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Ms. Surina Lall

Psychologist, Bangalore

Ms. Surina Lall Psychologist, Bangalore
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I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Ms. Surina Lall
Ms. Surina Lall is an experienced Psychologist in Old Madras Road, Bangalore. She is currently practising at Sampurna Clinic in Old Madras Road, Bangalore. Save your time and book an appointment online with Ms. Surina Lall on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Psychologists in India. You will find Psychologists with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychologists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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I am depressed from 3 years my thinking is negative I am very irritating when I think my past.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
I am depressed from 3 years my thinking is negative I am very irritating when I think my past.
Depression like any other illness is a disorder that needs treatmnet. I hope you must be under treatmnet from a good psychiatrist. However if your symptoms of depression still persist after 3 years, it is quite possible that you may need a revision of diagnosis. Consult your psychiatrist for the same. For any further queries you may consult me online.
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Symptoms and Causes of Depression

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
Symptoms and Causes of Depression

Although confused with natural and temporal feelings of grief or sadness, depression is not merely a weakness or something to be taken lightly. It is quite a serious issue and can last for long periods of time. 

Depression does not merely involve feelings of hopelessness, helplessness, and worthlessness, but is much more terrible and usually has a detrimental effect on your day-to-day functioning.

There are many different types of depression. These include:

1. Major depression
2. Bipolar depression
3. Psychotic depression
4. Chronic depression (even dysthymia)
5. Seasonal depression
6. Substance-induced depression
7. Postpartum depression
8. Double depression
9. Treatment-resistant depression
10. Secondary depression
11. Masked depression

Symptoms: Signs and symptoms of clinical depression can vary depending largely on how severe it is, how long it lasts and how often it comes into play, and differs from individual to individual. While some might experience but a few signs of depression, others might experience more. Here is a list of symptoms that might indicate that you may be suffering from depression:

1. Being depressed for most parts of the day, especially in the morning
2. Feeling guilty or worthless almost every day
3. More inclined towards pessimism
4. Insomnia or hypersomnia
5. Regular contemplations of death or suicide
6. Significant weight gains or weight loss
7. Appetite loss or overeating
8. Feelings of high fatigue and low energy levels almost every day
9. Indecisiveness or impaired focus and difficulty concentrating
10. Lack of interest in almost all daily activities or hobbies, including sexual activity
11. Irritability and restlessness
12. Cramps, headaches and digestive problems which persist even with treatment

Causes: Although the exact causes of depression have not been determined as of yet, depression may be caused by a combination of a number of factors:

