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Dr. J.Venkhatesh

MVSc

Veterinarian, Chennai

23 Years Experience  ·  350 at clinic
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Dr. J.Venkhatesh MVSc Veterinarian, Chennai
23 Years Experience  ·  350 at clinic
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Personal Statement

Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. J.Venkhatesh
Dr. J.Venkhatesh is a trusted Veterinarian in Velachery, Chennai. He has helped numerous patients in his 23 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He studied and completed MVSc . He is currently practising at AURO PET CLINIC in Velachery, Chennai. Book an appointment online with Dr. J.Venkhatesh and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 29 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Chennai and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MVSc - Madras Veterinary College - 1996
Languages spoken
English

Location

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AURO PET CLINIC

3rd Main Road, Jagannatha Puram, Velachery, Chennai ...Chennai Get Directions
350 at clinic
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I have 3 year old female Indian dog. She has problem getting up after sitting and has been walking slower than her usual pace. Vet here gave nurokind pet syrup, calcium supplement and bone builder. Yet I don't see any improvement. It has been three days since this started. Please suggest something.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., MVS
Veterinarian, Ahmedabad
Start her on pain medication and joint supplement. You can give Pet Cam syrup - it has a measuring syringe marked according to the dog's body weight- give once a day upto the appropriate bodyweight mark. Also she will need joint supplements added to her food like Maxima or Megaflex powder 1 scoop daily. If she's not better in a week's time it may be necessary to get xrays and further diagnostic tests done.
1 person found this helpful

I want to know about 15 months German Shepherd feed and the health problems which may cause. Thank you.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
15 months old German shepherd can be considered as an adolescent. they are now prone for hip joint problems like osteoarthritis, hip dysplasia and degenerative joint diseases. this can be prevented by avoiding their kennel or staying place on slippery floors like marbles and tiles. And by making sure they get a complete balanced diet containing ample amount of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids with minerals like calcium and phosphorus. they are also prone for gastrointestinal problems like inflammatory bowel disease and pancreatitis. this can be prevented by giving them hypoallergenic diets of various brands. eg. royal canine and Hill's. recently in India, there has been a subtle outbreak of tick fever in dogs. hairy breeds like German shepherds should be given extra care for proper and regular tick control medications life long to avoid such deadly diseases.
1 person found this helpful

Sir mera dog ka maggot his hai. Kuch medicine batao. Pls.konsi medicine usko dena chahiye. Pls help me. Medicine ki name bolo sir.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Nadia
You can apply TOPICURE or D'MAG spray to that part, where maggots are infested. Antibiotics and antihistaminic drugs are to be administered. Patient should be observed carefully.

My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful

Hi, Issue with an GSD male dog. Age: 2 and 1/2 years of weight 32 kgs. It is facing problem with limping of his front left leg. It can walk and no swelling happened. I consult my vet, he prescribed me calcium deficiency and multi vitamin syrup and also please suggest me the best deworming medicine and dosage for it. Thank you.

bachelor of veterinary & Animal Husbandary
Veterinarian, Noida
Regarding limping part. Follow your vet prescriptions, deworm your pet every 3 month and each time try to change the deworming agent to cover more range of worms. Generally for 1 tab/10 kg body weight presentations are available so you can use 3 tab together to deworm your pet.
1 person found this helpful

I have a pet dog of 1 year 4months age. There are few blister type formation just near his mouth. Sometimes blood comes out from it. Any idea what is it?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Its because of oral ulcer may be due to vitamin c defeciency please have him with fish oil and vitamins tablets.
9 people found this helpful

What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Varanasi
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

1 person found this helpful

My cockatiel is sick and is not active. I recently bought it from pet shop. She doesn't make any noise and keeps on sleeping with her head under wings And is slightly swinging while sitting on perch.

