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Dr. M. Murugan - Psychiatrist, Chennai

Dr. M. Murugan

MBBS, Diploma In Psychological Medicine (DPM), Doctor of Medicine (MD), Psych...

Psychiatrist, Chennai

25 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
Dr. M. Murugan MBBS, Diploma In Psychological Medicine (DPM), Doctor of ... Psychiatrist, Chennai
25 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic  ·  ₹ online
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. M. Murugan
Dr. M.Murugan is a renowned Psychiatrist in Chetpet, Chennai. Doctor is currently associated with Dr. Murugan's Clinic in Chetpet, Chennai. Don?t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. M.Murugan on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has an excellent community of Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MBBS - JSS Medical College, Mysore - 1991
Diploma In Psychological Medicine (DPM) - Christian Medical College, Vellore - 1996
Doctor of Medicine (MD), Psychiatry - University College London - 2004
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Master of Science (MSc), Child & Adolescent Psychiatry - Kings College London - 2004
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English

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#S60 & 61, 20th Street, Anna Nagar. Landmark: Near Iyappan Temple & Annanagar Tower, ChennaiChennai Get Directions
200 at clinic
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I am an iit aspirant and I am not able to learn so quickly as my other friends. My learning power getting low day by day. How to improve my mind power? I could not focus on one thing. My mind set changes so quickly. What to do?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem-solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Have a special place of learning, which should be well lit, with soft painted walls, well-ventilated, with no distractions. When you get bored, study by writing. If you repeat learning, at least, five to seven times, you will apparently remember for a longer time. Sit comfortably but do not slouch. The reading material should be of a fairly large print. Study at small intervals of about 40 minutes and then take a break or change the subject. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. There is a new exercise called Super Brain Yoga, which is done by holding the right earlobe with your left thumb and index finger, and the left earlobe with your right hand’s thumb and index finger. In this position, you must squat down and rise up and do this for five minutes every day. There is some memory enhancing techniques and study methods that your teacher will be able to guide you with. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely The following foods do help too: Blueberries, walnuts, turmeric, Spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, acorn squash, green tea, oily fish, boiled egg, turkey, apples, oatmeal, leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds, avocado, cinnamon, thyme, sunflower seeds, and red wine. Avoid sugar and junk food.

I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.

I am frequently losing my memory.I want to improve it. my age is 24. Can I know the remedy for it ?

(MRCPSYCH-UK), MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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Forgetfulness and decreased concentration can be a symptom of depression or anxiety. Consult a psychiatrist for effective treatment. Eat well, sleep on time, maintain a regular day structure, meditation, breathing exercises, focus on the task, rehearse all these will improve your memory and concentration.

I am 25 years old man I am marfin addict from last 1 year.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, (MRCPSYCH-UK)
Psychiatrist
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In India one does not get morphine easily. It is an injection. You could mean heroine addict. Kindly get admitted to a de addiction hospital for the treatment.

I am 38 years old . Due to family issue my unconditional love with my soulmate got break up . He never make one cell or msg till now so tis sudden loneliness n ignorance makes Me so depressed.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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If family issues have come in the way and only if they cannot be resolved you need to take such an extreme measure. Now it seems like he has taken that extreme step and that means it cannot be resolved. If this is true, you must learn to accept it and move on. I know it is difficult but that is the way life has turned. You do not want to be seen chasing after the boy. If he really loves you, he will find a way, in fact, he will find any way back. Since he is not doing this, act with respect and carry on with life. If it is too difficult, meet with a counselor and get some help.

Hello I am always treated as logical persons I gave advices how and why our families and friends are important to us I gave preechings to my friends of different religions how can we stay together and could add value to bring unity among all of our different religion friends But I personally get disturbed when I think that what I shall do to make sure my parents are healthy my small kids remain safe and am getting disturbed when I think about any death of such whom I know but died in young ages so on so on and also I am disturbed about a question what is there after the life ends this us small but impacts my whole think box.

Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S)
Ayurveda
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Hello I am always treated as logical persons I gave advices how and why our families and friends are important to us ...
Face your fear. Spend some time in government hospital, outside postmartum house, cremation centres, funeral ceremonies, slums and also join marriage ceremonies, birth ceremonies. Overall take out yourself from imaginary world completely based on hopes and expectations. SEE AND ACCEPT GOOD AND BAD BOTH. And after that when you feel yourself as viewer TRY TO MAKE BALANCE IN IMAGINATION AND REALITY. But please take yourself out of fear first.

What Does 3 Cigarettes a Day Do to You?

MD PULMONARY, DTCD
Pulmonologist
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What Does 3 Cigarettes a Day Do to You?

Smoking can cause irreparable damage to your mind and body. Chemicals in the tobacco travel to all parts of the body, leaving no area unaffected. According to available data, smoking causes 30% of all cancer deaths and about 80% deaths from emphysema and bronchitis. In addition to adversely affecting yourself, smoking also has a severe impact on your near and dear ones. According to WHO, about 600,000 people die every year from passive smoking. Out of the deaths that occur due to this, 1/3rd is that of children.

