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Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli  - Dermatologist, Chandigarh

Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli

87 (162 ratings)
MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology

Dermatologist, Chandigarh

11 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli 87% (162 ratings) MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology Dermatologist, Chandigarh
11 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹300 online
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Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli
Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli is a trusted Dermatologist in Sector 36-C, Chandigarh. He has been a practicing Dermatologist for 11 years. He has completed MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology . He is currently practising at Agelock Skin Clinic in Sector 36-C, Chandigarh. Book an appointment online with Dr. Jagatjit Singh Kohli and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted Dermatologists from across India. You will find Dermatologists with more than 44 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Dermatologists online in Chandigarh. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MBBS - Government Medical College Patiala - 2006
DHMS-Harvard - Harvard University - 2013
Masters in Clinical Dermatology - Government Medical College, Patiala(Punjab) - 2008
Past Experience
Senior Consultant at Agelock Skin clinic
Dermatologist at Chandigarh Medical Corporation
Tricologist at Vishwas hospital
...more
Internship at Government Medical College, Patiala
Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Punjabi
Awards and Recognitions
IMA-Life Membership
Professional Memberships
Indian Medical Association (IMA)
Punjab Medical Council

Location

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Agelock Skin Clinic

1107, Level I, Landmark : Near Police Station, Opp. DSOIChandigarh Get Directions
  4.4  (162 ratings)
500 at clinic
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Patient Review Highlights

"Very helpful" 6 reviews "Thorough" 1 review "Inspiring" 1 review "Practical" 2 reviews "knowledgeable" 2 reviews "Helped me impr..." 1 review "Caring" 3 reviews "Professional" 1 review "Well-reasoned" 1 review

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My facial is bit oily due to which sometimes pimple develop. Suggest me best face wash to get clear, spotless and fairer face?

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
My facial is bit oily due to which sometimes pimple develop. Suggest me best face wash to get clear, spotless and fai...
Only face wash wouldn't work. You will have to use something more. Get in touch with me over video consult and I can guide you.
2 people found this helpful
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Hairloss: An Epidemic

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Hairloss: An Epidemic

Hair loss can affect just your scalp or your entire body. Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. This usually doesn't cause noticeable thinning of scalp hair because new hair is growing in at the same time. Hair loss occurs when this cycle of hair growth and shedding is disrupted or when the hair follicle is destroyed and replaced with scar tissue.

The exact cause of hair loss may not be fully understood, but it's usually related to one or more of the following factors:

  • Family history (heredity)
  • Hormonal changes
  • Medical conditions
  • Medications

Family history (heredity)

The most common cause of hair loss is a hereditary condition called male-pattern baldness or female-pattern baldness. It usually occurs gradually and in predictable patterns — a receding hairline and bald spots in men and thinning hair in women.

Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair, the rate of hair loss and the extent of baldness. Pattern baldness is most common in men and can begin as early as puberty. This type of hair loss may involve both hair thinning and miniaturization (hair becomes soft, fine and short).

Hormonal changes and medical conditions

A variety of conditions can cause hair loss, including:

  • Hormonal changes. Hormonal changes and imbalances can cause temporary hair loss. This could be due to pregnancy, childbirth or the onset of menopause. Hormone levels are also affected by the thyroid gland, so thyroid problems may cause hair loss.
  • Patchy hair loss. This type of nonscarring hair loss is called alopecia areata (al-o-PEE-she-uh ar-e-A-tuh). It occurs when the body's immune system attacks hair follicles — causing sudden hair loss that leaves smooth, roundish bald patches on the skin.
  • Scalp infections. Infections, such as ringworm, can invade the hair and skin of your scalp, leading to scaly patches and hair loss. Once infections are treated, hair generally grows back.
  • Other skin disorders. Diseases that cause scarring alopecia may result in permanent loss at the scarred areas. These conditions include lichen planus, some types of lupus and sarcoidosis.
  • Hair-pulling disorder. This condition, also called trichotillomania (trik-o-til-o-MAY-nee-uh), causes people to have an irresistible urge to pull out their hair, whether it's from the scalp, the eyebrows or other areas of the body.

Medications

Hair loss can be caused by drugs used for cancer, arthritis, depression, heart problems, high blood pressure and birth control. Intake of too much vitamin A may cause hair loss as well.

