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Dr. Venkatesh

Pediatrician, Bangalore

Dr. Venkatesh Pediatrician, Bangalore
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I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. Venkatesh
Dr. Venkatesh is a trusted Pediatrician in Vittal Nagar, Bangalore. You can visit him at St Philomenas Hospital in Vittal Nagar, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Venkatesh on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Pediatricians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Pediatricians with more than 43 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Consultant Dyslexia, Autism & Child Psychologist. Consultant Clinical & Mental Health Psychologist., Post Masters Doc in Behavioural Medicine , Post Masters Doc Psychology
Psychologist, Noida
Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  1. Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten
  2. Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet
  3. Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make
  4. Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat
  5. Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'
  6. Has difficulty learning new words
  7. Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age
  8. Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences
  9. Has trouble rhyming

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School

  1. Struggles with reading and spelling
  2. Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'
  3. Has trouble remembering facts and numbers
  4. Has difficulty gripping a pencil
  5. Has difficulty using proper grammar
  6. Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization
  7. Gets tripped up by word problems in math
  8. Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words
  9. Has trouble following a sequence of directions

Warning Signs in High School

  1. Struggles with reading out loud
  2. Doesn't read at the expected grade level
  3. Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms
  4. Has difficulty organizing and managing time
  5. Struggles to summarize a story
  6. Has difficulty learning a foreign language

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:

General:

  1. Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.
  2. Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."
  3. Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.
  4. High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.
  5. Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.
  6. Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.
  7. Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.
  8. Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."
  9. Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  1. Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.
  2. Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.
  3. Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.
  4. Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.
  5. Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.
  6. Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  1. Spells phonetically and inconsistently.
  2. Hearing and Speech Skills
  3. Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.
  4. Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.

Writing and Motor Skills:

  1. Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.
  2. Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.
  3. Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.
  4. Math and Time Management Skills
  5. Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.
  6. Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.
  7. Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.
  8. Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.

Memory and Cognition:

  1. Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.
  2. Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.
  3. Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).
  4. Behavior, Health, Development and Personality
  5. Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.
  6. Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.
  7. Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).
  8. Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.
  9. Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.
  10. Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.
  11. Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  • Read out loud every day
  • Tap into your child's interests
  • Use audiobooks
  • Look for apps and other high-tech help
  • Focus on effort, not outcome
  • Make your home reader-friendly
  • Boost confidence

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  • Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.
  • Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.
  • Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a neurologist and ask a free question.

2610 people found this helpful

I'm 23 yrs old male. I having gynaecomastia. I have memory problems.I'm facing difficulties in communication with other persons. I have lack of confidence in doing any task. My mood also changes frequently. I'm facing severe depression from last 7 years. And my behaviour is similer with ADHD. I read lot of meterial related to depression , ADHD, bipolar disorder and also klinefelter. I'm fearing that I have klinefelter so please give me instructions about to whom I should refer & which tests to be made for diagnosis.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
You will need to consult with a sexologist, counselor, and psychiatrist to realistically discover what your problem is. In the last 7 years, some from your depression and mostly because of your adolescence, you have become very suggestible. This does not augur well because at the mere mention of some disease, you could identify with it and even produce symptoms to ratify your belief. So reading so much about different pathologies will only corrupt your mind and will never bring peace and finality to your diagnosis. Therefore, do no more self-assessment and visit a doctor who will guide you and help you understand your condition. Since you are depressed, you will have other complications and some of the symptoms may overlap with other disorders that you will easily feel that you are suffering from those diseases too. This will all make you miserable, and more depressed. You are still young and if your condition is identified early, interventions are more successful. Visit the professional soon.
2 people found this helpful
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What is cpld food? Then what shall I give to my lactose intolerant 10 month old baby.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
If you have already started your baby on solid foods, you can cut down on dairy other than your breastmilk. But curd is fine as it does not contain any lactase. So you can prepare a nice lassi for your little one or give him some raita. Those who are lactose intolerant can often handle small amounts of dairy if they eat it with other foods. If you are formula feeding, your doctor may advise you to switch to a lactose-free or soya based formula for two weeks or so as your baby gets over his lactose intolerence. If your child is older and tests have confirmed he is lactose intolerant, then you may have to make some dietary changes like: Feeding reduced portions of dairy-based foods in combination with non-dairy foods. Not giving a large glass of milk and offering a small portion along with a meal to aid digestion. Choosing foods with less lactose such as curd, paneer and hard cheeses, as they are better tolerated. Substituting milk with soyamilk, almond milk, rice milk or fortified fruit juices. Substituting dairy products with leafy greens, tofu, broccoli, nuts, soya beans, dried fruit. Before you make any changes to your child's diet, always consult a dietitian or a doctor. They can help you plan better. In order to maintain a normal healthy metabolism, everything we eat or drink should be close to our body’s normal temperature. However, particularly in hot weather or as a matter of habit, almost everyone likes to drink cold beverages or eat cold foods (like ice cream) without noticing the potential problems that will be encountered or connecting it to the temperature of the food or drink you take into your body.
1 person found this helpful
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My son have a bad habit. He is 5 years. Wo apni finger, nose m dalkr. Apny mouth m dalta hai. Pehle y problem nhi thi. Kuch time s krny Kya hai. Kya kuch help mil skti hai. Kya iski koi medicine available hai. Please help me.

