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Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam

MBBS, Diploma in Psychological Medicine, MD - Psychiatry

Psychiatrist, Chennai

40 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam MBBS, Diploma in Psychological Medicine, MD - Psychiatry Psychiatrist, Chennai
40 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam
Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam is an experienced Psychiatrist in Poonamallee High Road, Chennai. She has been a practicing Psychiatrist for 40 years. She is a MBBS, Diploma in Psychological Medicine, MD - Psychiatry . You can meet Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam personally at Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam@A.K. Hospital in Poonamallee High Road, Chennai. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. M.Rama Rao Mannam on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
MBBS - Kurnool Medical College, Kurnool - 1977
Diploma in Psychological Medicine - Kasturba Medical College, Manipal - 1991
MD - Psychiatry - Kasturba Medical College, Manipal - 1990
Professional Memberships
Indian Psychiatric Society

Location

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No.360, Poonamallee High Road, Aminjikarai.Landmark: Near Sky Walk.Chennai Get Directions
200 at clinic
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I'm 27 years old I have problems of mental illness. Every time every thing I think negative For that I feel depressed and I loosing wight. Please help me out.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Vadodara
I'm 27 years old I have problems of mental illness. Every time every thing I think negative 
For that I feel depresse...
Dear patient, depression has a very good answer in homeopathy and it requires complete case taking. It cures without any chance of recurrence. You can consult privately for further case discussion.
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I am 57 years old, male, having mixed Depression-Anxiety and Schizophrenia since 1987. I have taken innumerous drugs for the above ailments, but right now, I am taking a) Venlor XR 150 mg 1-0-0 B) Mirtaz 15 mg 0-0-1 for depression-anxiety. A) Sizodon plus 0-0-1 B) Sizopin 25 mg 0-0-1 for Schizophrenia and Lithosun 300 mg 0-0-1 as a mood stabilizer. There is relief. But of late (say, since a month), I have a problem. There is numbness in a part of my left wrist (near the thumb area) and it is spreading upwards. What is the problem? Is it due to the drugs I am taking or a neurological one? Please confirm.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Bundi
I am 57 years old, male, having mixed Depression-Anxiety and Schizophrenia since 1987. I have taken innumerous drugs ...
There are long term side effects of drugs you use and problem could be neurological as well until excluded. I would suggest to start getting herbal support of brain toners, neurotonics and other herbal memory enhancers. Jatamansi, shankhpushpi, brahmi, calcined pearl etc play a vital role. Better to avoid otc products and get it prepared through some vaidya or practicing ayurveda doctor. Practice of pranayam, meditation, yoga postures, walks are very important.
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I am 20 years old boy and I am having pain on right side of my face over the cheeks beside the nose and also feeling a type of headache over right eye on forehead section. Please tell me what is happening and what are its home remedies?

MBBS, cc USG
General Physician, Noida
I am 20 years old boy and I am having pain on right side of my face over the cheeks beside the nose and also feeling ...
Hello, Symptoms you are describing seems to be due to Maxillary Sinusitis Kindly do Steam inhalation carefully by steam inhaler twice a day for 2-3 days You can do Breathing exercises/ Brisk walking as this will ventilate sinus As CT scan PNS is advised to diagnose maxillary sinusitis but first you consult ENT doctor for evaluation and kindly tell me what Doctor has diagnosed
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Caring for Child's Mental Health

Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Kannur
Caring for Child's Mental Health
It is not enough to merely focus on the physical health of children. Parents should take primary responsibility for safeguarding the mental health of children, preventing them from going astray and making them good human beings and responsible citizens. Thus we can create a healthy society
74 people found this helpful

All About Forensic Psychiatry

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Delhi
All About Forensic Psychiatry

Forensic psychiatry is generally identified as a specialized offshoot of psychiatry, dealing with the calculated treatment and evaluation of mentally disordered offenders in secure hospitals, prisons and in the community. This branch of psychiatry requires an indepth understanding and thorough knowledge of the connection between legality and mental health. 

Patients of Forensic Psychiatry, generally are affected with personality dysfunctions, mental illness, psychopathic disorders, organic brain damage, learning disability and other conditions, such as histories of abuse and traumatic experiences as well as substance abuse and misuse.

Nature of the work
The most important prerequisite of this branch of psychiatry is a secure and safe environment where the subjects are liable to legal restrictions. Evaluation and assessment may vary from highly secured hospitals and prisons to low secure units and community based services. Forensic psychiatrists must have a thorough knowledge of civil, criminal and case law because of their frequent dealings with criminal justice agencies and the courts. 

An important component of Forensic Psychiatry is risk assessment and evaluation. Forensic psychiatrists must be fluent and adept at handling patients during emergencies or routine situations. Moreover, they should be calm, composed and professional in their dealings, especially with patients who display instability or violent and aggressive behavior.

The probation service, the prison service and the courts generally rely on forensic psychiatrists for expert advice, precisely because of their familiarity with preparing reports for mental health review tribunals and criminal justice agencies.

