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Diya Speciality Clinic, Chennai

Diya Speciality Clinic

  4.4  (42 ratings)

Neurologist Clinic

No. 2, Officer's Colony, 100 Feet Velachery Bypass Road, Velachery Chennai
1 Doctor · ₹500 · 11 Reviews
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Diya Speciality Clinic   4.4  (42 ratings) Neurologist Clinic No. 2, Officer's Colony, 100 Feet Velachery Bypass Road, Velachery Chennai
1 Doctor · ₹500 · 11 Reviews
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Our medical care facility offers treatments from the best doctors in the field of General Neurologist.We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you......more
Our medical care facility offers treatments from the best doctors in the field of General Neurologist.We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, quality health care that you deserve.
More about Diya Speciality Clinic
Diya Speciality Clinic is known for housing experienced Neurologists. Dr. Balasubramaniam S, a well-reputed Neurologist, practices in Chennai. Visit this medical health centre for Neurologists recommended by 83 patients.

Timings

MON, SAT
05:00 PM - 10:00 PM
TUE-FRI
05:00 PM - 09:00 PM
SUN
10:00 AM - 01:00 PM

Location

No. 2, Officer's Colony, 100 Feet Velachery Bypass Road, Velachery
Velachery Chennai, Tamil Nadu - 600042
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Doctor in Diya Speciality Clinic

Dr. Balasubramaniam S

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist
Book appointment and get ₹125 LybrateCash (Lybrate Wallet) after your visit
87%  (42 ratings)
16 Years experience
500 at clinic
₹250 online
Available today
05:00 PM - 09:00 PM
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"Prompt" 1 review "Well-reasoned" 1 review "knowledgeable" 4 reviews "Caring" 1 review "Very helpful" 1 review

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Brain Size and Intelligence: Does Size Matter?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Brain Size and Intelligence: Does Size Matter?

When it comes to the brain and IQ, is bigger better? Does size really matter? Is there really a connection between the size of your brain and intelligence? With the help of findings by neurologists and scientists, we seek to find out!

  1. Ailments and the brain: Scientists have found that children with autism have a brain that has grown in a disproportionate manner in the very first year of their life. This prevents the child from making connection in a normal manner. On the other hand, children and adolescents who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD show sign of having a much smaller brain size. Many scientists have shown that the size of the brain shrinks as we age and this does not have any visible effect on our cognitive abilities.
  2. It’s all relative: The size of the brain does not really have a bearing on the way a person’s cognition gets shaped. Even large mammals like elephants and whales are finally hunted and tamed by humans who have smaller brains in comparison. The brain is made up of billions of neurons, which need to function properly. It may be seen that scientists consider the brain mass in relation with the rest of the body so as to speculate about the cognitive abilities of the person. Why is this required? Large animals need a well functioning and proportionate brain size to control and run their organs with proper cognition for satisfactory results, which is what we humans seem to have done.
  3. Neanderthal brain: Historically, the earliest man or the Neanderthals are said to have had larger brains than we do. These people are believed to have brains that are at least 10% larger than the brains that we have in our modern times. The shape of their brain was different too. They were also heavily muscled people which had a bearing on the size and shape of the brain and bodies as well as the lean tissue within the brain. They also survived very successfully for a period of over 200,000 years, which obviously points to some form of elevated cognition, as per many scientists.
  4. Animals: While animals with small brains like lizards and reptiles do not perform too well on IQ tests, the animals with bigger brains like elephants and dolphins perform much better. But the medium sized brain of monkeys, lemurs and other animals are said to perform in the best manner. The correlation between the body size and the brain does not seem to hold good here, as per various researches.

So the verdict as per medical science and research stands divided!

1 person found this helpful

Migraine - Types and Treatment

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Migraine - Types and Treatment

Headaches and migraines can vary drastically depending on their duration, specific symptoms and the person they are affecting. The more you know about your specific type of headache or migraine, the better prepared you will be to treat them—and possibly even prevent them. The two types of migraine are- 

  1. Migraine without aura: The majority of migraine sufferers have Migraine without Aura. 
  2. Migraine with aura: Migraine with Aura refers to a range of neurological disturbances that occur before the headache begins, usually lasting about 20-60 minutes.

