. For the last two-three days I am having a strange feeling in the left part of my left foot. When I touch my foot, a portion of it feels numbness or a lack of touch feeling. It was more severe in the beginning but now slowly this feeling has decreased to some extent. Can you throw some light on this phenomena why it has happened or possible reason thereof.

MD-Ayurveda, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Sexologist, Haldwani
I am a male, aged 66 years. For the last two-three days I am having a strange feeling in the left part of my left foo...
Hello- This is due to the deformity of Sciatic nerve which causes numbness,tingling or pain in the foot. Try this treatment to get relief- 1)Ashwagandharistha 2 tsp twice daily. 2)Tab panchamrit loha guggulu 1 tab twice daily.
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Can't Sleep? Here are natural home remedies for Insomnia

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition, DNHE, P.G. Diploma in Panchkarma, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Hapur
Can't Sleep? Here are natural home remedies for Insomnia
Can't Sleep??? Here are natural home remedies for Insomnia


Insomnia can become a real nightmare as the clock ticks on into the night and you ’re awake to notice. Try these natural approaches to help you get some rest

Before- bed bites

• Have a slice of turkey or chicken , or a banana before heading to bed . These foods contain tryptophan , an amino acid that ’s used to make serotonin . And serotonin is a brain chemical that helps you sleep .
• Carbohydrates help trytophan enter the brain. Try a glass of warm milk (milk contains tryptophan ) and a cookie , or warm milk with a spoonful of honey .
• Avoid big meals late in the evening. You need three to four hours to digest a big meal.
• Spicy or sugary food, even at suppertime , is usually a bad idea. Spices can irritate your stomach , and when it tosses and turns, so will you . Having a lot of sugary food—especially chocolate, which contains caffeine— can make you feel jumpy .

Call on herbs for help

• Valerian helps people fall asleep faster without the “ hangover ” affect of some sleeping pills. It binds to the same receptors in the brain that tranquilizers such as diazepam bind to . Take two capsules of valerian root an hour before bed .
• Take 4 , 000 to 8, 000 milligrams of dried passionflower capsules . Passionflower is widely used as a mild herbal sedative .

Smell your way to sleep

• Lavender has a reputation as a mild tranquilizer . Simply dab a bit of the oil onto your temples and forehead before you hit the pillow . The aroma should help send you off to sleep .
• Put a drop of jasmine essential oil on each wrist just before you go to bed . In studies conducted at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia, researchers discovered that
people who spent the night in jasmine -scented rooms slept more peacefully than people who stayed in unscented—or even lavender-scented— rooms .
• Try a soothing aromatic bath before bedtime. Add 5 drops lavender oil and 3 drops ylang- ylang oil to warm bathwater and enjoy a nice soak .

Be a slave to schedule

• Wake up at the same time each day, no matter how little sleep you got the night before. On weekends, follow the same schedule, so your body adheres to the same pattern all week long . You ’ll fall asleep faster.
• Every morning , go for a walk . It doesn ’t have to be a long walk, but it should definitely be outdoors. The presence of natural light (even if the day is overcast ) tells your groggy body it’ s time to wake up for the day. With your body clock set by the great outdoors, you ’ll sleep better at night .
• Try not to nap during the day, no matter how tired you feel. People who don’ t have insomnia often benefit from a short afternoon nap. However , if you ’ re napping in daytime only to turn into a wide -eyed zombie at night , there’ s a good chance that that afternoon snooze is disrupting your body clock.

Pillow tricks

• Once you get into bed , imagine your feet becoming heavy and numb . Feel them sinking into the mattress . Then do the same with your calves, and slowly work your way up your body, letting it all grow heavy and relaxed . The idea is to let yourself go, in gradual phases .
• If you’ re still awake after this progressive relaxation exercise, count sheep . The point is to occupy your mind with boring repetition , and , not to cast aspersions on sheep , there’ s nothing more boring or repetitive than counting a herd of them . Any repetitive counting activity will lull you .
• If you just can’t sleep , don’ t lie in bed worrying about it. That will only make sleep harder to attain. Get up, leave the bedroom , and grab a book or watch TV .

Prep your bedroom

• Turn your alarm clock so that you can’t see it from bed . If you ’ re glancing at the clock when you wake up— and it’s almost impossible not to —you ’ ll soon start wondering how you can function tomorrow on so little sleep tonight .
• Turn your thermostat down a few degrees before heading to bed . Most people sleep better when their surroundings are cool.
• If you share your bed , consider buying a queen - or king- size mattress so you don ’t keep one another up. Or consider sleeping in separate beds . ( Be sure to emphasize that your wish for separate beds is based on pragmatism rather than preference . )

Check the label

• Be cautious about taking an over - the -counter painkiller before bed . Some of them, like Excedrin , contain caffeine . Read the label first.
• Check labels of decongestants and cold remedies too. In addition to caffeine, they may contain ingredients , such as pseudoephedrine, that rev up your nervous system and leave you unable to fall asleep.