1. Biological differences
2. Hormonal imbalances
3. Brain chemistry
4. Inherited traits or genetic disorders.

2742 people found this helpful

Hola! I have entered +1 medical. I really adore the joy of learning. But the coaching institution gives a lot of pressure. Everytime I have to go to the centre I feel some sort of a guilt, some sort of a pressure that does not let me go. How do I cope up? Is there some fault in me or my plans?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
Hola! I have entered +1 medical. I really adore the joy of learning. But the coaching institution gives a lot of pres...
I think that you have a strong, and may be a rigid conscience that can torment you if you do not comply with expectations. You must have picked it up from a home where values were respected and perhaps enforced. Now, while this is good and makes a very reliable person, its rigidity is its problem. You must learn to relax and accept that some things are not going to happen as they would be expected to, and that is okay. You must learn to become flexible and adapt quickly when things don't go as per expectations. We can be rigid with machines and to some extent even with animals but to be so tight about human beings is trying to put all of them into a straightjacket. You will only confine yourself and limit your growth by these restrictions.
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I have voice issue. My voice is not audible to people with required clarity. When do I speak. There is some background music. Which is high in volume. But words are not clear. I have to put lots of effort to make it audible. Wt can be the reason?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear user. Hereditery voice box problems lead to this issue. I suggest you to consult a speech therapist and speech therapist will be able to help you. Take care.
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Dear doctor please give me suggestion for how to stop smoking I need your help please sir.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
First of all you have made an excellent decision. Now stick to it and follow these recommendations: When quitting, you must take one day at a time; though you must give up all smoking at once, and promptly. If you look too far ahead you will get discouraged and will give up. If you sit and count the number of days you have given up, that will also focus too much on achievement. You must focus on the here and now, on that day to be precise. After all quitting is not that easy due to many factors. So even if you fail one day, you must try and try again. Very few people succeed in their first attempt. Your persistence will eventually pay off. The urge to discontinue is hampered by many factors but the worst of them is the conditioning. In fact these conditions can exist all through the day unlike other addictions. But your desire to want to stop is the most important factor. It is important to find out about the ill-effects of smoking to have a reason that alarms you about continuing in the habit. The information is really scary but true and you must remind yourself about this every day. The nicotine in tobacco smoke stimulates the heart beat to raise the blood pressure in no time at all. So you must avoid it like the plague: it is just very bad medicine for you. In fact it is highly toxic too. You will need to stop smoking or consuming any tobacco related items with immediate effect. You should start vigorous exercises, gradually increasing it over a period of time. Do deep breathing exercises every time you feel like smoking (try Yoga), and replace the oral urge with some healthy food substitute to satiate the need. You may also take hard candy or chewing gum. If the urge is too strong, then use nicotine gums and nicotine patches, for a little while until the smoking drive reduces, substantially. You may also join Smokers Anonymous in your city where the support is really extraordinary for like-minded people who are also in the same situation. Keep yourself occupied or engaged with interesting activities during the times when it is most tempting. Keep the company of non-smokers for some time i.e. at least for the first 21 days. Above all announce it to everyone that you have quit smoking. Here’s a piece of very good advice: even if you accidentally/willfully take a cigarette, it is not the end of the world – you can start the cessation all over again. You must persevere with the best support until you defeat this addiction. Counseling is very useful in the initial stages and when temptations are at their highest.
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I have huge memory problems. I can't remember things which I have done yesterday and whenever I tried to recall things. My head starts paining and I can't even concentrate on the present. It would be very nice if you could help me solve my memory problems.

