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Dr. Julie Mercy J David - Physiotherapist, Chennai

Dr. Julie Mercy J David

89 (19323 ratings)
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT

Physiotherapist, Chennai

22 Years Experience  ·  300 at clinic  ·  ₹100 online
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Dr. Julie Mercy J David 89% (19323 ratings) Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, ... Physiotherapist, Chennai
22 Years Experience  ·  300 at clinic  ·  ₹100 online
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I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Julie Mercy J David
Dr. Julie Mercy J David Raja is an experienced Physiotherapist in Valasaravakkam, Chennai. She has had many happy patients in her 20 years of journey as a Physiotherapist. She has completed Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT. You can visit her at Mercy Physiotherapy Clinic in Valasaravakkam, Chennai. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Julie Mercy J David Raja on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Physiotherapists in India. You will find Physiotherapists with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Physiotherapists online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity - KU Leuven University, Belgium & Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway - 2008
MPT - Allahabad Agricultural University - 2007
BPTh/BPT - Tamilnadu Dr. MGR Medical University - 1997
Languages spoken
English
Professional Memberships
Indian Association of Physiotherapist
Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI)
International Federation of Adapted Physical Activity

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Mercy Physiotherapy Clinic

No. 25/6, 1st Floor Narmada Street, Radha Krishnan Salai Valasaravakkam, Chennai -Chennai Get Directions
  4.5  (19323 ratings)
300 at clinic
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"Very helpful" 1223 reviews "knowledgeable" 800 reviews "Prompt" 53 reviews "Professional" 168 reviews "Practical" 137 reviews "Well-reasoned" 272 reviews "Caring" 281 reviews "Sensible" 113 reviews "Helped me impr..." 122 reviews "Thorough" 134 reviews "Saved my life" 32 reviews "Nurturing" 26 reviews "Inspiring" 86 reviews

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I've been diagnosed with scrotal varicocele and been experiencing a weird sensation in both my legs a kind of pain. Can it be due to the varicocele?

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I've been diagnosed with scrotal varicocele and been experiencing a weird sensation in both my legs a kind of pain. C...
Varicose vein Compression Wearing compression stockings is vital for preventing and treating varicose veins. They steadily squeeze your legs to help improve your circulation. They may also help to relieve pain, discomfort or swelling in your legs. Walking Just walk more. It’s a great way to encourage blood circulation in your legs. Pedaling Lie flat on your back. Place your hands out to your sides. If you prefer you can place them beneath your buttocks to prevent strain to the lower back. Lift your legs off the floor, and pedal them as if you were pedaling a bicycle. The more you elevate your legs, the more you will increase blood circulation. Leg Lifts Lie on your back with your hands beneath your buttocks. Keep your buttocks pressed down, and your lower back against the floor. Lift one leg at a time and hold in an elevated pose perpendicular to the floor until you feel the blood begin to flow back up from your feet, calves, and thighs. Repeat with your other leg. Alternately, you can raise both legs and rotate your ankles to further improve leg circulation. Knee bends with ankle flexion Lie again on the floor on your back. Slowly pull one knee into your chest, holding onto your leg behind your knee (holding on top of the kneecap puts undue pressure on this delicate joint). Now, point and flex your foot several times. Do this slowly and forcefully – don’t let your foot flap around loosely, but rather tighten the muscles of the calves and the tendons around your ankle. Repeat with the opposite leg. The same measures to treat the discomfort from varicose veins can help prevent them: •Watching your weight; •A high-fiber, low-salt diet; •Avoiding high heels and tight hosiery; •Elevating your legs; •Avoid crossing your legs; •Changing your sitting or standing position regularly.

I am feeling heel pain for last 2 days while walking, its a little pain but its very irritating. Whenever I sit or laid down, the pain disappears. Please tell what to do, how to manage these pain and for how long this will continue. Is this really that dangerous?

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I am feeling heel pain for last 2 days while walking, its a little pain but its very irritating. Whenever I sit or la...
Get treated with Ultrasonic therapy which would directly heal the calcaneal spur (inflammation of the calcaneum bone) which causes the heel pain in majority of the cases. Along with ultrasonic therapy, shortwave diathermy also can be given. Simultaneously it is better to wear MCR chappals (micro cellular rubber) which will help to transfer the weight evenly in the feet so that the weight will be completely felt in the heel area. Simultaneously it is better to wear MCR chappals (micro cellular rubber) which will help to transfer the Plantar Fascitis weight evenly in the feet so that the weight will be completely felt in the heel area. You shall do contrast bath to relieve this pain. Contrast bath is nothing but keeping in one tub hot water (bearable heat) and in another tub cold water Ask your father to apply ice in the painful area which would definitely help to greater extent. If still the pain persists then it is better to keep TENS stimulation at one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics.