Other causes of hair loss

Hair loss can also result from:

  • Radiation therapy to the head. The hair may not grow back the same as it was before.
  • A trigger event. Many people experience a general thinning of hair several months after a physical or emotional shock. This type of hair loss is temporary. Examples of trigger events include sudden or excessive weight loss, a high fever, surgery, or a death in the family.
  • Certain hairstyles and treatments. Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair tight, such as pigtails or cornrows, can cause traction alopecia. Hot oil hair treatments and permanents can cause inflammation of hair follicles that leads to hair loss. If scarring occurs, hair loss could be permanent.

A number of factors can increase your risk of hair loss, including:

  • Family history
  • Age
  • Poor nutrition
  • Certain medical conditions, such as diabetes and lupus
  • Stress

You can stop or even reverse hair loss with aggressive treatment, especially if it’s due to an underlying medical condition. Hereditary hair loss may be more difficult to treat, but certain procedures such as hair transplants can help reduce the appearance of baldness. Talk to your doctor to explore all your options to lessen the effects of hair loss.

Hi, Can you suggest me some natural tips to remove sun tan on the face and neck. Thanks, pani.

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Hi,
Can you suggest me some natural tips to remove sun tan on the face and neck.
Thanks,
pani.
Use lemon juice on face for 1 min and then wash it. I can send you a mask that you have to apply afterwards. Regards.
1 person found this helpful
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Herpes Zoster

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Herpes Zoster

Herpes zoster or Shingles is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. Although shingles can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

Shingles is caused by the varicella-zoster virus — the same virus that causes chickenpox. After you've had chickenpox, the virus lies inactive in nerve tissue near your spinal cord and brain. Years later, the virus may reactivate as shingles.

While it isn't a life-threatening condition, shingles can be very painful. Vaccines can help reduce the risk of shingles, while early treatment can help shorten a shingles infection and lessen the chance of complications.

Symptoms

The signs and symptoms of shingles usually affect only a small section of one side of your body. These signs and symptoms may include:

  • Pain, burning, numbness or tingling
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • A red rash that begins a few days after the pain
  • Fluid-filled blisters that break open and crust over
  • Itching

Some people also experience:

Pain is usually the first symptom of shingles. For some, it can be intense. Depending on the location of the pain, it can sometimes be mistaken for a symptom of problems affecting the heart, lungs or kidneys. Some people experience shingles pain without ever developing the rash.

Most commonly, the shingles rash develops as a stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or right side of your torso. Sometimes the shingles rash occurs around one eye or on one side of the neck or face.

Treatment

There's no cure for shingles, but prompt treatment with prescription antiviral drugs can speed healing and reduce your risk of complications. These medications include:

  • Acyclovir
  • Valacyclovir 

Shingles can cause severe pain, so your doctor also may prescribe:

  • Capsaicin topical patch
  • Anticonvulsants, such as gabapentin
  • Tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline
  • Numbing agents, such as lidocaine, delivered via a cream, gel, spray or skin patch
  • Medications that contain narcotics, such as codeine
  • An injection including corticosteroids and local anesthetics

Shingles generally lasts between two and six weeks. Most people get shingles only once, but it is possible to get it two or more times.

2 people found this helpful

I want to do full body hair removal Is it good to do laser treatment or full body waxing?

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
I want to do full body hair removal
Is it good to do laser treatment or full body waxing?
Getting laser is better as waxing may cause ingrown hair. If you want to know more about it please feel free to contact me. Regards.
3 people found this helpful
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Helo Dr. My name is divynash ,I m suffering from hair loss problem since 8 standard, now I am 22 years old and hair continue loss still. So how I get my hair regrowth by diet and type of good food .please tell me what type of food and diet I take.

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Helo Dr. My name is divynash ,I m suffering from hair loss problem since 8 standard, now I am 22 years old and hair c...
If this problem persists you may go bald in a year. Our priority is to stop the hair loss and the thicken your hair. If you need my help I will be happy to help. Regards.
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TCA - Trichloroacetic Acid Peel

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
TCA - Trichloroacetic Acid Peel

A Form of Resurfacing: The TCA (trichloroacetic acid) peel is one of the oldest forms of skin resurfacing. Skin resurfacing refers to use of an agent or device to remove layers of skin, thereby allowing newer, refreshed skin to grow in its place. Dermabrasion and lasers are also used for skin resurfacing. Chemical peels such as TCA and phenol have been around for many years and have a long track record of success.