More " don ’ ts" for better dozing

• Avoid exercising within four hours of bedtime— it’s too stimulating. Instead , exercise in the morning or after work . An exception is yoga . A number of yoga postures are designed to calm your body and prepare you for sleep.
• Avoid caffeinated beverages, particularly within four hours of bedtime. Though people have varying ranges of sensitivity to caffeine, the stimulating effects can be long - lasting .
• Also avoid alcohol in the evenings. While a glass of sherry might help you fall asleep a bit faster than usual, the effects soon wear off , and you’ re more likely to wake up during the night.
• If you smoke within four hours of your bedtime, look no further for the cause of your insomnia . Nicotine stimulates the central nervous system, interfering with your body fall asleep and stay that way .
37 people found this helpful

I am 21 year old female I have migraine problem for last 1and half year and my treatment is going on from p. G. I. Is there any permanent solution for this problem?

M.B.B.S., D.M.C.H.
General Physician, Alwar
There is no permanent cure. Avoid anxiety. You can take t. Vasograin 1 stat, whenever you feel that you are going to develop headache.
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My half face have paralysis. I do lot of thing for treatment. BT I ntng find. Any medicine. What I do.

MSc in Orhopedic Physiotherapy (UK), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Bangalore
Often, no treatment is needed for facial palsy. Symptoms often begin to improve right away. However, it may take weeks or even months for the muscles to get stronger. You can try physiotherapy treatment to help progress their recovery. Physiotherapy treatment for facial palsy may consist of facial massage, exercises, and electrical stimulation. Most cases go away completely within a few weeks to months. If you did not lose all of your nerve function and symptoms began to improve within 3 weeks, you're more likely to regain all or most of the strength in your facial muscles. Best wishes.
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I am 20 yr old male. My body shakes every time, especially when I do some hard physical work like exercise etc, I hand shakes badly when I hold something in my hand. Please help me.

DM - Neurology
Neurologist, Hyderabad
It is a kind of tremor disorder. Is there any other family member or blood relative having these kind of symptoms. You should check for thyroid function. A video of your hand shaking along with other detail information is required to give a full diagnosis. After that medications can be prescribed you to reduce your tremor.
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I am regularly suffering from migraine. Can you any one please telma the solutions or remedies for this. Please.

MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Aurangabad
Yes migraine headache can be cured by homeopathy take natrum mur 30 30 ml liquid sbl 1 drop daily on tongue for x 7 days and revert me back you may contact me on this site. And check my package and get customized medicines.
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Sir, I am a ret med. Spe. My wife is suffering from parkinsonism since last 6-7 yrs but since last one yrs her condition is deteriorating pertaing to muscle loss. Loss of memory, unable to talk & respond properly. Shedevloped hypoprotenaemia due to bedsore etc & I gave her uman albumin 20%. Kindly advice any thing to be done at this stage to boost up her muscle power. Thanks.

MPTh/MPT
Physiotherapist,
Dear friend. Kindly find out brain auditary evoked potentials. This will help to report the performance of memory power, muscles power, speech etc. Consult neuro physiotherapist nearest your location also. This will be helpful
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How long the affected hand of a right side paralysed person generally takes to function if he is under proper medication and physiotherapy. Now the hand is stretching and folding but remains folded at times of walking. He is not able to hold things in this hand. PL SUGGEST. Is there any allopathy medicine to make this functional. PL HELP.

FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Only rehabilitation exercises from physiotherapist would help along with proper follow up with neuro physican best wishes.
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I usually take 5mg clonazepam tab but today I take 10mg is that any problem can create?

MBBS
General Physician, Kolar
Can you please give more details as to four what you're talking clonazepam. It is usually not advisable to increase dosages of such drugs like clonazepam as they have an impact on your brain. Whether you're taking it for seizures or as an anti-anxiety drug you should never alter the dose without your doctors advice. Please consult your doctor who prescribed the medicine. If it is a single isolated incident I guess it's all right. But my sincere request and advice to you is to not repeat it.
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I am 76 old and having backache and nummness (jhannjanahat) in the right arm and vertigo and taking medicine kalmia and lachlenthis.

