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Dr. Sudhir

MD - Psychiatry

Psychiatrist, Bangalore

20 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic
Dr. Sudhir MD - Psychiatry Psychiatrist, Bangalore
20 Years Experience  ·  500 at clinic  ·  ₹ online
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I’m dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family. Doctor is an active member of FIPS ...more
I’m dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family. Doctor is an active member of FIPS
More about Dr. Sudhir
Dr. Sudhir is a renowned Psychiatrist in HAL, Bangalore. He has over 20 years of experience as a Psychiatrist. He is a MD - Psychiatry. You can meet Dr. Sudhir personally at bhargava mind clinic in HAL, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Sudhir on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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MD - Psychiatry - national institute of mental health - 1996
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English
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FIPS

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Arvind Avenue Road, Kundalahalli GateBangalore Get Directions
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WHY AND HOW TO SAY NO

Advanced Skills in Counselling, BSIC, Advanced Trainee of Transactional Analysis, DCS, Hypnotherapist
Psychologist
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In our Indian culture, we are taught to be polite and respectful especially with elders, whatever the cost to us. We must be polite with our guests and other relationships and at the workplace. Women must be never say no their in laws if they want to be happy in their married life. Employees should never say no to their bosses or managers or else they will lose their jobs.

There are 6 main reasons why people hesitate in saying NO:

1. You want to help. You are a kind soul at heart. You don’t want to turn the person away and you want to help where possible, even if it may eat into your time.
2. Afraid of being rude. I was brought up under the notion that saying “No”, especially to people who are more senior, is rude and disrespectful.
3. Wanting to be agreeable. You don’t want to alienate yourself from the group because you’re not in agreement. So you confirm to others’ request.
4. Fear of conflict. You are afraid the person might be angry if you reject him/her. This might lead to an ugly confrontation. Even if there isn’t, there might be friction created which might lead to negative consequences in the future.
5. Fear of lost opportunities. Perhaps you are worried saying no means closing doors. For example, one of my clients’ wife was asked to transfer to another department in her company. Since she liked her team, she didn’t want to shift. However, she didn’t want to say no as she felt it would affect her promotion opportunities in the future.
6. Not burning bridges. Some people take “no” as a sign of rejection. It might lead to bridges being burned and relationships severed.

Well these reasons are not true if you are familiar with the art of saying NO. Remember those people who said no to you and you didn't feel bad about it. The trick lies in when and how to say NO.
At the end of the day, it’s about how you say “no”, rather than the fact you’re saying no, that affects the outcome. After all, you have your own priorities and needs, just like everyone has his/her own needs. Saying no is about respecting and valuing your time and space. Saying no is your prerogative.

7 SIMPLE WAYS TO SAY NO
Rather than avoid it altogether, it’s all about learning the right way to say no. After I began to say no to others, I realized it’s really not as bad as I thought. The other people were very understanding and didn’t put up any resistance. Really, the fears of saying no are just in our mind. If you are not sure how to do so, here are 7 simple ways for you to say no. Use the method that best meets your needs in the situation.

The art lies in using appropriate body language, tone and proper timing. Coming across as genuine, warm and friendly will help to set the tone of the interaction and you will be the winner.

1. “I can’t commit to this as I have other priorities at the moment.”
If you are too busy to engage in the request/offer, this will be applicable. This lets the person know your plate is full at the moment, so he/she should hold off on this as well as future requests. If it makes it easier, you can also share what you’re working on so the person can understand better. I use this when I have too many commitments to attend to.

2. “Now’s not a good time as I’m in the middle of something. How about we reconnect at X time?”
It’s common to get sudden requests for help when you are in the middle of something. Sometimes I get phone calls from friends or associates when I’m in a meeting or doing important work. This method is a great way to (temporarily) hold off the request. First, you let the person know it’s not a good time as you are doing something. Secondly, you make known your desire to help by suggesting another time (at your convenience). This way, the person doesn’t feel disappointed or rejected.

3. “I’d love to do this, but …”
I often use this as it’s a gentle way of breaking no to the other party. It’s encouraging as it lets the person know you like the idea (of course, only say this if you do like it) and there’s nothing wrong about it. I often use this line when I get invitations to late night dinners and parties. Their ideas are absolutely great, but I can’t take part due to other reasons such as prior commitments or different needs.

4. “Let me think about it first and I’ll get back to you.”
This is more like a “Maybe” than a straight out “No”. If you are interested but you don’t want to say ‘yes’ just yet, use this. Sometimes I’m pitched a great idea which meets my needs, but I want to hold off on committing as I want some time to think first. There are times when new considerations pop in and I want to be certain of the decision before committing myself. If the person is sincere about the request, he/she will be more than happy to wait a short while. Specify a date / time-range (say, in 1-2 weeks) where the person can expect a reply.