Imperatives: 

  1. Quintessentially, the obligatory role of a forensic psychiatrist requires:
  2. Ability to treat others with understanding and respect
  3. Ability to work flexibly
  4. Emotional resilience along with the ability to empathize with patients
  5. Anticipation and an inherent initiative to work in challenging situations
  6. Good communication skills
  7. A scientific and analytic approach and assessment
  8. Good leadership qualities
3609 people found this helpful

Meri age 25 hai orr mai pichle 5saal se smoking krrha hu mai kitna bhi try kru magr mai smoking krna band nahi karpara hu mera face bht dull hogya hai lips bhi boht dark hogye hai. Kya koi medicine hai jisse mai apni iss habit ko change krsku or kya koi medicine h jisse meri skin or lips normal hojye pehle ki tarah. Please suggest.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Ludhiana
Meri age 25 hai orr mai pichle 5saal se smoking krrha hu mai kitna bhi try kru magr mai smoking krna band nahi karpar...
I feel really happy for you guys who have guts to digest the truth that habitual smoking is an addiction and I am very much sure that guys like you although understand the disatrous effectss of habitual smoking but out of their craving or compulsion are unable to do so. But I wll try to figure out a clear picture in front of you and let you decide how to quit this habit as I think you are strong enough to quit this habit as you have a strong mind to accept this addiction.-----------------------myself is a homoeopath and I will prescribe you a homoeopathic medicine which will help you in coming out of your withdrawl symptoms after quitting smoking quiet easily along with management for how to quit smoking and change in texture of your skin and lips--------------consult me-----------
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I am 30 having nervousness due to shy of my radish one side birthmark, understanding problem, even unable to talk, quick memory loss etc this makes me worst panic attack. And makes too much depressed.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
I am 30 having nervousness due to shy of my radish one side birthmark, understanding problem, even unable to talk, qu...
Reddish mark can be removed by laser therapy and be calm . Try natural depression control or you need medication
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What are the reason for lack of confidence and hesitation?

PhD (Psychology), MSc Psychology, MS
Psychologist,
What are the reason for lack of confidence and hesitation?
Dear , lack of confidence either means lack of experience or lack of knowledge. Therefore improve your experience and knowledge. Self confidence automatically comes. You may request for online counseling session with me. I clear all your doubts and provide tips for personality development. Take care.
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I'm suffering from fever & headaches and pain in my whole body what I should do to get well soon I had taken many medicine also but till now I am not feeling well.

MBBS, MBA (Healthcare)
General Physician, Delhi
I'm suffering from fever & headaches and pain in my whole body what I should do to get well soon I had taken many med...
check your BP. check your eye sight .take crocin pain relief one sos for severe headache. take rest and good sleep. avoid stress. inform if not ok.
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I am 25 female. Suffering from major breakdown in every area of my life. One bad incident and whole life came crashing down. I am trying very hard to deal with it but it just seems impossible to come out of of. Death seems to be the only way to freedom from this struggle. But problem is, I am not a weak person and though I really want to anyhow just free myself from this, suicide is not my way.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear Lybrate user. I can understand. Definitely yes. Suicide is not your way. You have enough experience fighting negative situations in your life. All those situations gave you a lot of positive lessons which are your greatest assets. Be proud of them. As you had see many negatives, the bright part is near. Don't surrender. Positives are round the corner. Be patient. Take care.
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Is it normal when you have chronic anxiety disorder chest pain body weakness and legs and arms weak tingling and numb. Can it also cause physical and other mental health problems like brain stoke inability to walk hips and knees joint pain really severe can panel ginseng help with that.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Is it normal when you have chronic anxiety disorder chest pain body weakness and legs and arms weak tingling and numb...
Dear Lybrate user, Anxiety disorders are a category of mental disorders characterized by feelings of anxiety and fear, where anxiety is a worry about future events and fear is a reaction to current events. These feelings may cause physical symptoms, such as a racing heart and shakiness. There are a number of anxiety disorders: including generalized anxiety disorder, a specific phobia, social anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, and panic disorder among others. While each has its own characteristics and symptoms, they all include symptoms of anxiety. I need to know more about your anxiety so that I will be able to diagnose it properly and provide you tips to overcome and manage your anxiety. Take care.
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How to make my parents understand that I want divorce (arrange marriage) ? How to face society stigma?

BDS, Certification in hypnotherapy, Certification in N.L.P, Certification in Gene and behavior, Psychology at Work
Psychologist, Gurgaon
How to make my parents understand that I want divorce (arrange marriage) ? How to face society stigma?
Your happiness is paramount....everyone is running for it...all actions are centered around it. realize that and do whatever makes you happy...in this day and time, divorce are not uncommon.even in small cities..and I guess you are from a metro! Everyone gets used to The Change.....your parents will too...
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Hi I am feeling tired, stress and week from 3 months please help me

PhD (Psychology), MSc Psychology, MS
Psychologist,
Dear, stress is simply a reaction to a stimulus that disturbs our physical or mental equilibrium. In other words, it's an omnipresent part of life. A stressful event can trigger the? fight-or-flight? response, causing hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol to surge through the body. A little bit of stress, known as? acute stress? can be exciting? it keeps us active and alert. But long-term, or? chronic stress? can have detrimental effects on health. You may not be able to control the stressors in your world, but you can alter your reaction to them. I need to know, what are the causes with which you are stressed? once you know the reason, you will be able to adjust with it with some tips and tricks. Please let me know the details. Take care.
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Hi doctor I am smoker but I left smoking it's more than 5 months, now I smoke but once in a weak or in ten days but still I feal weakness sometime breathing problems little bit chest all time, I eat fruits daily and also outside food also sometimes, What is best natural way or food other than exercise than I must increase in my meal to decrease such chest pain and weakness.