How to find pelvic muscles to perform kegel exercise? Is there any side effect of doing kegel?

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
How to find pelvic muscles to perform kegel exercise? Is there any side effect of doing kegel?
Kegel exercises primarily aid men with urinary incontinence. Besides preventing embarrassing urine leakage, they also decrease the urge to void. Secondly, they have been shown to help male sexual health by allowing some men's erections to last longer when affected by sexual dysfunction and premature ejaculation. These benefits all equate to a better quality of life. These exercises are often recommended to patients with weakened pelvic floor muscles such as patients with diabetes, patients having had a prostate surgery in the past such as a radical prostatectomy, or obese patients. It should also be mentioned that these exercises have not been scientifically proven to increase penis size and are thus not recommended solely for this purpose. Kegel exercises are harmless if performed correctly. Chest and abdominal pain have been reported in some, but these occurrences are the result of inappropriately performed exercises. •How to do kegel ex’s •Find the right muscles. To identify your pelvic floor muscles, stop urination in midstream or tighten the muscles that keep you from passing gas. These maneuvers use your pelvic floor muscles. Once you've identified your pelvic floor muscles, you can do the exercises in any position, although you might find it easiest to do them lying down at first. •Perfect your technique. Tighten your pelvic floor muscles, hold the contraction for three seconds, and then relax for three seconds. Try it a few times in a row. When your muscles get stronger, try doing Kegel exercises while sitting, standing or walking. •Maintain your focus. For best results, focus on tightening only your pelvic floor muscles. Be careful not to flex the muscles in your abdomen, thighs or buttocks. Avoid holding your breath. Instead, breathe freely during the exercises. •Repeat 3 times a day. Aim for at least three sets of 10 repetitions a day. Don't make a habit of using Kegel exercises to start and stop your urine stream. Some doctors think this could cause a bladder infection. Now that you have located your pelvic floor muscles, you can exercise them even when you do not have to urinate (pee) by following these simple steps: 1.Tighten and hold your pelvic floor muscles for five seconds (count 1 one thousand, 2 one thousand, 3 one thousand, 4 one thousand, 5 one thousand). 2.Relax your pelvic muscles. You have just done one Kegel exercise. You should plan to do 10 to 20 Kegel exercises three to four times each day. Another way to tighten your pelvic floor muscles is to: 1.Squeeze the muscles in your anus (like you are holding a bowel movement). 2.Relax your pelvic floor muscles after each attempt. 3.Repeat this exercise 10 to 20 times. When you do your Kegel exercises, remember•Do not hold your breath. •Do not push down. Squeeze your muscles together tightly and imagine that you are trying to lift this muscle up. •Do not tighten the muscles in your stomach, buttocks, or thighs. •Relax your pelvic floor muscles between each squeeze.
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Hi, I am a 59-year old suffering from psoriatic arthritis for the last 6 years. There has been severe itching too lately. I take an anti-histamine like Piriton nightly to control itchiness and help me to sleep as well, as recently I also suffer from insomnia. Is it okay for me to take Atarax 25 mg as well nightly? Or should I take 2 tablets Piriton instead?

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hi, I am a 59-year old suffering from psoriatic arthritis for the last 6 years. There has been severe itching too lat...
No cure exists for psoriatic arthritis, so treatment focuses on controlling inflammation in your affected joints to prevent joint pain and disability. Medications Drugs used to treat psoriatic arthritis include: NSAIDs. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Over-the-counter NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve). Stronger NSAIDs are available by prescription. Side effects may include stomach irritation, heart problems, and liver and kidney damage. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). These drugs can slow the progression of psoriatic arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage. Common DMARDs include methotrexate (Trexall), leflunomide (Arava), and sulfasalazine (Azulfidine). Side effects vary but may include liver damage, bone marrow suppression and severe lung infections. Immunosuppressants. These medications act to tame your immune system, which is out of control in psoriatic arthritis. Examples include azathioprine (Imuran, Azasan) and cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune). These medications can increase your susceptibility to infection. TNF-alpha inhibitors. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory substance produced by your body. TNF-alpha inhibitors can help reduce pain, morning stiffness, and tender or swollen joints. Examples include etanercept (Enbrel), infliximab (Remicade), adalimumab (Humira), golimumab (Simponi) and certolizumab (Cimzia). Potential side effects include nausea, diarrhea, hair loss and an increased risk of serious infections. Newer medications. Some newly developed medications for plaque psoriasis can also reduce the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. Examples include apremilast (Otezla), ustekinumab (Stelara) and secukinumab (Cosentyx). Surgical and other procedures Steroid injections. This type of medication reduces inflammation quickly and is sometimes injected into an affected joint. Joint replacement surgery. Joints that have been severely damaged by psoriatic arthritis can be replaced with artificial prostheses made of metal and plastic.