If you’re not interested in what the person has to offer at all, don’t lead him/her on. Use methods #5, #6 or #7 which are definitive.

5. “This doesn’t meet my needs now but I’ll be sure to keep you in mind.”
If someone is pitching a deal/opportunity which isn’t what you are looking for, let him/her know straight-out that it doesn’t meet your needs. Otherwise, the discussion can drag on longer than it should. It helps as the person know it’s nothing wrong about what he/she is offering, but that you are looking for something else. At the same time, by saying you’ll keep him/her in mind, it signals you are open to future opportunities.

6. “I’m not the best person to help on this. Why don’t you try X?”
If you are being asked for help in something which you (i) can’t contribute much to (ii) don’t have resources to help, let it be known they are looking at the wrong person. If possible, refer them to a lead they can follow-up on – whether it’s someone you know, someone who might know someone else, or even a department. I always make it a point to offer an alternate contact so the person doesn’t end up in a dead end. This way you help steer the person in the right place.

7. “No, I can’t.”
The simplest and most direct way to say no. We build up too many fears in our mind to saying no. As I shared earlier in this article, these fears are self-created and they are not true at all. Don’t think so much about saying no and just say it outright. You’ll be surprised when the reception isn’t half as bad as what you imagined it to be.

THE BENEFITS OF SAYING NO:

Overcommitting by trying to cram too many activities into too little time leads to stress. We are much more likely to get sick when we are stressed. And chronic stress can cause serious health risks including depression and heart attacks.

1. OPEN COMMUNICATION: this way you are able to tell people who you really are and what is your capabilities and responsibilities towards yourself. This fosters for honest communication. Other people also see you as a human with virtues and limitations. This builds genuine relationships. Nowadays working women are clear about asking their husbands to pitch in towards house work and husbands are open about wanting a working spouse to support the finances. This creates space for pooling our strengths and working in collaboration with each other.

2. BOUNDARIES: with this practice you will be able to take care of those people who like to push or boss around other people to get their way. Drinking, smoking, drugs are common ways that children and adults with weaker personal boundaries, get drawn into. Learning to say no protects you from potential damage.

3. TIME FOR YOUR GOALS: You make out time for what is important to you and your vision of life. By saying no to late night parties, I am able to eat less junk, get a good sleep and get up early to exercise. Saying no to unrelated office presentations gets you time to spend with family.

Learn to say no to requests that don’t meet your needs, and once you do that you’ll find how easy it actually is. You’ll get more time for yourself, your work and things that are most important to you
WHY AND HOW TO SAY NO

Hello Dr. m unable to learn anything I forgot everything my nursing exams are held in oct next month what will I write in my exams m just dieing each N every minute my brain is talking every minute to me even m not able to sleep in night and I feel sleepy in day time whatever I prepare in one month I forget everything m late admission student when I write to practice for my exams I ask myself kya likhna Hai mujhe kuch kuch yaad rehta h bs kya karu kuch samajh ni arha Hai only 20 days are left for my exams and syllabus is lengthy my parents kill me if m fail. Pls help me thanks and regards.

M.B.S.(HOMEO), MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath
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Hello Dr. m unable to learn anything I forgot everything my nursing exams are held in oct next month what will I writ...
Anxiety has a fairly profound effect on your body, and causes a lot of strange and surprising symptoms. One symptom that often surprises people is that anxiety can cause forgetfulness. There are issues related to anxiety that can lead to memory loss and a general inability to remember things, and unfortunately as long as you live with anxiety you put yourself at risk for this forgetfulness to get worse. Causes of Exam Phobia: Unrealistic expectations of parents from their children. Parental pressure that cause greater worry and fear of failure. Excessive pressure and fear of teachers. Inadequate study. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Poor motivation and lack of self esteem. Poor nutrition and sleeping disturbance. Symptoms of Exam Phobia: Symptoms of Exam Phobia can be divided into 3 categories- physiological, cognitive or behavioural and emotional. Test Anxety Test Anxiety Physiological Symptoms: Head-aches Stomach-aches Nausea Diarrhoea Excessive sweating Shortness of breath Fainting Rapid heart breath Dry mouth Panic attacks Trembling and limbs become cold Vomiting Shaking Frequent urination Test Anxiety Test Anxiety Cognitive/ Behavioural Symptoms: Fear of failure Random thoughts Feeling of inadequacy Negative self talk Suicidal ideation Feeling of excessive mental pressure Insomnia or hypersomnia Drop out from school Difficulty in concentrating Emotional Symptoms: Low self esteem Frustration Depression Anger Feeling of hopelessness and helplessness Feeling of disappointment Some tips for overcoming Exam Phobia: Develop study habit: Be prepared for exam. Start study at least 15 days before the examination. Make a time schedule and prepare your lessons according to it. Develop positive attitude: Motivate yourself and keep trying. Always remember you can do it. Don’t study continuously. Take break between your study times. Don’t lose your self confidence. Try to develop self esteem. Stay focused: Concentrate on your test not others during the examination time. Avoid talking with other students about the subject before an examination. Use mnemonics: Mnemonics are the techniques of memorization. You can make chart, rhymes or phrase to memorize your lessons. Meditation: Meditation is one of the best medicine that can reduce your anxiety. Make a habit of meditation at least 10 minutes per day. It surely increases your concentration power. Meditation Meditation Practice relaxation techniques: During the examination, if you feel stresses try to take deep slow breath and relax your muscles. This will help to better focus on your exam. Stay relax Stay relax Consult psychologist: If your anxiety becomes uncontrollable, don’t hesitate to consult a psychologist or therapist. CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) in treating anxiety disorders. It helps to change your thought process and negative beliefs. Performance or test anxiety is highly treatable so you can get absolutely get better result.