bachelor of veterinary & Animal Husbandary
Veterinarian, Noida
My cockatiel is sick and is not active. I recently bought it from pet shop. She doesn't make any noise and keeps on s...
Since you bought the bird recently so sudden change in environment may b stressful so leave your bird alone for few days, just put some treats in cage when your bird is very calm, sleeping with her head under wings is normal behaviour, and swingging tail is bcz of enjoying that particular moment. If your bird is not feeding properly then it is matter of concern and you have to visit vet clinic.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
"SCOOP THE POOP"
Every time you take your pet out for his daily business... carry a plastic bag and clean up the poop, to contribute your share to keep our environment clean!
Since dogs are meat eaters, their poop contents nitrogenous wastes and can contaminate nearby water bodies.
Dog poop can carry potentially harmful bacterias and worms, which can spread within the area around and pose risk to other humans and pets..!
Besides, no one likes to step on pet waste and spread it to homes, cars and workplaces.
Be a responsible owner.. Scoop the poop!!!!
4 people found this helpful

Why do Puppies Need Deworming?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whip-worms are common among young puppies and kittens. All puppies should be given a dewormer for easily-prevented illness caused by these parasites. Read more about how to prevent parasites in your dog or cat

Common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

You've probably heard the names before

1. Roundworms, 2. Hookworms, 3. Whip-worms and 4. Tapeworms. These are the intestinal parasites most often seen in pets, and each of them can harm your dog or cat in unique ways.

Symptoms of intestinal parasites in pets
While worms are usually found in puppies and kittens, infection can occur in dogs and cats of all ages. Signs of an intestinal parasite infection can include:
Diarrhoea
Vomiting
Weight loss
Swollen stomach
Anemia
Death (in severe infestations)

Note that these signs can also be associated with other diseases so if you observe any of them, you should take your pet in to see your veterinarian for an examination. Diagnosing an intestinal parasite infection is usually done through a laboratory analysis of your pet’s faeces.
De-worming has become a controversial subject.
Developing de-worming strategies requires consideration of a several different things, including:
• What parasites are in the area?
• Are the risks the same all year round or are they seasonal?
• What parasites pose a risk to an individual pet or what are the pet’s chances of exposure? (e.g. Does the pet go outside? Is it exposed to many other animals? Are there multiple pets in the household?)
• Are there any people in the household at particular risk for parasitic infections? (e.g. young children, people with developmental disorders that might be more likely to be exposed to pet faeces?)
Everyone agrees puppies and kittens need more aggressive de-worming, but there are a few different approaches to managing de-worming in adult animals.
So as far as myself consider regular de-worming in these schedules:
STAGE ONE
Puppy de-worming: (age 40 days – 120 days) preferably suspension
(I don’t recommend de-worming puppies before 30 days as it may affect their nutritional absorption mechanism and reduce the immunity level, while they are feeding with the dam I think they are well protected. )
1. Puppy at the age of 40-60 days while doing the primary vaccine
2. Next second dose at the booster stage around 15 days from the first dose i.e. around 55 days – 75 days.
3. Third dose is at 90-120 days
STAGE TWO
Puppies at 120-180 Days of age: preferably tablet
De-worming around 180 days is preferable and do consult with your vets for specific drug of choice depending up on breed and their nature of infection they have
STAGE THREE:
Semi adult dogs 180 – 360 days: preferably tablets
In this period you can de-worm the puppy either once in 2 months if you have a group or pack of dogs or you can once in three months if you have just one dog with you
STAGE FOUR:
Adult dogs anything above 360 days
Once in every 3 months i.e.. yearly four times is the recommended Schedule for Asia
BITCH IN HEAT: special condition
Should be de-wormed at 4- 5 th day of heat and repeat dosage at 9-10th day second dose and third and final dose is after whelping and after the milking period stops i.e. after whelping 60 days apart best way to maintain the breeding bitch as per standards
Choosing the right dewormer for your dog
There are many different types and brands of de-wormers on the MARKET: and determining which dewormer to use, whether to administer it by pill or liquid, and at what dose can depend on a lot of factors.
Knowing which dewormer to use and at what dose can depend on a variety of things such as the type of intestinal parasite present, and the age, size and current health of your pet. Aside from reading the labels on de-worming products, it’s important to discuss the options and your dog’s unique needs with your veterinarian first.
Your veterinarian can recommend a product that’s appropriate for your pet after a diagnosis has been made of the type and species of the parasite. In addition, some medications can also be used to help control intestinal parasites. Considering that some parasites can infect people as well as pets, certain de-wormers may be used as a preventive measure to decrease the risk to humans.
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