MBBS MD DCH, Dch
Pediatrician, Muzaffarpur
It is a behaviour disorder and self limiting. Behavour modification and positive reinforcement by award is important by proper counseling and communication. There is nothing to worry about. DO NOT SCOLD THE CHILD. TALK TO HIM REGARDING HEALTH HAZARDS AND AWARD HIM FOR COMPLIANCE. BEST WISHES
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Hi, My baby girl is 6 months old she is suffering from motions from last 6 days we consulted doctor but it is not stopping.

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Just remove the milk diet and give cearel soup. At same time give probiotics like econorm can be given with help.
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M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
A regular bed time routine is very necessary for a child.
1 person found this helpful

I am 21 years old. I have 6 months baby. I give breast milk. Minimum and maximum How many years I have to give breast milk? Please tell me.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Jaipur
You can breast feed your child as long as possible,but addition of top feed liquids,semisolids & solids is very important for normal growth of child. We recommond weaning at 6 moths of age.If child is eating sufficient,breast feeding can be continued.Usually most children leave breast feed after 2 years of age switching to top feed only.
3 people found this helpful
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My daughter is in 6th std she has lots of lices and nits in her hair pls give me some solution for this ?

Pediatrician, Pune
can apply 15ml gammascab lotion mixed with shampoo thrice in a week over her hair , the same should be done for other family members if they are having the same , screen some of her close friends in the school who might be having similar problem
1 person found this helpful
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My son is 4.5 yrs old. He has tight foreskin (phimosis) what should I do? should I administer a surgery or wait for couple of years.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
If the area bulges out like balloon causing restriction oflow you may need surgery. You can try pulling back skin even though it will be painful. Apply t bact ointment to prevent skin infection after it is broken by pulling. Ask privately.
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I have one child one year old she is not eating food also didn't drink water also am worried why she is not taking food now a days I had meet a pediatrician but they didn't check properly. Please help me am so nervous am worrying. Please reply me soon.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
You should always mention the weight of the baby when you discuss hie health concerns. Poor food intake can be due to hypothyroidism and check up TSH and inform me .ALso do CBC to know if he is anemic. Next, not important if he is feeding in bottle you must stop bottle and feed from a cup or sipper.
1 person found this helpful
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My son is 7 years old. He is having stomach ache, loose motions and vomiting. He had motions and vomiting twice since this morning. He was fine yesterday. He went on School trip day before. Please advise.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Most likely he had food or water contamination may be due to outside food, water and heat. Now you can give him electoral water and sporolac tablet and soft diet like curd rice dal water coconut water etc. Always try to avoid outside food and water.
3 people found this helpful
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Baby is 14 month old still he is not talking in which age he is talking properly? He has tough tied problem also.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Some babies may be late in speaking. By 18 - 24 months he should talk well if not affected by any other disease THe tongue tie is not a severe problem unless movement of tongue is restricted. You consult with all details.
1 person found this helpful
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My daughter is 5 months old. She is fed with nan pro1. Is she low immune as she is not breastfed?

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician, Kanpur
Top fed child needs extra care and cleanliness for feeding a baby. Always give freshly prepared milk and follow the instructions printed on container.
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Sir I have one daughter of eight months old and his name is hrudya. She looking very week and I check his weight and found eight kg. So what can I do for increase his health.

M B A(Hospital Management), Post Graduate Diploma in Hospital Administration, M D, Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S)
Unani Specialist, Bangalore
it is common among children. no need to use any medicine instead you give her proper food and nutritional supplements.
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DIABETIC and Your SMILE

BDS
Dentist, Rajouri
DIABETIC and Your SMILE

Did you know that 29.1 million people living in the united states have diabetes? that's 9.3% of the population. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don't even know they have it. 

Diabetes affects your body's ability to process sugar. All food you eat is turned to sugar and used for energy. In type I diabetes, the body doesn't make enough insulin, a hormone that carries sugar from your blood to the cells that need it for energy. In type ii diabetes, the body stops responding to insulin. Both cases result in high blood sugar levels, which can cause problems with your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other parts of your body.

So what does this have to do with that smile of yours and how can you protect it? first, it's important to understand the signs of diabetes and the roles they play in your mouth.

The symptoms of untreated diabetes

The warning signs of diabetes affect every part of your body. After a blood test, you may be told by a doctor that you have high blood sugar. You may feel excessively thirsty or have to urinate a lot. Weight loss and fatigue are other common symptoms. Diabetes can also cause you to lose consciousness if your blood sugar falls too low. 