PG Diploma in Emergency Medicine Services (PGDEMS), Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), MD - Alternate Medicine
Ayurveda, Ghaziabad
I have huge memory problems. I can't remember things which I have done yesterday and whenever I tried to recall thing...
Hi Take ½ glass of carrot juice + Add ½ glass of spinach juice + Mix well + Drink this juice. Take pranacharya no tens capsule 1_1 twice a day. 1-1 drop of cow ghee in both nostrils at night time before sleep.
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I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
I lose my lover last week and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Pls help me.
Hi there ~ Coping with Grief and Loss Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you're experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on. What is grief? Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief will be. You may associate grief with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including: Divorce or relationship breakup Loss of health Losing a job Loss of financial stability A miscarriage Retirement Death of a pet Loss of a cherished dream A loved one’s serious illness Loss of a friendship Loss of safety after a trauma Selling the family home The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family home, or retiring from a career you loved. Everyone grieves differently Grieving is a personal and highly individual experience. How you grieve depends on many factors, including your personality and coping style, your life experience, your faith, and the nature of the loss. The grieving process takes time. Healing happens gradually; it can’t be forced or hurried—and there is no “normal” timetable for grieving. Some people start to feel better in weeks or months. For others, the grieving process is measured in years. Whatever your grief experience, it’s important to be patient with yourself and allow the process to naturally unfold. Myths and facts about grief MYTH: The pain will go away faster if you ignore it. Fact: Trying to ignore your pain or keep it from surfacing will only make it worse in the long run. For real healing it is necessary to face your grief and actively deal with it. MYTH: It’s important to be “be strong” in the face of loss. Fact: Feeling sad, frightened, or lonely is a normal reaction to loss. Crying doesn’t mean you are weak. You don’t need to “protect” your family or friends by putting on a brave front. Showing your true feelings can help them and you. MYTH: If you don’t cry, it means you aren’t sorry about the loss. Fact: Crying is a normal response to sadness, but it’s not the only one. Those who don’t cry may feel the pain just as deeply as others. They may simply have other ways of showing it. MYTH: Grief should last about a year. Fact: There is no right or wrong time frame for grieving. How long it takes can differ from person to person. Source: Center for Grief and Healing Are there stages of grief? In 1969, psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross introduced what became known as the “five stages of grief.” These stages of grief were based on her studies of the feelings of patients facing terminal illness, but many people have generalized them to other types of negative life changes and losses, such as the death of a loved one or a break-up. The five stages of grief: Denial: “This can’t be happening to me.” Anger: “Why is this happening? Who is to blame?” Bargaining: “Make this not happen, and in return I will ____.” Depression: “I’m too sad to do anything.” Acceptance: “I’m at peace with what happened.” If you are experiencing any of these emotions following a loss, it may help to know that your reaction is natural and that you’ll heal in time. However, not everyone who grieves goes through all of these stages—and that’s okay. Contrary to popular belief, you do not have to go through each stage in order to heal. In fact, some people resolve their grief without going through any of these stages. And if you do go through these stages of grief, you probably won’t experience them in a neat, sequential order, so don’t worry about what you “should” be feeling or which stage you’re supposed to be in. Kübler-Ross herself never intended for these stages to be a rigid framework that applies to everyone who mourns. In her last book before her death in 2004, she said of the five stages of grief: “They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss, as there is no typical loss. Our grieving is as individual as our lives.” Grief can be a roller coaster Instead of a series of stages, we might also think of the grieving process as a roller coaster, full of ups and downs, highs and lows. Like many roller coasters, the ride tends to be rougher in the beginning, the lows may be deeper and longer. The difficult periods should become less intense and shorter as time goes by, but it takes time to work through a loss. Even years after a loss, especially at special events such as a family wedding or the birth of a child, we may still experience a strong sense of grief. Source: Hospice Foundation of America Common symptoms of grief While loss affects people in different ways, many experience the following symptoms when they’re grieving. Just remember that almost anything that you experience in the early stages of grief is normal—including feeling like you’re going crazy, feeling like you’re in a bad dream, or questioning your religious beliefs. Shock and disbelief – Right after a loss, it can be hard to accept what happened. You may feel numb, have trouble believing that the loss really happened, or even deny the truth. If someone you love has died, you may keep expecting him or her to show up, even though you know he or she is gone. Sadness – Profound sadness is probably the most universally experienced symptom of grief. You may have feelings of emptiness, despair, yearning, or deep loneliness. You may also cry a lot or feel emotionally unstable. Guilt – You may regret or feel guilty about things you did or didn’t say or do. You may also feel guilty about certain feelings (e.g. Feeling relieved when the person died after a long, difficult illness). After a death, you may even feel guilty for not doing something to prevent the death, even if there was nothing more you could have done. Anger – Even if the loss was nobody’s fault, you may feel angry and resentful. If you lost a loved one, you may be angry with yourself, God, the doctors, or even the person who died for abandoning you. You may feel the need to blame someone for the injustice that was done to you. Fear – A significant loss can trigger a host of worries and fears. You may feel anxious, helpless, or insecure. You may even have panic attacks. The death of a loved one can trigger fears about your own mortality, of facing life without that person, or the responsibilities you now face alone. Physical symptoms – We often think of grief as a strictly emotional process, but grief often involves physical problems, including fatigue, nausea, lowered immunity, weight loss or weight gain, aches and pains, and insomnia. Coping with grief and loss tip 1: Get support The single most important factor in healing from loss is having the support of other people. Even if you aren’t comfortable talking about your feelings under normal circumstances, it’s important to express them when you’re grieving. Sharing your loss makes the burden of grief easier to carry. Wherever the support comes from, accept it and do not grieve alone. Connecting to others will help you heal. Finding support after a loss Turn to friends and family members – Now is the time to lean on the people who care about you, even if you take pride in being strong and self-sufficient. Draw loved ones close, rather than avoiding them, and accept the assistance that’s offered. Oftentimes, people want to help but don’t know how, so tell them what you need—whether it’s a shoulder to cry on or help with funeral arrangements. Draw comfort