Symptoms of migraine vary and also depend on the type of migraine. A migraine has four stages: prodrome, aura, headache and postdrome. But it is not necessary that all the migraine sufferers experience all the four stages.

Prodrome: The signs of this begin to appear a day or two days before the headache starts. The signs include depression, constipation, food cravings, irritability, uncontrollable yawning, neck stiffness and hyperactivity.
Migraine Aura: Auras are a range of symptoms of the central nervous system. These might occur much before or during the migraine, but most people get a migraine without an aura. Auras usually begin gradually and increase in intensity. They last for an hour or even longer and are 

  • Visual: Seeing bright spots, various shapes, experiencing vision loss, and flashes of light
  • Sensory: Present in the form of touch sensations like feeling of pins and needles in the arms and legs
  • Motor: Usually related with the movement problems like the limb weakness
  • Verbal: It is related with the speech problems

Headache: In case of a migraine attack one might experience:

  • Pain on both sides or one side of the head
  • Pain is throbbing in nature
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Sensitivity to smells, sound and light
  • Vision is blurred
  • Fainting and lightheadedness

Postdrome: This is the final phase of the migraine. During this phase one might feel fatigued, though some people feel euphoric.

Red flags that the patient may be having underlying serious disorder not migraine

  1. Onset of headaches >50 years 
  2. Thunderclap headache - subarachnoid haemorrhage 
  3. Neurological symptoms or signs 
  4. Meningism 
  5. Immunosuppression or malignancy 
  6. Red eye and haloes around lights - acute angle closure glaucoma 
  7. Worsening symptoms 
  8. Symptoms of temporal arteritis

These patients require CT scan / MRI or CSF examination. Most Migraine patients do not need these tests. 

Diagnosis of Migraine: Usually migraines go undiagnosed and thus are untreated. In case you experience the symptoms regularly then talk to the doctor, who evaluates the symptoms and can start a treatment. You can also be referred to a neurologist who is trained to treat the migraines and other conditions. During the appointment the neurologist usually asks about the family history of headaches and migraines along with your symptoms and medical history.

The doctor might advise for some tests like:

  1. Blood Tests: These reveal problems with the blood vessel like an infection in the spinal cord and brain.
  2. CT scan: Used to diagnose the infections, tumors, brain damage, and bleeding that cause the migraines.
  3. MRI: This helps to diagnose the tumors bleeding infections, neurological conditions, and strokes.
  4. Lumbar Puncture: For analyzing infections and neurological damages. In lumbar puncture a thin needle is inserted between the two vertebrae to remove a sample of the cerebrospinal fluid for analysis.

Treatments

Migraine treatments can help stop symptoms and prevent future attacks.

Many medications have been designed to treat migraines. Some drugs often used to treat other conditions also may help relieve or prevent migraines. Medications used to combat migraines fall into two broad categories:

  • Pain-relieving medications. Also known as acute or abortive treatment, these types of drugs are taken during migraine attacks and are designed to stop symptoms.
  • Preventive medications. These types of drugs are taken regularly, often on a daily basis, to reduce the severity or frequency of migraines.

Your treatment strategy depends on the frequency and severity of your headaches, the degree of disability your headaches cause, and your other medical conditions.

Some medications aren't recommended if you're pregnant or breast-feeding. Some medications aren't given to children. Your doctor can help find the right medication for you.

2 people found this helpful

What You Need To Know About Brain Stroke?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
What You Need To Know About Brain Stroke?

A brain stroke can affect anyone at any point of time when the supply of blood to the brain is interrupted. It can threaten major physical functions and can prove to be fatally dangerous at times. The brain stem which is placed right above the spinal cord controls the breathing, heartbeat and levels of blood pressure. It is also in charge of controlling some elementary functions such as swallowing, hearing, speech and eye movements.