Tip to beat social isolation

MS- Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist
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Tip to beat social isolation
1 be part of gathering that interest you dance yoga etc
2 learn new strategies that make you socially adaptive and help you overcome fear and build a good social relationship.
3 master any art or subject well so there is more scoop to be share be admired and inspired other
4 discuss problem b open to suggestions. Implement them discuss them with other. This acts as enhancer n stress buster.
5 think positive negative thoughts act as a base from social isolation. Overcome negative thought having positive self-image n self-acceptance leads to healthy life.
6 there is always a second chance. It is okay to be wrong. Mistake help you grow to learn from them never give up.
7 it is imp to have social interaction as one of the priorities on the to do list. Just presence of other people around automatically leads to positive changes
Tip to beat social isolation

Sir I am 30 year old girl I feel stress while talking n thinking abt marriage n feel anger secondly I also feel irritated and pain in my back head. please guide what should I doo.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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Sir I am 30 year old girl I feel stress while talking n thinking abt marriage n feel anger secondly I also feel irrit...
Worrying can be helpful when it spurs you to take action and solve a problem. But if you’re preoccupied with “what ifs” and worst-case scenarios, worry becomes a problem. Unrelenting doubts and fears can be paralyzing. They can sap your emotional energy, send your anxiety levels soaring, and interfere with your daily life. But chronic worrying is a mental habit that can be broken. You can train your brain to stay calm and look at life from a more positive perspective. start doing yoga and exercise

Good Morning sir/ma'am, Actually I learn things slowly . please suggest me ways how can I make my brain sharper?

BHMS
Homeopath
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Frequent repetition is the best remedy for sharping your memory. Practice meditating for 10 mins a day and then gradually augment the duration. Do this every morning, evening and just before you retire.

Health Quote of the Week

MD - Psychiatry, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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Closer proximity to green space reduces symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Health Quote of the Week

I am still suffering from speech problem mainly when I speak fast and also feel stress, after I had my tongue tie surgery 2 years ago ,so what should I do to improve my speech.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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Dear lybrate-user, you need to consult a speech therapist who can teach you technique of speaking. Speaking slowing is always good for people with speech problems. All d best!

There is a headache and feel depressed.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
Pediatrician
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There is a headache and feel depressed.
You can try mind relaxation techniques and some medicines may help. You have to ask privately with all details if you need any prescription.

How to be confident create or sense of humor sharpen the mind overcome the fear to talk to anyone and beat the shyness nature always live alone nature Is it some kind of problem if it's then how to confront all of these to create new person who is perfect in all this is anyone help me in this.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath
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How to be confident create or sense of humor sharpen the mind overcome the fear to talk to anyone and beat the shynes...
Hello, Lybrate user, This is condition caused by social anxiety/ phobia. Your are over weight more than 40 kg which creats a condition of depression to go among your friends being obeqsed. You need to reduce your weight by 40 kg to over come all sorts of your problem. - can be reduced, by opting-certain natural-norms in life & taking ,meal, judiciously. * Go for a brisk walk in d morning / evening at least 10 000, steps 45 mnts to restore blood circulation to nourish d whole body. * Tk, 3/4 litres of water, free from conteminents to eliminate toxins and to regulate metabolism to burn fats cell & prevent constipation. Go for meditation to reduce your stress and to nourish cell& tissues to curb fats cells, improving haemoglobin level in blood. * go for either, cycling, jogging, swimming, skipping, gardening, playing badminton, dancing,regularly. * opt staircase, instead of a lift in your office. * Tk, oats with green tea or, 1 slice of whole grain bread with 1 cup of cooked vegetable soup + 1 fruit (pomegranate, pear) in d breakfast. * Tk, salad, fruits,sprouts in ample qty in lunch, your meal b preferably, vegetarian ,high in proteins and fibre, maintains 1300-1600 calories through dietary regulation. * consume salad, fruits (not juice) whenever you feel hungry. * Avoid, nicotine,coffee, alcohol,junk food, cookies, burger,pizza ,butter, ghee,sitting on computer late in d night. # Homoeo medicines which r administered gently ,acts rapidly without any adverse effect, thereof. @ Phyto berryQ -10 drops, thrice, with little lukewarm water before each meal * Your feedback will highly b appreciated for further follow up, please. Tk, care.

