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Dr. Pankaj Kochar

BVSc

Veterinarian, Chandigarh

16 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
Dr. Pankaj Kochar BVSc Veterinarian, Chandigarh
16 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Pankaj Kochar
Dr. Pankaj Kochar is a popular Veterinarian in Sector 21, Chandigarh. He has helped numerous patients in his 16 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He has done BVSc . You can meet Dr. Pankaj Kochar personally at Pet Mart Clinic in Sector 21, Chandigarh. Book an appointment online with Dr. Pankaj Kochar on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Chandigarh and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVSc - Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences - 2001
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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House Number- 1155, Sector-21 BChandigarh Get Directions
200 at clinic
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I think my dog have an ear infection. What should i do? and he does not let me touch his ear.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Ear infection is painful so u hv to show to vet so he will put muzzle or under sedation he will clean ear and tell proper medicine
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Mai bhopal se hu. and meri female dog hai. Jo Abhi 12 days ho gye hai use cross huye To kya use puppy na ho aisa koi injection hai ?Jisse use koi nukasan na ho. please advise.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
You can have tablets for it from the receptive days on wards . But it has all the side effects i would suggest you to go for one breeding and surgically remove the uterus . With a vet surgeon
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What can I do if my dogs fever is too high? Will benadryl help lower a fever? And I am not feeling well when I ate some oil pieces.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
What can I do if my dogs fever is too high? Will benadryl help lower a fever?
And I am not feeling well when I ate so...
Benadryl will not help lowering temp. You should take your pet to vet, because high fever is because of different reason like heat stroke, tick fever, infection etc.
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deploma Veterinary
Veterinarian,
In summer maintain your pet tem. And give them lots of water and give bath 2 time with look warm water not to hot and use anti fungal soap for bath.
10 people found this helpful

Pl. Suggest is it true for a german shepherd breed that they should not sit on floor like tiles which can get them bad or deformed legs as such my dog just one month of age prefers to sit only on tiles,it never sits on dari or other mats.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
True as they could not balance a slippery floor . because they have paws as there foot it needs rough surface to have a grip so please try to avoid the tile flooring as much as possible
2 people found this helpful
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

How many times to feed a stray dog? n what food to feed exactly so that they get all the nutrients they need?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Feed twice with dog food available in the market at the rate of 300 gms in the morning and 200 in the evening . foods like pedigree, rc, hills, drools, smart heart , farmina , chickopee,etc a lot ranges available
2 people found this helpful
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My German shepherd aged about 5 years is not having food expect in evening. Today my mom gave him bath and noticed that on left ear edge a area about half a inch is swelling which seems like if some water like substance is in it. Also upper part of left eye is in same condition. Kindly help me in this regard with some effective medicines. Regards

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Most shephards tend to eat once that too in the evenings, especially in summers. The ear thing you mentioned could be Aural hematoma, and the water like swelling could be accumulation of unclotted blood. Kindly visit your vet and explore treatment options. It can vary form puncturing the swelling and drain contents (a recurrent procedure), to surgical correction (depends on how extensive it is) or Homeopathy meds to reduce recurrence. Take care.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.
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My 2 month old labrador puppy is detected with canine distemper. Please tell me the cure and treatment for this disease.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Can use some poultry vaccine in initial stage to cure but if crosses stages can not do anything but still can maintain it.
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

My pet 6 months old golden retriever in fed on golden retriever junior royal canin and the vet has suggested some human supplements like feroglobin and calicmax is it safe for him ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Yes its safe , even the human can have the tablets when its safe to the animals . So dont worry . I use nearly 95 % of medicine in human field only . And regarding dosage please consult your vet in supplementing it.
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Hi doctor, I have a german shepherd of one and half year old. It is so agressive and barks a lot. We have received complaint from our neighbour regarding this. I just wanted to know is there any injection for dogs to reduce the aggressiveness and not to bark a lot. because I have heard there is a injection for dogs to become calm.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
It is a behavioural problem treat the dogs with extra love and affection train him to become calm and avoid undue entry of strangers whole time in dogs area and do not apply force to tackle the problem. Be more friendly and try to play with your dog avoid medication to solely treat this condition
4 people found this helpful
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My friend is a female dane about 2 years old and I couldn't find a proper male for her to mate is there any other way that she can have puppies ?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
U can do artificial insemination but for that also required male or u can bring semen from chennai vet colleges
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I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a day. But from yesterday onwards he's suffering from loose motions. What should I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a ...
Hi lybrate-user, stop feeding your pug with cerelac. Give cold milk or butter milk what ever it likes, provide more water. Give rest for 2-3 days. Do not force him to eat for 2-3 days. Problem will solve.
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I have a labrador retriever at home.He is 1 years 9 months old.The problem is that he sheds a lot of hair nearly throughout the year.I applied dandruff relieving shampoo on him but that too did not work.Please help

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Then you have problem in diet management . First rule out that they dont have any skin problem . Then substitute with omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acid tonic available in the market either human preparation or vet preparation.
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My female labrador, aged 9 years was diagnosed with diabetes which is now under control, but she has lost her vision due to a milky blue layer formation on the lens. Is it curable by surgery? What are the side effects post surgery?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
No side effects. Get her eyes operated soon. Looks like a cataract. If you delay the vision may never come back.
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