A TCA peel can be used as a mild, medium, or deep chemical formulation; this relates to the depth of penetration of the acid. The depth of penetration correlates to the percentage of TCA in the solution. In my hands, a medium depth TCA peel (35%) is usually used. Prior to application of the TCA, I use a light chemical peel known as the Jessner's peel, which is salicylic acid based. This cleans epidermal cells down to the layer of the stratum corneum, allowing the TCA to penetrate more deeply and more evenly.

Safety: Is a TCA peel safe. The answer is yes if used by an experienced Physician; it is a serious treatment and requires a practitioner with superb training and experience. TCA penetrates the skin via a process known as coagulative necrosis; it can only penetrate to a specified depth based on its concentration. The key is to make sure the peel is formulated correctly. Most Facial Plastic Surgeons will have a Pharmacist who formulates the peel in a consistent, specified fashion.

Downtime: Much less downtime than a CO2 laser treatment, but more downtime than a Dermabrasion or a Portrait Plasma Skin Regeneration (PSR); there is a week of initial recovery followed by moderate redness for 4 weeks or so. However, since TCA is relatively inexpensive to formulate, it gives a great result for less patient cost than most of the other treatments mentioned.

Conclusion: TCA chemical peel is a treatment I have always used in my practice as part of the armementarium of skin resurfacing, and something I will probably continue to use based on the consistency of results, acceptable downtime, and cost factors involved.

5 people found this helpful

Lichen Planus - What You Should Know?

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Lichen Planus - What You Should Know?

The skin is the most exposed organ to irritants, and when the body recognizes something as foreign, the immune system kicks into action. It produces what is known as antibodies against the foreign bodies (antigens). However, in many situations, the body produces antibodies against its own cells or tissue or components, causing an autoimmune reaction. One such autoimmune reaction is lichen planus, which is a skin rash caused when the body produces antibodies against its own skin or mucous membranes.

Risk factors: While anyone with a weak immune system can develop lichen planus, the followings increase the chances of that happening:

  1. Presence of other autoimmune disorders
  2. Hyperactive immune system, causing the allergic reaction
  3. Genetic inheritance
  4. Increased stress levels
  5. Prior history of viral infections
  6. Middle aged women
  7. Exposure to allergens like gold, arsenic, iodine, and drugs like diuretics and antibiotics
  8. Prior history of hepatitis C

Symptoms: Diagnosis of lichen planus is quite easy, as it has a characteristic appearance.

  1. Basically, a skin rash that is purple in color with flat tops on the skin
  2. Rashes spread over the body in a matter of weeks
  3. They are itchy, painful, and produce a burning sensation
  4. Could have blisters which burst
  5. Have thin lacy margin
  6. Can be seen in the genital area, scalp, ankle, hands, mucous membranes, and nails

If required, a biopsy can be done in some cases to confirm the diagnosis. Allergy testing can also be done to confirm hyperactive immune system.

Treatments: This can depend on the severity of the condition. In people where it is not progressive or inflamed, it could be observed to run its natural course and subside.

For those requiring symptomatic treatment, the following can be used:

  1. Steroids (topical or oral) to reduce inflammation
  2. Antihistamines to reduce the allergic response
  3. Retinoids (topical or oral) which can help overall skin health
  4. Nonsteroidal creams to clear up the rash
  5. Moisturizer to keep skin healthy and prevent dryness and itching
  6. Cool compresses on the rashes
  7. Loose clothing to prevent irritation and itching
  8. Anti-itch creams and powders and lotions
  9. Oatmeal bath to avoid itching and inflammation
  10. Ultraviolet radiation to the rash to reduce severity
  11. Avoid agents (drugs or chemicals) which can cause lichen planus
  12. If the lesions are in the mouth, mouthwash and/or rinse can be used for topical relief

Lichen planus often does not require any treatment. However, depending on each individual, it may require topical and/or systemic treatment to manage the symptoms. It usually runs its course over 6 to 10 weeks and subsides on its own. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Dermatologist.

2407 people found this helpful

Know More About Melasma!

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Know More About Melasma!

What is melasma?

Melasma  is a common skin problem. It is a chronic skin disorder that results in symmetrical, blotchy, brownish facial pigmentation

It causes brown to gray-brown patches, usually on the face. Most people get it on their cheeks, bridge of their nose, forehead, chin, and above their upper lip. It also can appear on other parts of the body that get lots of sun, such as the forearms and neck.