What are the different types of strokes?
There are three main kinds of stroke: ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes and transient ischemic attacks. The most common type of brain stroke is the ischemic stroke is caused by narrowing or blocking of arteries to the brain, which prevents the proper supply of blood to the brain. Sometimes it so happens that the blood clot that has formed elsewhere in the body have travelled via the blood vessels and has been trapped in the blood vessel which provides blood to the brain. When the supply of blood to a part of the brain is hindered, the tissue in that area dies off owing to lack of oxygen. The other variant of brain stroke is termed as hemorrhagic stroke is caused when the blood vessels in and around the brain burst or leak. Strokes need to be diagnosed and treated as quickly as possible in order to minimize brain damage.  Remembering the F.A.S.T. acronym can help with recognizing the onset of stroke (Face, Arms, Speed, Time - explained below). 

What are the common symptoms of a brain stroke?
The symptoms of the brain stroke are largely dependent on the area of the brain that has been affected. It can interfere with normal functioning, such as breathing and talking and other functions which human beings can perform without thinking such as eye movements or swallowing. Since all the signals from the brain as well as other parts of the body traverse through the brain stem, the interruption of blood flow often leads to numbness or paralysis in different parts of the body.

Who is likely to have a stroke?
Anyone is at a risk of developing brain stroke although ageing is directly proportional to the risk of having a stroke. Not only that an individual with a family history of brain stroke or transient ischemic attack is at a higher risk of developing stroke. People who have aged over 65 accounts for about 33 percent of all brain strokes. It is important to point here that individuals with high blood pressure, high blood sugar, cholesterol, cancer, autoimmune diseases and some blood disorders are at a higher risk of developing brain stroke.

There are a few factors which can increase the risk of developing stroke beyond any control. But there are certain lifestyle choices as well which aids in controlling the chances of being affected by stroke. It is crucial to refrain from long-term hormone replacement therapies as well as birth control pills, smoking, lack of physical activity, excessive use of alcohol and drug addiction. A brain stroke is a life-threatening medical condition, and when an individual has symptoms that resemble that of stroke, it is crucial to seek immediate medical help.

Treatment for stroke

  1. Treatment depends on the type of stroke.
  2. Ischemic strokes can be treated with 'clot-busting' drugs.
  3. Hemorrhagic strokes can be treated with surgery to repair or block blood vessel weaknesses.
  4. The most effective way to prevent strokes is through maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

What is TPA?
TPA is a thrombolytic or a “Clot Buster” drug. This clot buster is used to break-up the clot that is causing a blockage or disruption in the flow of blood to the brain and helps restore the blood flow to the area of the brain. It is given by intravenous (IV). This can be given only within 4.5 hrs of the onset of symptoms

Time is brain

  1. Remember Every second Loss means brain cells die.
  2. Rush to the nearest Stroke Centre whenever you experience such symptoms.
  3. U can save the brain cells dying if you reach within 4.5 hrs by the CLOT BUSTER. 

Endovascular procedures 
Another treatment option is an endovascular procedure* called mechanical thrombectomy, strongly recommended, in which  trained doctors try  removing a large blood clot by  sending a wired-caged device called a stent retriever, to the site of the blocked blood vessel in the brain

Stroke prevention
The good news is that 80 percent of all strokes are preventable. It starts with managing key risk factors, including 

  1. High blood pressure,
  2. Cigarette smoking,
  3. Diabetes
  4. Atrial fibrillation and
  5. Physical inactivity.
  6. More than half of all strokes are caused by uncontrolled hypertension or high blood pressure, making it the most important risk factor to control. 

Rehabilitation
The best way to get better after a stroke is to start stroke rehabilitation ("rehab"). In stroke rehab, a team of health professionals works with you to regain skills you lost as the result of a stroke.

3 people found this helpful

Risk Factors of Brain Tumor!

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Risk Factors of Brain Tumor!

There is no trustworthy evidence regarding what causes brain tumors, but there are a few risk factors that have been substantiated through research. Children and young people who receive radiation around the head are susceptible to developing tumors in the brain once they grow up. Also, people with a certain kind of rare genetic condition like neurofibromatosis may develop a brain tumor though such cases are very few in number. Age is also an important factor as people aged over 65 years are diagnosed with brain tumors at quadruple times higher than children and younger people.