Perfect my body weight Height is perfect My body joint pain why? Please tell me how to cure my joint pain.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Perfect my body weight
Height is perfect My body joint pain why? 
Please tell me how to cure my joint pain.
You need to improve the tone of the muscles in a rhythmical manner. If you do that with proper diet restriction nothing will happen to you. Body pain is there after gym activity due to tiredness and you need to consume good protein and iron diet in your body which will help you to break the fatigue and body pain. You have to reduce the weight by walking minimum 3-4 kms per day. Slowly reduce the weight and slowly avoid adding salt in the diet which will help you to prevent water retention in the body. Excess salt in general leads to water in the body which might be the reason for you legs to pain as the leg will automatically become oedematous.

I am 48 years old. Recently"Trigger finger" has developed on my right thumb. Very surprised. What is the reason and what is the treatment.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I am 48 years old. Recently"Trigger finger" has developed on my right thumb. Very surprised. What is the reason and w...
Trigger finger treatment varies depending on its severity and duration. Medications Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs — such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or naproxen (Aleve) — may relieve the pain but are unlikely to relieve the swelling constricting the tendon sheath or trapping the tendon. Therapy Conservative noninvasive treatments may include: Rest. Avoid activities that require repetitive gripping, repeated grasping or the prolonged use of vibrating hand-held machinery until your symptoms improve. If you can't avoid these activities altogether, padded gloves may offer some protection. A splint. Your doctor may have you wear a splint at night to keep the affected finger in an extended position for up to six weeks. The splint helps rest the tendon. Stretching exercises. Your doctor may also suggest gentle exercises to help maintain mobility in your finger. Surgical and other procedures If your symptoms are severe or if conservative treatments haven't helped, your doctor might suggest: Steroid injection. An injection of a steroid medication near or into the tendon sheath may reduce inflammation and allow the tendon to glide freely again. This is the most common treatment, and it's usually effective for a year or more in most people treated. But sometimes it takes more than one injection. For people with diabetes, steroid injections tend to be less effective. Percutaneous release. After numbing your palm, your doctor inserts a sturdy needle into the tissue around your affected tendon. Moving the needle and your finger helps break apart the constriction that's blocking the smooth motion of the tendon. This treatment may be done under ultrasound control, so the doctor can see where the tip of the needle is under the skin to be sure it opens the tendon sheath without damaging the tendon or nearby nerves. This procedure is usually done in the doctor's office or in an office procedure room. Surgery. Working through a small incision near the base of your affected finger, a surgeon can cut open the constricted section of tendon sheath. This procedure is usually done in an operating room.