The exact cause is not known, but several factors contribute. These include pregnancy, hormonal drugs such as the contraceptive pill, and very occasionally medical conditions affecting hormone levels. Some cosmetics, especially those containing perfume, can bring on melasma. There is research to suggest that it can be triggered by stress. Sunshine and the use of sun-beds usually worsen any tendency to melasma.

Melasma presents as macules (freckle-like spots) and larger flat brown patches.These are found on both sides of the face and have an irregular border. There are several distinct patterns.

  • Centrofacial pattern: forehead, cheeks, nose and upper lips
  • Malar pattern: cheeks and nose
  • Lateral cheek pattern
  • Mandibular pattern: jawline
  • Reddened or inflamed forms of melasma (also called erythrosis pigmentosa faciei)
  • Poikiloderma of Civatte: reddened, photoaging changes seen on the sides of the neck, mostly affecting patients older than 50 years
  • Brachial type of melasma affecting shoulders and upper arms (also called acquired brachial cutaneous dyschromatosis).

 

Known triggers for melasma include:

  • Sun exposure and sun damage—this is the most important avoidable risk factor
  • Pregnancy—in affected women, the pigment often fades a few months after delivery
  • Hormone treatments—oral contraceptive pills containing oestrogen and/or progesterone, hormone replacement, intrauterine devices and implants are a factor in about a quarter of affected women
  • Certain medications (including new targeted therapies for cancer), scented or deodorant soaps, toiletries and cosmetics—these may cause a phototoxic reaction that triggers melasma, which may then persist long term
  • Hypothyroidism (low levels of circulating thyroid hormone)

 

One of the most common treatments for melasma is sun protection. This means wearing sunscreen every day and reapplying the sunscreen every 2 hours. Dermatologists also recommend wearing a wide-brimmed hat when you are outside. Sunscreen alone may not give you the protection you need.

Women are far more likely than men to get melasma. It is so common during pregnancy that melasma is sometimes called "the mask of pregnancy." Hormones seem to trigger melasma. People with darker skin, such as those of Latin/Hispanic, North African, African-American, Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, or Mediterranean descent are more likely to get melasma. People who have a blood relative who had melasma also are much more likely to get melasma.

Melasma can run in families, suggesting an inherited tendency.

Melasma is usually easily recognised by the characteristics of the pigmentation and its distribution on the face. Occasionally, your dermatologist may suggest that a small sample of skin (numbed by local anaesthetic) is removed for examination under the microscope (a biopsy) in order to exclude other diagnoses.Melasma can fade on its own. This usually happens when a trigger, such as a pregnancy or birth control pills, causes the melasma. When a woman delivers her baby or stops taking the birth control pills, melasma can fade.

Some people, however, have melasma for years — or even a lifetime. If the melasma does not go away or a woman wants to keep taking birth control pills, melasma treatments are available. These include:

  • Hydroquinone: This medicine is a common first treatment for melasma. It is applied to the skin and works by lightening the skin. You will find hydroquinone in medicine that comes as a cream, lotion, gel, or liquid. You can get some of these without a prescription. These products contain less hydroquinone than a product that your dermatologist can prescribe.
  • Tretinoin and corticosteroids: To enhance skin lightening, your dermatologist may prescribe a second medicine. This medicine may be tretinoin or a corticosteroid. Sometimes a medicine contains 3 medicines (hydroquinone, tretinoin, and a corticosteroid) in 1 cream. This is often called a triple cream.
  • Other topical (applied to the skin) medicines: Doctors may prescribe azelaic acid or kojic acid to help lighten melasma.
  • Procedures: If medicine you apply to your skin does not get rid of your melasma, a procedure may succeed. Procedures for melasma include a chemical peel, microdermabrasion, dermabrasion, laser treatment, or a light-based procedure. Only a dermatologist should perform these procedures.

Results take time and the above measures are rarely completely successful.

Unfortunately, even in those that get a good result from treatment, pigmentation may reappear on exposure to summer sun and/or because of hormonal factors. New topical and oral agents are being studied and offer hope for effective treatments in the future.

 

All About Acne Vulgaris

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
All About Acne Vulgaris

Acne vulgaris is a common chronic skin disease involving blockage and/or inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland). Acne can present as noninflammatory lesions, inflammatory lesions, or a mixture of both, affecting mostly the face but also the back and chest.

Acne vulgaris has a multifactorial pathogenesis, of which the key factor is genetics. Acne develops as a result of an interplay of the following four factors: (1) follicular epidermal hyperproliferation with subsequent plugging of the follicle, (2) excess sebum production, (3) the presence and activity of the commensal bacteria Propionibacterium acnes, and (4) inflammation.