Types of Brain Tumours:

A primary brain tumor originates in the brain, and they may or may not be cancerous. Some tumors can be benign, which do not spread in the surrounding tissues and are not very malicious. However, that does not signify that they will not cause any harm over time. Sometimes these tumors can be severe and cause a threat to the life of the sufferer. The National Cancer Institute reports that approximately there were 23, 380 fresh cases of brain tumors in 2014.

Identifying the Symptoms of Brain Tumors:

The symptoms of the brain tumor are dependent on various factors such as the size, type as well as the exact location of the tumor. These symptoms are triggered when any tumor is pressed or clashed against a nerve or disturbs a part of the brain. Symptoms are also felt when any tumor particle blocks the fluid flowing around the brain or when there is a swelling in the brain owing to the build-up of fluid.

Common symptoms include: headaches that get worse in the morning, nausea along with vomiting, an alteration in the speech, hearing and imbalances in walking and movement, mood swings, change in personality and ability to concentrate or remember things and seizures or convulsions.

Treatment for Brain Tumor:

Surgery is normally the most usual treatment for brain tumors, and the patient is given anesthesia, and the scalp is shaved before the surgery. Then, craniotomy is performed to open the skull, and the surgeon removes a bone piece out of the skull. Then the tumor is removed as much as possible. The bone is then restored back, and the incision on the scalp is closed. Sometimes surgery is not viable in case the tumor has developed in the brain stem or some other complex parts.

Neurosurgeons can surgically remove some tumors completely (called resection or complete removal). If the tumor is near sensitive areas of the brain, neurosurgeons will only be able to remove part of it (called partial removal). Even partial removals can relieve symptoms and facilitate or increase the effectiveness of other treatments.

The role of surgery in treating brain tumors:

Surgery can provide:

  • The complete removal of some brain tumors
  • A sample to enable doctors to diagnosis the tumor and recommend the most appropriate treatment
  • Better quality of life:
    • Reduced symptoms and improved ability to function (e.g., to think, speak or see better)
    • Less pressure within the skull from the tumor
    • A longer life

In case you or any of your near ones is affected with brain tumor, you should visit the doctor to know the possible treatments other than surgery and other important questions related to brain tumor.

1 person found this helpful

Does a Bigger Brain Make You Smarter When It Comes To Intelligence?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Does a Bigger Brain Make You Smarter When It Comes To Intelligence?

When it comes to the brain and the IQ, is bigger the better? Does size really matter? Is there really a connection between the size of your brain and intelligence? With the help of findings by neurologists 
and scientists, we seek to find out!

  1. Ailments and the Brain: Scientists have found that children with autism have a brain that has grown in a disproportionate manner in the very first year of their life. This prevents the child from making connections with normal behaviour. On the other hand, children and adolescents who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder or ADHD have shown signs of having a much smaller brain size. Many scientists have shown that the size of the brain shrinks as we age, and this does not have any visible effect on our cognitive abilities.
  2. It's all Relative: The size of the brain does not really have a bearing on the way a person's cognition gets shaped. Even large mammals like elephants and whales are finally hunted and tamed by humans who have smaller brains in comparison. The brain is made up of billions of neurons which need to function properly. It may be seen that scientists consider the brain mass in relation with the rest of the body so as to speculate about the cognitive abilities of the person. Why is this required? Large animals need a well functioning and proportionate brain size to control and run their organs with proper cognition for satisfactory results, which is what we humans seem to have done.
  3. Neanderthal Brains: Historically, the earliest man or the Neanderthals are said to have had larger brains than we do. These people are believed to have brains that are at least 10% larger than the brains that we have in our modern times. The shape of their brain was different too. They were also heavily muscled people which had a bearing on the size and shape of the brain and bodies as well as the lean tissue within the brain. They also survived very successfully for a period of over 200,000 years, which obviously points to some form of elevated cognition, as per many scientists.
  4. Animals: While animals with small brains like lizards and reptiles do not perform too well on IQ tests, the animals with bigger brains like elephants and dolphins perform much better. But the medium sized brains of monkeys, lemurs and other animals are said to perform in the best manner. The correlation between the body size and the brain does not seem to hold good here, as per various researches.