Myself 64 years old lady operated for Rt Knee joint replacement on 26th Nov. 2018. Discharged from on 30th Nov. 2018.Doctor has prescribe Paracetamol Tab IP 500 mg Xykaa. I took tab 1 BD after meal for two days. But I felt vomiting as well gastritis and burning feeling in upper digestive tract. Of course I took Nimesulide tablets 100 mg (Nice) 1 OD also along with for two days as per doctor's advise. Kindly tell me as to continue medicine and these side effects are because of this or not? I had a problem of RA. Thanks.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Myself 64 years old lady operated for Rt Knee joint replacement on 26th Nov. 2018. Discharged from on 30th Nov. 2018....
Simple Knee ExerciesSpecific knee exercises will also help ie. Keeping ball underneath the knee and keep pressing it. That's the simple exercise which will help you to strengthen the knee Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. We also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. Knee pain more than 2 weeks:if your knee is paining since 2 weeks, then you have to rethink whether you had any injury in the previous years. I also advise you to use knee cap which would help to prevent the knee from damaging further and also to maintain the quadriceps muscle tone. As arthritis is very common if anyone would've neglected any injury in the previous years. You can take Ultrasonic therapy in one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics which would help to heal the damaged cartilages along with shortwave diathermy which would help to improve the blood circulation. Ice therapy would definitely help to reduce the inflammation. You may do all of these exercises right away. It’s important to stretch the muscles in the back and on the side of your leg. It is also important to strengthen the muscles in your hip and on the top of your thigh so your kneecap won't dislocate again. •Standing hamstring stretch: Put the heel of the leg on your injured side on a stool about 15 inches high. Keep your leg straight. Lean forward, bending at the hips, until you feel a mild stretch in the back of your thigh. Make sure you don't roll your shoulders or bend at the waist when doing this or you will stretch your lower back instead of your leg. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Repeat 3 times. •Quad sets: Sit on the floor with your injured leg straight and your other leg bent. Press the back of the knee of your injured leg against the floor by tightening the muscles on the top of your thigh. Hold this position 10 seconds. Relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •Straight leg raise: Lie on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Bend the knee on your uninjured side and place the foot flat on the floor. Tighten the thigh muscle on your injured side and lift your leg about 8 inches off the floor. Keep your leg straight and your thigh muscle tight. Slowly lower your leg back down to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •Side-lying leg lift: Lie on your uninjured side. Tighten the front thigh muscles on your injured leg and lift that leg 8 to 10 inches (20 to 25 centimeters) away from the other leg. Keep the leg straight and lower it slowly. Do 2 sets of 15. •Prone hip extension: Lie on your stomach with your legs straight out behind you. Fold your arms under your head and rest your head on your arms. Draw your belly button in towards your spine and tighten your abdominal muscles. Tighten the buttocks and thigh muscles of the leg on your injured side and lift the leg off the floor about 8 inches. Keep your leg straight. Hold for 5 seconds. Then lower your leg and relax. Do 2 sets of 15. •Step-up: Stand with the foot of your injured leg on a support 3 to 5 inches (8 to 13 centimeters) high --like a small step or block of wood. Keep your other foot flat on the floor. Shift your weight onto the injured leg on the support. Straighten your injured leg as the other leg comes off the floor. Return to the starting position by bending your injured leg and slowly lowering your uninjured leg back to the floor. Do 2 sets of 15. •Wall squat with a ball: Stand with your back, shoulders, and head against a wall. Look straight ahead. Keep your shoulders relaxed and your feet 3 feet (90 centimeters) from the wall and shoulder's width apart. Place a soccer or basketball-sized ball behind your back. Keeping your back against the wall, slowly squat down to a 45-degree angle. Your thighs will not yet be parallel to the floor. Hold this position for 10 seconds and then slowly slide back up the wall. Repeat 10 times. Build up to 2 sets of 15. •Knee stabilization: Wrap a piece of elastic tubing around the ankle of your uninjured leg. Tie a knot in the other end of the tubing and close it in a door at about ankle height. •Stand facing the door on the leg without tubing (your injured leg) and bend your knee slightly, keeping your thigh muscles tight. Stay in this position while you move the leg with the tubing (the uninjured leg) straight back behind you. Do 2 sets of 15. •Turn 90 degrees so the leg without tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing away from your body. Do 2 sets of 15. •Turn 90 degrees again so your back is to the door. Move the leg with tubing straight out in front of you. Do 2 sets of 15. •Turn your body 90 degrees again so the leg with tubing is closest to the door. Move the leg with tubing across your body. Do 2 sets of 15. Hold onto a chair if you need help balancing. This exercise can be made more challenging by standing on a firm pillow or foam mat while you move the leg with tubing. •Resisted terminal knee extension: Make a loop with a piece of elastic tubing by tying a knot in both ends. Close the knot in a door at knee height. Step into the loop with your injured leg so the tubing is around the back of your knee. Lift the other foot off the ground and hold onto a chair for balance, if needed. Bend the knee with tubing about 45 degrees. Slowly straighten your leg, keeping your thigh muscle tight as you do this. Repeat 15 times. Do 2 sets of 15. If you need an easier way to do this, stand on both legs for better support while you do the exercise. •Standing calf stretch: Stand facing a wall with your hands on the wall at about eye level. Keep your injured leg back with your heel on the floor. Keep the other leg forward with the knee bent. Turn your back foot slightly inward (as if you were pigeon-toed). Slowly lean into the wall until you feel a stretch in the back of your calf. Hold the stretch for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times. Do this exercise several times each day. •Clam exercise: Lie on your uninjured side with your hips and knees bent and feet together. Slowly raise your top leg toward the ceiling while keeping your heels touching each other. Hold for 2 seconds and lower slowly. Do 2 sets of 15 repetitions. •Iliotibial band stretch, side-bending: Cross one leg in front of the other leg and lean in the opposite direction from the front leg. Reach the arm on the side of the back leg over your head while you do this. Hold this position for 15 to 30 seconds. Return to the starting position. Repeat 3 times and then switch legs and repeat the exercise.