The Indian situation
While 85% of tobacco users worldwide consume it in the form of cigarettes, in India only 13% use it in that form. Additionally, 54% use it in the form of beedis. A study conducted on Indian smokers has revealed that an average of 8.2 cigarettes is smoked by an individual daily.

The study also revealed that the number of cigarettes smoked every year had grown to over 6 trillion. While 1 out of 10 adults dies from tobacco use worldwide, 5% of deaths in women and 20% of deaths in men in India are caused by cigarette and beedi smoking.

What happens when you smoke?
Cigarette smoke is made up of 4000 chemicals that are present either as tiny particles or gases and about 50 are known to lead to cancer, the toxin nicotine being one of them. In addition to nicotine, the chemicals that make up cigarette smoke also include tar and carbon monoxide. Prolonged exposure to these toxins can hamper your body's ability to filter air and clean the lungs. The smoke not only irritates the lungs but also causes excess production of mucus.

It also causes a paralysis of the tiny hair-like structures like cilia that line the airways and are responsible for removing dust and dirt from the organ. Paralysis of these hair-like structures also causes a buildup of mucus and toxic substances, leading to lung congestion. The extra mucus that is produced causes smokers to suffer from the very ubiquitous smoker's cough and chronic bronchitis.

It's also one of the many triggers of asthma, which brings about the narrowing and inflammation of the airways. Long-term exposure to tobacco smoke causes the destruction of the structure of the lung, walls of the airways as well as lung tissue. The result is a condition known as emphysema. Additionally, smoking also leads to cancer of the lung and over 80% lung cancer cases occur due to this habit.

What Does 3 Cigarettes a Day Do to You?

How to avoid so much of stress in our mind?

M.s Counselling Psychology, B.tech
Psychologist
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Stress and anxiety is part of life, it signifies you are alive and are willing to make choices and face the consequences. Avoiding is not the way but learning to deal with it is important.

I am graduating this year and I still haven't planned my career. Help me to compete this stress.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist
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I am graduating this year and I still haven't planned my career. Help me to compete this stress.
Dear lybrate-user. You have already selected your career. Your graduation is the first career step. Please stick to the subject and specialty. You may talk to a psychologist online who will administer career selection test and tell you which area or stream you should select so as to excel in your future. Take care.

Hello, these days I feel very sleepy inspite of having 6 hrs of sound sleep. Whenever I sit for study I feel drowsy and sleepy. Also I am not able to concentrate in class as I sleep during lecture. Pls suggest something to overcome this problem. It's exam time.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda
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Hello, these days I feel very sleepy inspite of having 6 hrs of sound sleep. Whenever I sit for study I feel drowsy a...
First of all you should follow some basic thing 1. Avoid=hot and cold at time 2. Less the sugar as much as possible if you want to eat sweet take juggery which is black 3. Do not drink water after meal drink at the time of meal sip by sip up to 150 ml 4. Avoid late night sleep 5. Avoid to eat spicy food, besan, bekary food, overeating, junk food. 6. Every 3 day in month eat mung dal and rice for whole day.

Is there a permanent cure for schizophrenia>my daughter is taking sizopin 100mg, riscon 2mg, lopez 3mg, besides diabetic medicines glycomet 1000mg. Kindly advice whether there is any permanent solution?

M.D,Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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No there is no permanent cure for schizophrenia. If she is not yet settled then increase dose of sizopin slowly. Go for tlc and dlc.

I am 29 years old and next month will be 30 years. My face is getting dull day by day coz of having lots of tension in my personal and professional life. What to do?

D.C.A.H, F.C.G.P., P.G.D.I.H, F.I.C.A. (USA), M.B.B.S.
Psychiatrist
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I am 29 years old and next month will be 30 years. My face is getting dull day by day coz of having lots of tension i...
Meet a life coach and mentor, this is all stress and worries of life. May be issues of love/future marriage, you may be having insecurities and fear. Just relax. Ask yourself what bothers you? have a positive self-talk, and learn what are those things you don't like. You need to accept your self and move on. You need to take care of your lifestyle and learn to be happy. If you cant do it yourself, meet a life coach/ stress management super-specialist like me. Once you open your heart out, you will feel free and begin to fly in life. I assure you that I can manage this and help u. You may consult me as well.

I lost somebody close last year and since then fell very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Please help me.

M.D Psychiatry , Diploma in Psychological Medicine, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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I lost somebody close last year and since then fell very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Please ...
Lybrate-user you are suffering from depression. There are chemicals in our brain that control our emotions, thought's, behaviour. Depression is caused by decrease in chemical called serotonin. Consult a psychiatrist for your treatment.

Hello Sir, I am 28 years old male. I am always feeling nervous to interact with people. Please suggest me some best medicine for that.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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Hello Sir, I am 28 years old male. I am always feeling nervous to interact with people. Please suggest me some best m...
Feeling nervous to interact to people is a part of social anxiety. This can also be kart of generalised anxiety disorder. It usually occurs due to anticipation of failure and fear of what people may make opinions about you. This is however completely treatable with medications and counselling.