from your faith – If you follow a religious tradition, embrace the comfort its mourning rituals can provide. Spiritual activities that are meaningful to you—such as praying, meditating, or going to church—can offer solace. If you’re questioning your faith in the wake of the loss, talk to a clergy member or others in your religious community. Join a support group – Grief can feel very lonely, even when you have loved ones around. Sharing your sorrow with others who have experienced similar losses can help. To find a bereavement support group in your area, contact local hospitals, hospices, funeral homes, and counseling centers. Talk to a therapist or grief counselor – If your grief feels like too much to bear, call a mental health professional with experience in grief counseling. An experienced therapist can help you work through intense emotions and overcome obstacles to your grieving. Coping with grief and loss tip 2: Take care of yourself When you’re grieving, it’s more important than ever to take care of yourself. The stress of a major loss can quickly deplete your energy and emotional reserves. Looking after your physical and emotional needs will help you get through this difficult time. Face your feelings. You can try to suppress your grief, but you can’t avoid it forever. In order to heal, you have to acknowledge the pain. Trying to avoid feelings of sadness and loss only prolongs the grieving process. Unresolved grief can also lead to complications such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and health problems. Express your feelings in a tangible or creative way. Write about your loss in a journal. If you’ve lost a loved one, write a letter saying the things you never got to say; make a scrapbook or photo album celebrating the person’s life; or get involved in a cause or organization that was important to him or her. Look after your physical health. The mind and body are connected. When you feel good physically, you’ll also feel better emotionally. Combat stress and fatigue by getting enough sleep, eating right, and exercising. Don’t use alcohol or drugs to numb the pain of grief or lift your mood artificially. Don’t let anyone tell you how to feel, and don’t tell yourself how to feel either. Your grief is your own, and no one else can tell you when it’s time to “move on” or “get over it.” Let yourself feel whatever you feel without embarrassment or judgment. It’s okay to be angry, to yell at the heavens, to cry or not to cry. It’s also okay to laugh, to find moments of joy, and to let go when you’re ready. Plan ahead for grief “triggers.” Anniversaries, holidays, and milestones can reawaken memories and feelings. Be prepared for an emotional wallop, and know that it’s completely normal. If you’re sharing a holiday or lifecycle event with other relatives, talk to them ahead of time about their expectations and agree on strategies to honor the person you loved. Using social media for support Memorial pages on Facebook and other social media sites have become popular ways to inform a wide audience of a loved one’s passing and to reach out for support. As well as allowing you to impart practical information, such as funeral plans, these pages allow friends and loved ones to post their own tributes or condolences. Reading such messages can often provide some comfort for those grieving the loss. Of course, posting sensitive content on social media has its risks as well. Memorial pages are often open to anyone with a Facebook account. This may encourage people who hardly knew the deceased to post well-meaning but inappropriate comments or advice. Worse, memorial pages can also attract internet trolls. There have been many well-publicized cases of strangers posting cruel or abusive messages on Facebook memorial pages. To gain some protection, you can opt to create a closed group on Facebook rather than a public page, which means people have to be approved by a group member before they can access the memorial. It’s also important to remember that while social media can be a useful tool for reaching out to others, it can’t replace the face-to-face connection and support you need at this time. When grief doesn’t go away It’s normal to feel sad, numb, or angry following a loss. But as time passes, these emotions should become less intense as you accept the loss and start to move forward. If you aren’t feeling better over time, or your grief is getting worse, it may be a sign that your grief has developed into a more serious problem, such as complicated grief or major depression. Complicated grief The sadness of losing someone you love never goes away completely, but it shouldn’t remain center stage. If the pain of the loss is so constant and severe that it keeps you from resuming your life, you may be suffering from a condition known as complicated grief. Complicated grief is like being stuck in an intense state of mourning. You may have trouble accepting the death long after it has occurred or be so preoccupied with the person who died that it disrupts your daily routine and undermines your other relationships. Symptoms of complicated grief include: Intense longing and yearning for the deceased Intrusive thoughts or images of your loved one Denial of the death or sense of disbelief Imagining that your loved one is alive Searching for the person in familiar places Avoiding things that remind you of your loved one Extreme anger or bitterness over the loss Feeling that life is empty or meaningless The difference between grief and depression Distinguishing between grief and clinical depression isn’t always easy as they share many symptoms, but there are ways to tell the difference. Remember, grief can be a roller coaster. It involves a wide variety of emotions and a mix of good and bad days. Even when you’re in the middle of the grieving process, you will have moments of pleasure or happiness. With depression, on the other hand, the feelings of emptiness and despair are constant. Other symptoms that suggest depression, not just grief: Intense, pervasive sense of guilt Thoughts of suicide or a preoccupation with dying Feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness Slow speech and body movements Inability to function at work, home, and/or school Seeing or hearing things that aren’t there Can antidepressants help grief? As a general rule, normal grief does not warrant the use of antidepressants. While medication may relieve some of the symptoms of grief, it cannot treat the cause, which is the loss itself. Furthermore, by numbing the pain that must be worked through eventually, antidepressants delay the mourning process. When to seek professional help for grief If you recognize any of the above symptoms of complicated grief or clinical depression, talk to a mental health professional right away. Left untreated, complicated grief and depression can lead to significant emotional damage, life-threatening health problems, and even suicide. But treatment can help you get better. Contact a grief counselor or professional therapist if you: Feel like life isn’t worth living Wish you had died with your loved one Blame yourself for the loss or for failing to prevent it Feel numb and disconnected from others for more than a few weeks Are having difficulty trusting others since your loss Are unable to perform your normal daily activities I hope this helps.
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My boyfriend broke up with me a month back. We broke up exactly 2 days after we went on a long distance. We both were very serious in the relationship. I had been fighting with him a lot for stupid reasons. I am so full of guilt and begged him to take me back. He has been refusing me constantly and says that he does not love me anymore and he has thought over his decisions again. I am tired of hearing all the advice from all kind of people. Grieve, start loving yourself, concentrate on work, pray, meditate, date other people etc. Nothing seems to be working for me. Please help.