I have pain in my backbone. And its arising from nearby tailbone. And it gets so much worst in cold days.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
I have pain in my backbone. And its arising from nearby tailbone. And it gets so much worst in cold days.
The lower end of the vertebral column is inflamed and that bone is called coccyx bone and the condition is called Coccydynia. The conservative management would be to keep ice in that inflamed area during one time in a day and also to sit in a hot water bowl where the penetration of the heat would help to reduce the inflammation. And to reduce the weight falling on the inflammed surface we suggest patients to use air cushion pillow (also called as doughnut pillow) where in the buttock's weight will not fall exactly on the painful tail bone and that would automatically reduce the pain. For this the best treatment would be to undergo Ultrasonic therapy in one of the nearby physiotherapy clinics.

Hi, My Right shoulder collar bone dislocated few years ago, but now I am facing two much problem due to shoulder freezing. Kindly suggest me. I'm 34 years old.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hi, My Right shoulder collar bone dislocated few years ago, but now I am facing two much problem due to shoulder free...
Restricting the movement of any broken bone is critical to healing. To immobilize a broken collarbone, you'll likely need to wear an arm sling. How long immobilization is needed depends on the severity of the injury. Bone union usually takes three to six weeks for children and six to 12 weeks for adults. A newborn's collarbone that breaks during delivery typically heals with only pain control and careful handling of the baby. Medications To reduce pain and inflammation, your doctor might recommend an over-the-counter pain reliever. If you have severe pain, you might need a prescription medication that contains a narcotic for a few days. Therapy Rehabilitation begins soon after initial treatment. In most cases, it's important to begin some motion to minimize stiffness in your shoulder while you're still wearing your sling. After your sling is removed, your doctor might recommend additional rehabilitation exercises or physical therapy to restore muscle strength, joint motion and flexibility. Surgery Surgery might be required if the fractured collarbone has broken through your skin, is severely displaced or is in several pieces. Broken collarbone surgery usually includes placing fixation devices — plates, screws or rods — to maintain proper position of your bone during healing. Surgical complications, though rare, can include infection and lack of bone healing. Lifestyle and home remedies Applying ice to the affected area for 20 to 30 minutes every few hours during the first two to three days after a collarbone break can help control pain and swelling.

Hi, Sprained ankle years ago. Then over summer sprained the same Ankle again. I did therapy for it and RICE. Yet now January still swollen and having throbbing pain.

Erasmus Mundus Master in Adapted Physical Activity, MPT, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Hi, Sprained ankle years ago. Then over summer sprained the same Ankle again. I did therapy for it and RICE. Yet now ...
Treating a sprained ankle promotes recovery and prevents further discomfort. It’s important not to put weight on the injured area while you’re recovering from an ankle sprain. Home treatments You may be able to treat mild sprains at home. Recommended home care treatments include: •using elastic bandages (such as an ACE bandage) to wrap your ankle, but not too tightly •wearing a brace to support your ankle •using crutches, if needed •elevating your foot with pillows as necessary to reduce swelling •taking ibuprofen (such as Advil) or acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) to manage pain •getting plenty of rest and not putting weight on your ankle It’s also helpful to apply ice to the injured area as soon as you can to reduce swelling. On the first day, you should apply ice every 20 to 30 minutes, three to four times per day. Afterward, apply ice every three to four hours for the next two days. Your doctor may tell you to stay off of your injured ankle until the pain subsides. For mild sprains, this may take a week to 10 days, while more severe sprains may take up to several weeks to heal. Shop for elastic bandages. How can I prevent an ankle sprain? You can lower your risk for future sprains by: •wrapping the affected ankle in an elastic bandage •wearing a brace, if necessary •performing strengthening exercises •avoiding high heels •warming up before exercising •wearing sturdy, quality footwear •paying attention to surfaces you’re walking on •slowing or stopping activities when you feel fatigued Call your doctor right away if you think you’ve sprained your ankle again. When left untreated, an ankle sprain can lead to long-term pain and instability in the ankle. Shop for ankle braces.
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