Acne occurs through the interplay of 4 major factors:

  • Excess sebum production
  • Follicular plugging with sebum and keratinocytes
  • Colonization of follicles by Propionibacterium acnes (a normal human anaerobe)
  • Release of multiple inflammatory mediators

The most common trigger is

  • Puberty

During puberty, surges in androgen stimulate sebum production and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes.

Other triggers include

  • Hormonal changes that occur with pregnancy or the menstrual cycle
  • Occlusive cosmetics, cleansers, lotions, and clothing
  • High humidity and sweating
  • Associations between acne exacerbation and diet, inadequate face washing, masturbation, and sex are unfounded. Some studies suggest a possible association with milk products and high-glycemic diets. Acne may abate in summer months because of sunlight’s anti-inflammatory effects. Proposed associations between acne and hyperinsulinism require further investigation. Some drugs and chemicals (eg, corticosteroids, lithium, phenytoin, isoniazid) worsen acne or cause acneiform eruptions.
  • Acne results in a variety of lesions. The most common acne locations include the face, neck, chest, and back, where the most sebaceous glands are located. Along the jaw line is a common location in adults. "Blackheads" (open comedones) and "whiteheads" (closed comedones) are follicular plugs that are either sitting below the skin surface (whitehead) or oxidized from being exposed to the air (blackhead). Papules are small pink to reddish-brown bumps, pustules are pus-filled lesions, and nodules or cysts are deeper pus-filled lesions.
  • Mild acne consists of a few papules/pustules and/or comedones. Moderate acne has an increased number of lesions. Severe acne has numerous comedones, papules, pustules, and may have painful nodules.
  • Acne can result in permanent scars, which can appear to be depressions in the skin or hyperpigmentation, which is dark red or brown flat marks where the acne lesions were.

Treatment

  • Comedones: Topical tretinoin
  • Mild inflammatory acne: Topical retinoid alone or with a topical antibiotic, benzoyl peroxide, or both
  • Moderate acne: Oral antibiotic plus topical therapy as for mild acne
  • Severe acne: Oral isotretinoin
  • Cystic acne: Intralesional triamcinolone
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Know More About Melanoma!

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Know More About Melanoma!

Melanoma is a cancer that develops in melanocytes, the pigment cells present in the skin. It can be more serious than the other forms of skin cancer because it may spread to other parts of the body (metastasize) and cause serious illness and death. About 50,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed in the United States every year.

Because most melanomas occur on the skin where they can be seen, patients themselves are often the first to detect many melanomas. Early detection and diagnosis are crucial. Caught early, most melanomas can be cured with relatively minor surgery.

 

  • Moles, brown spots and growths on the skin are usually harmless but not always. Anyone who has more than 100 moles is at greater risk for melanoma. The first signs can appear in one or more atypical moles. That's why it's so important to get to know your skin very well and to recognize any changes in the moles on your body. Look for the ABCDE signs of melanoma, and if you see one or more, make an appointment with a physician immediately.
  • The benign mole, left, is not asymmetrical. If you draw a line through the middle, the two sides will match, meaning it is symmetrical. If you draw a line through the mole on the right, the two halves will not match, meaning it is asymmetrical, a warning sign for melanoma.
  • A benign mole has smooth, even borders, unlike melanomas. The borders of an early melanoma tend to be uneven. The edges may be scalloped or notched.
  • Most benign moles are all one color — often a single shade of brown. Having a variety of colors is another warning signal. A number of different shades of brown, tan or black could appear. A melanoma may also become red, white or blue.
  • Benign moles usually have a smaller diameter than malignant ones. Melanomas usually are larger in diameter than the eraser on your pencil tip (¼ inch or 6mm), but they may sometimes be smaller when first detected.
  • Common, benign moles look the same over time. Be on the alert when a mole starts to evolve or change in any way. When a mole is evolving, see a doctor. Any change — in size, shape, color, elevation, or another trait, or any new symptom such as bleeding, itching or crusting — points to danger.

Is hair transplant is working. What is the price? How long it is? M going to marry soon. And my hair was too less and my scalp shows.

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
Is hair transplant is working. What is the price? How long it is? M going to marry soon. And my hair was too less and...
There is a way of getting your hair back naturally. Process is called Mesotherapy. You can contact me to know the process and prognosis. Regards
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