M. D. Psychiatry, Diploma in Psychological Medicine-DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist,
Hello lybrate-user I understand you are currently going through emotional crisis. Life sometimes throw challenges which can be overwhelming. All I would say is take few days to first comfort yourself. It's never wise to take decisions in crisis. So just get yourself into other tasks which are easy to handle. If needed talk to professional counsellors. Only when you are back in your old frame of mind think about best way to deal with this issue.
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How to overcome of smoking habits? He is taking six cigarettes in a day some time more then. Snoring badly while sleep.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), Masters in psychology counselling
Psychologist, Hyderabad
Dear lybrate-user, it is good that you wants to stop smoking, try this method we are destroying our health by smoking normal human takes oxygen into lungs 12 -15 times per minute (12 - 15 breaths) lungs mixes oxygen in blood and it purifies our blood, by smoking we are mixing not only oxygen adding and mixing bad elements like nicotine etc. In oxygen, that spoils our blood and our body all organs like lungs, heart, kidney etc. In our body. How to quit: by willingness and willpower" where there is a will there is a way" reduce one by one day by day. If you need any support have counseling help.
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I have problem of phobia and fear, my thoughts come mostly negative, I goes to depression suggest cure.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
I have problem of phobia and fear, my thoughts come mostly negative, I goes to depression suggest cure.
Fear and anxiety often times go together. At your age this claim is serious. If you have depression then there are some major ramifications to take into account. I believe there may be some genetic predisposition or there has been some childhood issue, related to anger, that needs urgent attention. You must go and meet with a counselor immediately and if that person advises that you meet with a doctor you must do so and cooperate to your utmost. Please visit these professionals along with your parents. In the meantime please do the following sincerely because you could resolve the problem better with good cooperation: Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber, nuts, avocado, exercise regularly, eat dark chocolate, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. I suggest you do the opposite of what this depression makes you feel like doing (actually, not doing): you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least, 30 minutes but not in the scorching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don’t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. Above all to be really happy, you need to live in love and for love. Learn all about emotions and how to handle them and that will get you out of the depression rather easily and quickly. A counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success. Be positive every day and learn to be contented with what you have. Do some left brain exercises: it is the happy brain. Here are a few suggestions: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. Whatever happens please cooperate with the therapy and do not discontinue until the condition is completely resolved.
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I forgot everything which I read, so can you give me some suggestion to get out of this? Please help me.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
1. 7 Lifestyle-Based Ways to Improve Your Memory 1. Eat Right. The foods you eat ? and don't eat ? play a crucial role in your memory. ... 2. Exercise. ... 3. Stop Multitasking. ... 4. Get a Good Night's Sleep. ... 5. Play Brain Games. ... 6. Master a New Skill. ... 7. Try Mnemonic Devices. There are mind training and some memory boosting medicines also. Ask me privately. Eight Ways to Remember Anything Research-based strategies to boost your memory and keep it strong 8 Strategies for Remembering 1. Become interested in what you're learning. We're all better remembering what interests us. Few people, for example, have a difficult time remembering the names of people they find attractive. If you're not intrinsically interested in what you're learning or trying to remember, you must find a way to become so. 2. Find a way to leverage your visual(link is external) memory. You'll be astounded by how much more this will enable you to remember. For example, imagine you're at a party and are introduced to five people in quick succession. How can you quickly memorize their names? Pick out a single defining visual characteristic of each person and connect it to a visual representation of their name, preferably through an action of some kind. For example, you can remember Mike who has large ears by creating a mental picture of a microphone (a "mike") clearing those big ears of wax (gross, I know?but all the more effective because of it). It requires mental effort to do this, but if you practice you'll be surprised how quickly you can come up with creative ways to generate these images. Here's another example: How often do you forget where you left your keys, your sunglasses, or your wallet? The next time you put something down somewhere, pause a moment to notice where you've placed it, and then in your mind blow it up. If you visualize the explosion in enough detail, you won't forget where you put it. Remember: Memory is predominantly visual. 3. Create a mental memory tree. If you're trying to memorize a large number of facts, find a way to relate them in your mind visually with a memory tree. Construct big branches first, then leaves. Branches and leaves should carry labels that are personally meaningful to you in some way, and the organization of the facts ("leaves") should be logical. It's been well recognized since the 1950's we remember "bits" of information better if we chunk them. For example, it's easier to remember 467890 as "467" and "890" than as six individual digits. 4. Associate what you're trying to learn with what you already know. It seems the more mental connections we have to a piece of information, the more successful we'll be in remembering it. This is why using mnemonics. Write out the items to be memorized over and over and over. Among other things, this is how I learned the names of bacteria, what infections they cause, and what antibiotics treat them. Writing out facts(link is external) in lists improves recall if you make yourself learn the lists actively instead of passively. In other words, don't just copy the list of facts you're trying to learn but actively recall each item you wish to learn and then write it down again and again and again. In doing this, you are, in effect, teaching yourself what you're trying to learn?and as all teachers know, the best way to ensure you know something is to have to teach it. This method has the added benefit of immediately showing you exactly which facts haven't made it into your long-term memory so you can focus more attention on learning them rather than wasting time reinforcing facts you already know. 5. When reading for retention, summarize each paragraph in the margin. This requires you to think about what you're reading, recycle it, and teach it to yourself again. Even take the concepts you're learning and reason forward with them; apply them to imagined novel situations, which creates more neural connections to reinforce the memory. 6. Do most of your studying in the afternoon. Though you may identify yourself as a "morning person" or "evening person" at least one Study. suggests your ability to memorize isn't influenced as much by what time of day you perceive yourself to be most alert but by the time of day you actually study?afternoon appearing to be the best. 7. Get adequate sleep to consolidate and retain memories. Not just at night(link is external) after you've studied but the day before(link is external) you study as well. Far better to do this than to stay up cramming all night for an exam.
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I am losing my temperature shortly pls help me out with that n m going to kick of my self pls help me out with that.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear lybrate-user, welcome to lybrate. Anger and aggression are emotions. Anger comes when you become irritated. Irritation happens when you don't like something, or when something is repeated. As anger is an emotion, it should be vent out. You should be able to throw anger out instead of controlling it. But more perfect will be, know the frustrating situations and stop being emotional. If practiced properly, you will not get irritated at those circumstances at all. Those techniques are much easier to understand. I suggest anger management therapy. Take care.
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I am a newly married girl. Its a love come arrange marriage. BUt anger from my childhood was always distructive. Currently I am not working for the last five months since I got married. The sad part is even for small thing I go mad at my husband and I abuse him and hit him badly. In my anger I dont see at whom I am roaring and throwing and hitting. And when I am alone I would cry out loud and feel like punishing myself. I dont feel loved and cared and accepted. I know suside is a sin so I wont commit, but I dont want to live.