If diabetes is left untreated, it can take a toll on your mouth as well. Here's how:

You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry. (dry mouth is also caused by certain medications.)
Because saliva protects your teeth, you're also at a higher risk of cavities.
Gums may become inflamed and bleed often (gingivitis).
You may have problems tasting food.
You may experience delayed wound healing.
You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth.
For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is typical.
Why people with diabetes are more prone to gum disease

All people have more tiny bacteria living in their mouth now than there are people on this planet. If they make their home in your gums, you can end up with periodontal disease. This chronic, inflammatory disease can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth and even your bones.

Periodontal disease is the most common dental disease affecting those living with diabetes, affecting nearly 22% of those diagnosed. Especially with increasing age, poor blood sugar control increases the risk for gum problems. In fact, people with diabetes are at a higher risk for gum problems because of poor blood sugar control. As with all infections, serious gum disease may cause blood sugar to rise. This makes diabetes harder to control because you are more susceptible to infections and are less able to fight the bacteria invading the gums.

How your dentist can help you fight diabetes

Regular dental visits are important. Research suggests that treating gum disease can help improve blood sugar control in patients living with diabetes, decreasing the progression of the disease. Practicing good oral hygiene and having professional deep cleanings done by your dentist can help to lower your hba1c. (this is a lab test that shows your average level of blood sugar over the previous three months. It indicates how well you are controlling your diabetes.)

Your diabetes dental health action plan

Teamwork involving self-care and professional care from your dentist will be beneficial in keeping your healthy smile as well as potentially slowing progression of diabetes. Here are five oral health-related things you can do to for optimal wellness:

Control your blood sugar levels. Use your diabetes-related medications as directed, changing to a healthier diet and even exercising more can help. Good blood sugar control will also help your body fight any bacterial or fungal infections in your mouth and help relieve dry mouth caused by diabetes.
Avoid smoking.
If you wear any type of denture, clean it each day.
Make sure to brush twice a day with a soft brush and floss correctly daily.
See your dentist for regular checkup.

3 people found this helpful

My 2 years old son is having loose motions since yesterday. Please suggest medicine for instant relief.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH)
Pediatrician,
For medicines you need to check him by pediatrician, that will be better. Only thing I need to emphasize is give him plenty of water, along with ors, give curd, moong dal khichadi etc.
1 person found this helpful
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My son is 14 years old (15-01-2002. In October he took cricket coaching for 10 days. Since then he fell ill frequently. Sometimes headaches, sometimes fever. He feel weakness all the time. Dr. Please suggest me diet or supplement for him. His height 5'10. Weight 60 kg.

MD - Paediatrics
Pediatrician, Allahabad
Problem of your child doesn't appear related to cricket coaching. In view of fever, headache & generalized weakness, a thorough evaluation is warranted. Pl consult your pediatrician at earliest.
1 person found this helpful
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My daughter is 3year 10 months old. In her left eye there is a clout from 2 months. Doctor said it puss. How it can be treated?

Fellowship in Comprehensive Ophthalmology, DOMS
Ophthalmologist, Sangrur
Pus from eye signify nasolacrimal duct bockage...i think according to age u can go for probing procedure ...consult oculoplasty specilist for same
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I need a vaccination schedule for my 2 and 1/2 year old and 11 years old girl child. For the youngest one, I have missed the typhoid 1 dose.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
You van give the missed dose Birth HepB: Hepatitis B vaccine; ideally, the first dose is given at birth, but kids not previously immunized can get it at any age. 1–2 months HepB: Second dose should be administered 1 to 2 months after the first dose. 2 months DTaP: Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine Hib: Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine IPV: Inactivated poliovirus vaccine PCV: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine RV: Rotavirus vaccine 4 months DTaP Hib IPV PCV RV 6 months DTaP Hib: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous Hib immunizations. PCV RV: This third dose may be needed, depending on the brand of vaccine used in previous RV immunizations. 6 months and annually Influenza (Flu): The flu vaccine is recommended every year for children 6 months and older: Kids younger than 9 who get the flu vaccine for the first time (or who have only had one dose before July 2016) will get it in two separate doses at least a month apart. Those younger than 9 who have had at least two doses of flu vaccine previously (in the same or different seasons) will only need one dose. Kids older than 9 only need one dose. The vaccine is given by injection with a needle (the flu shot). The nasal spray form that was available in the past is not currently recommended because it was not found to be effective enough in recent years. 6–18 months HepB IPV.
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After c section I have no breastfeeding first 8 days after that I have very low supply what is my problem.

Pediatrician, Kaithal
Late starting of breastfeeding is the main cause, as baby sucking is best stimulation for better breast milk output. Continue to feed. Also check your medicines, you are taking. If there is Pyridoxine in any drug, please stop it as it also decreases milk output.
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