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Hi doctor
I am smoker but I left smoking it's more than 5 months, now I smoke but once in a weak or in ten days but s...
Dear lybrateuser, -first try to stop smoking completely since one or two cigarettes occasionally can lead you to more numbers slowly -slowly -for your problems take a healthy diet & do regular exercises --eat vegetables, fruits, whole grain foods like oats, dalia, dairy products like milk, eggs, paneer, nuts, non-veg like fish, chicken, have yoghurt daily -start doing exercises to increase your strength & stamina, do brisk walking, jogging, swimming, yoga, after sometime your problems will go away.
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I have fever over three days and also have body pain and head ache I took some paracetamol but didn't reduced platelet count was 1 lakh. Is it dengue fever? What are the signs and symptoms and treatment measures,

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I have fever over three days and also have body pain and head ache I took some paracetamol but didn't reduced platele...
Hi there if you believe that you may be having dengue fever, please consult an infectious disease specialist so as to have your blood counts monitored and tested for dengue fever. I hope this helps with your visit with a general physician a referral to a higher center may be necessary. Please do not neglect your health. Hope this helps.
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I have two children. My husband live separate with us. And he did not gave proper money for home expense. So I have depression, frustration and less sleep. And less diet. So what can ido for get out in this situation. And depression. according to all this I have back pain, shoulder n neck pain.

Ph.D - Ayurveda, MD - Ayurveda, Diploma in Diet and Nutrition, Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), Diploma Yoga
Ayurveda, Jaipur
I have two children. My husband live separate with us. And he did not gave proper money for home expense. So I have d...
Dear lybrate-user ji, first of all believe in god and have patience, these bad days will pass definitely and again you will feel the joyful days with your family - have faith in your destiny. As per your medical problems - go for a complete detox of your body with the help of ayurveda's panchakarma therapy. It includes abhyangam (massage with medicated oils) n medicated steam bath. This wud rejuvenate your body - improving your work efficiency and bettering your sleep. It will also strengthen your nerves and muscles. These procedures will take out the harmful toxins out of your body - cleansing your body. Also take shirodhara which would completely take the stress out of your body and you will feel light, fresh and full of energy. Strictly avoid all junks, oily -spicy food, pickles if you r eating, drink lots of water, juices or daily have fresh fruits. Try to keep your bowel clear.
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.
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When I learn something I get forget and when I meet with my friend then my mind don't give any idea to decide a topic for conversation.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath, Ludhiana
Homoeopathic medicine BACOPPA MONNERI ( Wilmar Schwabe India) Chew 2 tab twice daily BREN-UP ( ALLEN ) Drink 2 spoon 3 times daily Bramhari pranayam daily for 15 minutes Report after 30 days
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How to give up smoking?

PhD (Psychology), MSc Psychology, MS
Psychologist,
Dear, tobacco is addictive. Cigarette also contains 4000+ carcinogenic chemicals other than nicotine. The best method is to leave it and continue with your will power. There are other methods like nicotine replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy combined. If you? re ready to stop smoking and willing to get the support you need, you can recover from nicotine addiction and abuse abuse? no matter how bad the addiction or how powerless you feel. The first step in treating nicotine addiction is accepting that you have a problem. Confronting an addiction and accepting responsibility for your actions isn? t easy. But it? s a necessary step on the road to treatment and recovery. You should then consult a psychiatrist / psychologist who fill follow this treatment. 1. Detoxification using medicines. 2. Behavior modification with the help of therapies. 3. Counseling. 4. Medication to sustain and 5. Long term support. These given steps are essential for any addict to get effectively rid of smoking. Therefore, you need to stick to the treatment plan and cooperate with your psychiatrist / psychologist. Take care.
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I have lost my complete Interest in Almost everything, I Cannot watch a Movie till the end and Cannot play a Sport till the end. Fear is killing me. Negativity is killing me. 1000 Thoughts in my mind at once. I need Serious help.

MD - Alternative Therapies, BHMS
Homeopath, Mumbai
I have lost my complete Interest in Almost everything, I Cannot watch a Movie till the end and Cannot play a Sport ti...
Hello lybrate-user, To overcome your present thoughts and to have a more balanced and controlled mind you need treatment. On the basis of your present symptoms mentioned by you I would suggest you to take Bach flower remedy which are safe and non habit forming. You can take Cherry plum - 20 drops in half cup of water three times a day for a week and revert back for further guidance.
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