(MRCPSYCH-UK), MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Hyderabad
A similar behavior in the past during your teens, or incidents of self harm, now emotional lability and emptiness suggest you could be suffering from borderline personality disorder. Kindly consult a psychotherapist or a psychiatrist because if unaddressed it can ruin your marital life.
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what should i do i forgot the things very often.. and also i am suffering from pain in my legs what should i do?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
what should i do i forgot the things very often.. and also i am suffering from pain in my legs what should i do?
For the pain in your legs do visit a doctor to determine its cause and follow up. If you have not been exercising, it will help to get started. Besides, the growth hormone may have begun its agenda and that could have an impact on your body and cause some discomfort too. I suspect that the adolescent issues with regard to hormones may be affecting your ability to concentrate and remember. When the hormones play up, it lasts for a period of close to two years and during that time you could be influenced by three signs directly impacted by the chemical: you will tend to become aggressive and rebellious, you will become sexually active, and you will have acne and pimple problems. The hormonal imbalances may not only impact your memory because of the chemical but also bring some distractions that come with it. But you may work on the following even if the hormones kick in: Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Have a special place of learning, which should be well lit, with soft painted walls, well-ventilated, with no distractions. When you get bored, study by writing. If you repeat learning at least five to seven times, you will apparently remember for a longer time. Sit comfortably but do not slouch. The reading material should be of a fairly large print. Study at small intervals of about 40 minutes and then take a break or change the subject. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. There is a new exercise called Super Brain Yoga, which is done by holding the right earlobe with your left thumb and index finger, and the left earlobe with your right hand’s thumb and index finger. In this position you must squat down and rise up and do this for five minutes every day. There are some memory enhancing techniques and study methods that your teacher will be able to guide you with. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely. In that case, I suggest that the family goes for counseling too. The following foods do help too: Blueberries, walnuts, turmeric, Spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, acorn squash, green tea, oily fish, boiled egg, turkey, apples, oatmeal, leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds, avocado, cinnamon, thyme, sunflower seeds, and red wine. Avoid sugar and junk food.
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I am getting irritating every time without any reason even for small things please help me to get me out of this.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear lybrate-user, welcome to lybrate. Anger and aggression are emotions. Anger comes when you become irritated. Irritation happens when you don't like something, or when something is repeated. As anger is an emotion, it should be vent out. You should be able to throw anger out instead of controlling it. But more perfect will be, know the frustrating situations and stop being emotional. If practiced properly, you will not get irritated at those circumstances at all. Those techniques are much easier to understand. I suggest anger management therapy. Take care.
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I am 57 years old person and want to know the solution for hypertension?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist,
I am 57 years old person and want to know the solution for hypertension?
Live a stress-free life. Easier said than done! Not really. You need to be physically fit and stable, emotionally fit and stable, socially fit and stable, intellectually fit and stable and spiritually sit and stable. Eat healthy, exercise regularly, and sleep well. If you read, ?Reversing the Heart Disease by Dr. Dean Ornish, and follow it, you will do very well for yourself. You can switch to a salt called ?Induppu? in the South of India that is chemically different form regular table salt and is very good for High BP. Yoga and meditation mixed with some aerobic exercise are all useful to you. Learn stress management techniques, and calming exercises. When you learn how to handle your emotions, which are the primary cause of tension in all of us, you will do really well.
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I am a daily routine smoker and I have try to quit but its so tough for me so sir can you suggest me some kind of tips to reduce the some present in my lungs? Like some juices or?