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
It could be due to cervical spondylosis this is quite a common condition rule out diabetes & vit. D deficiency or any other metabolic disorder. Sleep on a hard bed with soft bedding on it. Use no pillow under the head. Any way take caldikind plus (mankind) 1tab odx10days paracetamol 250mg od & sos x 5days do neck & back (spine) exercises contact me again if need be. Use of cervical collar will give you relief. Make sure you are not allergic to any of the medicines you are going to take.
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I have migraine in my head sometimes and I feel Vomit the same time so can you please Advise me to what should I do that time?

BHMS
Homeopath, Thane
I have migraine in my head sometimes and I feel Vomit the same time so can you please Advise me to what should I do t...
Hi, take following medicines nat suph 30 4pills to be sucked thrice a day for 15 days kali bich 200 4pills to be sucked thrice a day for 15 days take plain water steam once a day avoid eating curd, icecreams, pickles, papad, citrus fruits, watermelon, green skin bananas, pineapple, strawberries, custard apple, guavas. Stop using mosquito repellants. As these are the causes which worsen the headche.
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I am 19 years old. My blood pressure is also normal but my fingers are vibrating. Normally they don't vibrate but when I open my palm they start vibrating. please give me suggestion about this.

BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Bangalore
I am 19 years old. My blood pressure is also normal but my fingers are vibrating. Normally they don't vibrate but whe...
Following could be the causes: * tingling (vibration) can be caused by a disorder of the neck spine, disorders of the elbow, wrist, hand or the fingers itself. The other causes may include: *overuse of the wrist * constant or repeating leaning on the wrist: (cyclists, crutches users, weight lifters.) * hypoglycemia can cause shaking/shivering hands - check on your sugar levels * hypothyroidism could cause vibration in hands/fingers * too much caffeine can make your hands shake - caffeine is present in coffee, tea and soft drinks. * do not skip meals - not having your meal on time or starving, fasting leads to shivering. Note: do not delay and consult your doctor to diagnose the problem. Your doctor will discuss your medical history and general health. He may also ask about your work, your activities, and what medications you are taking. Regards!
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Please suggest the Cure for parkinson s disease in early stage.I am 48years old male from mumbai.

MD - Alternate Medicine, BHMS
Homeopath, Surat
Please have homoeopathic treatment. It will help you a lot instead of starting dopamine. Have homoeopathic medicines.
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Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

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Dear Dr. , My son 12 year old in 7th standard was suffering from Epilepsy in his early years. After completing his course of 4 years of Epilepsy , he is absolutely fine from last 7 years after leaving the medicine. At present he is complaining of severe headache from last 3 or 4 days. We have consulted MBBS Doctor and he has given some medicine for this temporary phase. My question is that " Is this headache is related to that Epilepsy " What we should do. EEG is required or this may be another reason. Regards,

MBBS
Psychiatrist, Delhi
Dear Dr. ,
My son 12 year old in 7th standard was suffering from Epilepsy in his early years. After completing his co...
Hi there, Headache is something caused by over 30 reasons ranging from diminution of vision or ear related problem to simple stress.... The list may include a form of epilepsy but seems unlikely unless we can rule out more obvious and common causes for this problem.. I believe EEG is not the investigation needed at this point.... Rather going for eye testing be the first step in this.... More over a detailed history is very essential in ruling out most of the likely causes... Feel free to connect further... Plz take care.
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I am having severe pain in my left cheek only when am in A/C or cold. I can not able to sit properly at work due to this pain. I am a patient of diabetic and a seizure. please suggest me some advice I want instant relief. Can this be relief by a pain killer.

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Neurology
Neurologist, Hyderabad
Your symptoms could be suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia. Proper evaluation can help us to find the cause. It can be treated with medications.
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I have headache continuously after studying or doing any external activities, is it migraine?

MBBS
General Physician, Cuttack
If you have recurrent attack of headache 1. It could be a tension headache due to anxiety/stress, depression inadequate sleep, low bp/high bp, migraine, prolonged use of cell phone/computer, chronic anaemia, refractive error, chronic sinusitis, organic brain lesion 2. Avoid stress, physical and mental exertion, have adequate sound sleep for 7-8 hours daily in the night 3. Go for regular exercise 4. Practice yoga, meditation and deep breathing exercise to calm your mind, control your emotion and relieve stress 5. Check for refractive error, sinusitis hemoglobin, bp 6. Avoid prolonged use of cell phone/computer 7. Consult neurologist to rule out other causes of headache, if required take a ct scan of head to exclude any brain lesion 8. If it is migraine you have to take migraine prophylactic drug after consulting neurologist.
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