So the verdict as per medical science and research stands divided!

1 person found this helpful

Epilepsy: What Should You Know?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Epilepsy: What Should You Know?

Epilepsy is a neurological disease which is characterised by recurring epileptic seizures. These seizures can be brief or can persist for prolonged periods. Vigorous episodes which last long can result in physical injuries such as broken bones. Mention that 6th February is International epilepsy day.

Causes of Epilepsy
The cause of this condition isn’t very evident; however, most medical practitioners attribute epileptic seizures to brain injury, tumours, infections in the brain or birth defects. Some doctors believe that epilepsy is caused due to genetic mutations and is an outcome of abnormal activity of cells in the brain. Other causes for this condition can be alcohol or narcotics withdrawal and electrolyte problems.

Symptoms

  1. Repeated seizures
  2. Impaired memory
  3. Bouts of fainting
  4. Short spans of blackout
  5. Sudden bouts of blinking and chewing
  6. Panic
  7. Inappropriate repetitive movements

Types of Seizures
A seizure, also known as fit, is usually a brief episode characterised by uncontrollable jerking movement and loss of awareness due to abnormal neuronal activity in your brain. A collective occurrence of these seizures causes epilepsy.

There are three types of seizures an epileptic person usually encounters.

  1. Idiopathic: This kind of seizure has no apparent cause
  2. Cryptogenic: The doctors believe that there is a cause for the seizure but cannot detect it
  3. Symptomatic: These seizures occur due to a reason.

Treatments

  1. Medication: Medication is the most common treatment in case of epilepsy. Drugs taken on a regular basis can stop the seizure partially. But in very severe cases, they seem to have no effect at all.
  2. Surgery: For symptomatic seizures which are caused due to abnormal brain function, surgery can be a way to get rid of seizures. In some minor cases, nerve stimulation in the brain and special diets can be prescribed to control the epileptic seizures.

Five facts about epilepsy you need to know:

  • Epilepsy is not psychosis or madness and can be treated easily 
  • Popular celebraties with epilepsy include Aristotle, Alfred Nobel, Alexander the great, Sir Isaacs Newton, Martin Luther and Julius Caesar etc. 
  • Woman with epilepsy can have a normal pregnancy 
  • Newer medicines for epilepsy are effective and very safe 
  • Surgery can cure epilepsy in some patients. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Neurologist.
1914 people found this helpful

I easily forget anything. If you give me any work definatly I will forget it. I am confuse at this time. Am I suffering from any disease?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Dementia, depression, hypothyroidism, vitamin b12 deficiency, poor concentration, poor sleep. Any of these can cause memory impairment.
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My mother was suffering from brain tumor and after the operation tumor was in grade 1 according to the biopsy report and operation has done in 2013 and after the operation two times mri has conducted and according to the mri report tumor was not increased. My first query is that if the tumor is in grade 1 that will be permanently cured or not. And if it is not permanently cured then what is chances or how long patient will be survived.

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Grade 1 tumor is relatively less aggressive. If the tumor was completely removed during the surgery and there was no recurrence even after 2 years, it is less likely to be a problem in the future. However you have to be vigilant and have regular follow up with your Neurologist.
1 person found this helpful
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My wife is having Parkinsons. No trembling but stiffness in muscle, difficulty in walking, speech, writing. Taking treatment with syndopa 900 mg/daily for the past six years. What is your suggestion to get relief / improvement . Siddha, Ayurvedic, homeopathy or any alternate treatment is ok ?

DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Neurologist, Chennai
Syndopa is the best medicine available for Parkinson's disease. However the dosing and dosage interval should be individualized based on the need. Even improper dosing and dosage interval may produce poor control. Also there are many other drugs available which could helpful if added to Syndopa judiciously. There is a surgical procedure called DBS is available which can give better result in carefully selected patients.
1 person found this helpful
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