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), Masters in psychology counselling
Psychologist, Hyderabad
Dear lybrate-user, it is good that you wants to stop smoking, try this method we are destroying our health by smoking normal human takes oxygen into lungs 12 -15 times per minute (12 - 15 breaths) lungs mixes oxygen in blood and it purifies our blood, by smoking we are mixing not only oxygen adding and mixing bad elements like nicotine etc. In oxygen, that spoils our blood and our body all organs like lungs, heart, kidney etc. In our body. How to quit: by willingness and willpower" where there is a will there is a way" reduce one by one day by day. If you need any support have counseling help.
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I am gay I wanna excite my straight friend to be have wild n hard Sex with me tonight I want good relationship with him please suggest me any medicine.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
You are 23 years, you should be able to do the same without any medications. Passionate sex lies in the mind of the partners. Make sure both of you are attractive to each other and have a blast. If you had been 40 or 50 plus, I can understand the need for medicines. This age it s not necessary, unless there is an underlying disorder.
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I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Please help me.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to myself all the time. Please ...
Dear lybrate-user. Welcome to lybrate. I can understand. Loosing someone near and dear is called grief and depression related to grief is pretty normal. But this sort of depression does not stay for long. This depression gets cleared within a span of some weeks. The best option for you is to undergo counseling and depression related therapy. Take care.
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