If a person sleeps late in night and woke up late in the morning so what are is its consequences What should one do to remove mental stress to increase its remembrance ability.

MBBS
General Physician
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If a person sleeps late in night and woke up late in the morning so what are is its consequences What should one do t...
1. You need 7-8 hours of sound sleep to remain healthy. Inadequate sleep can cause stress, anger, irritability, lack of concentration, lethargic feeling, drowsiness etc2. Avoid stress and anxiety 3. Go for regular exercise and play some games 4. Do yoga, meditation, and deep breathing exercise like pranayama to calm your mind, control your emotions and relieve stress 5. Sleep for 7-8 hours daily to remain healthy 6. Take good nourishing diet, plenty of green leafy vege tables, fruits and drink plenty of water 7. Check your hemoglobin, bp and consult doctor 8. Consult for further advice 1. Go for regular exercise and play some games 2. Find time for relaxation like watching tv/listening music etc. 3. Develop some new hobby like painting/reading/writing 4. Do yoga, meditation, and deep breathing exercise like pranayama to calm your mind, control your emotions and relieve stress 5. Avoid smoking/alcohol if you take 6. Sleep for 7-8 hours daily to remain healthy 7. Socialise with friends/relatives/family members 8. Take good nourishing diet, plenty of green leafy veg tables, fruits and drnk plenty of water 8. Avoid severe physical and mental exertion 9. Check your hemoglobin, bp and consult doctor for further advice)

My 15 years old son not able to concentrate on study i: e when he starts study his mind goes elsewhere. But he is interested for study. In such case please advice me.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist
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Dear, you must be able to understand concentration, attention span, recollection and distraction. If you are able to watch a movie for two hours continuously, if you are able to play a game for an hour, then you do not have any concentration problems. You can't be attentive towards your studies because you are not interested in it. You are able to watch movie and play game because you are interested in it. Human cannot be attentive towards anything for more than 10 minutes. Then you should study in such a way that your attention is continued and make the subjects are interesting to you. Effective learning techniques should help your son. Recollection depends on anxiety, stress and other physical and circumstantial factors. Distractions while studying are plentiful. You should be able to overcome distractions or avoid distractions. Please understand the above. Help change your son's study style and attitude accordingly. Please post a private question to me and I will help your son with" effective learning" techniques. Take care.

Hello Doctor, Please tell me how to get out from stress, tension, depression please suggest simple advice's in detail.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath
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Hello Doctor, Please tell me how to get out from stress, tension, depression please suggest simple advice's in detail.
BRAMARI PRANAYAM Early morning for 15 minutes along with lots of water during the day is your answer. BRAMARI PRANAYAM or Bee Breath 1.Close your eyes. Focus on your breathing. 2.Place your thumbs in your ears, your index fingers above your eyebrows, and your remaining along the sides of your nose. Keep each pinky finger near a nostril. 3.Breath in deeply through the nose. First, feel the diaphragm move down, allowing the lungs to expand and forcing the abdomen out; then feel your chest expand with your collar bones rising last. .4.Use your pinkies to partially close each nostril. Keep your lungs filled. .5.Breathe out through the nose while humming. Note that the humming sound should originate in your throat, not as a result of your partially-blocked nostrils. 6.Repeat twenty times.starting from 5 times

Could you suggest me names of some antiperspirants names?

PhD (Psychology), MSc Psychology, MS
Psychologist
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Dear , there are many antiperspirants available in the market from leading brands. Some of them are allergic and therefore you should use it to know it. Antiperspirants are not prescription item or scheduled drug. You may use it across the counter. But I suggest you to consult a dermatologist if your perspiration problem is beyond a certain limit and if you have bad odor. Take care.

I am suffering from depression since last two month. I need help to spend a happy life. please help me. Please.

L L. B..,, M.Sc psychy,, N L P, P.G.D.G.C, M.S psychotherapy,, M.A child care, M A, clinical psy, M.A,social psychiatry,, M.Phil., psychology., Ph.D .,psychology
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I am suffering from depression since last two month. I need help to spend a happy life. please help me. Please.
Two moths are very early period. In this stage do not go to medicine. It has some side effects. Better to consult psychologist for psychological counselling. Take the help to him. Express your internal frustrated thoughts to him. Then he suggest some of the methods to come out from the depressive status. Better to practice relaxation therapy and behaviour therapy with the help of psychologist. Then you come out from the problem. Do not worry it is treatable. It is permanent lifestyle modification therapy. Better to consult a very good psychologist in kolkata. Best of luck. My best wishes.

I have quit smoking and drinking since 2nd September and on earlier occasion also I had tried but all relapsed. But this time I am quite serious. Please advise what other precautions should I take so that I am successful this time.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
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Congratulations. It will relapse unless you have willpower. Even medicines will not work if your will power don't work. Usemyour will power. Increase it considerably. Take care.
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