I am 25 years old male. Earlier I used opium but on 30th march 16, I leave it. Now I am using tapentadol hydro chloride capsule as a pain killer. But when we don't use it, my condition goes very pathetic even I can't stand without this medicine. Due to above reason I always have depression. I just want to know how can I leave this medicine.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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I am 25 years old male. Earlier I used opium but on 30th march 16, I leave it. Now I am using tapentadol hydro chlori...
I can understand your situation. Its wrong to use tramadol HCL for such a long duration. You have to undergo detoxification under some experienced psychiatrist of this field. Only after detoxification we can decide whether you should put on drug free condition, antagonist or agonist maintenance. So do consult.

I've been taking citalopram 20mg since November and I think it has helped overall, however over the last week or so my obsessive / intrusive thoughts have come back which has been very upsetting. Do I ride out this blip or try upping to 30mg? I'm losing hope of ever feeling completely well again.

DHMS (Hons.)
Homeopath
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I've been taking citalopram 20mg since November and I think it has helped overall, however over the last week or so m...
Dear lybrate user, I being a homoeopath, can suggest some medication in homoeopathy, take, homoeo medicine. @ ignatia 30-6 pills, thrice a day. @ gelsemium 200-6 pills, thrice a day. Go for meditation to carry oxygen to your brain to calm down your obsessive compulsive disorder. Take, plenty of water to eliminate toxins and to dilute your blood to reach your cells & tissues for their nourishment. Take, your meal, easily digestible, on time. Go for a walk in d morning to restore blood circulation. Please report, wklytake, care.

My son(age 3. 5 years) has started stammering recently. How can we get out of it? please advise.

Master of Hospital Administration, Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
Audiologist
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Dont scold him more often for it. Its a developmental process and if after a year he continues then consult a speech therapist nearby. Make him read.

How to overcome anxiety and depression ?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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How to overcome anxiety and depression ?
These problems are connected to anger or sadness and if you do some work with expressing these feelings I am sure you will experience a lot of relief. Anxiety is often seen to go with depression but the underlying cause is anger or sadness and you need to identify whether that is of recent origin or comes from some experience in childhood. In the meantime do the following, sincerely: Have a good night?s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber, nuts, avocado, exercise regularly, eat dark chocolate, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. I suggest you do the opposite of what this depression makes you feel like doing (actually, not doing): you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least 30 minutes but not in the scotching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don?t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. Above all to be really happy, you need to live in love and for love: find someone to love and to love you back. If you love yourself adequately, you will never do harm to yourself. Be positive always and learn to do everything possible to invest into yourself. Life is extremely precious and because the depression, which is a mood disorder, makes you feel like giving up you must still persevere. Learn all about emotions and how to handle them and that will get you out of the depression rather easily and quickly. A counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success. Be positive everyday and learn to be contended with what you have. Do some left brain exercises: it is the happy brain. Here are a few suggestions: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. Whatever happens please cooperate with the therapy and do not discontinue until the condition is completely resolved. Because you are young the prognosis is good subject to your cooperation.

I am a 40 year old male. I am experiencing extreme mood swings / nervousness which last from 1 to 3 months. It has negatively effected my work and family life. Please advise.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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I am a 40 year old male. I am experiencing extreme mood swings / nervousness which last from 1 to 3 months. It has ne...
You need to visit a psychiatrist immediately. This sounds like a serious condition, and you may be able to stave off worse developments if you act fast. Apart from the medication you must also seek help from a counselor for a good length of time. In the counseling you will learn a lot of skills and techniques to cope with the everyday challenges of life. If it turns out to be a pathological condition there is much work to be done and your cooperation is in your best interest. Do not self-regulate your medication, and comply with all the advice and prescriptions of the concerned doctors. When the mood swings to a better state, you may deceive yourself by thinking that you can now manage without help. That is a typical danger with this condition. Do not succumb to that belief and trust the professional. You could, if you want, seek a second opinion just for your curiosity.

Is there any problem with me because I don't feel compassionate about my dad. Recently he met with an accident and instead of asking how he is I was watching movie.Please tell.

B.Sc(Hons) Mumbai Univ., ND, MD - Alternate Medicine, Aroma Therap., Bach Flower Rem, Mental Health Cert.
Alternative Medicine Specialist
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Is there any problem with me because I don't feel compassionate about my dad. Recently he met with an accident and in...
Hi I will prescribe some harmless but effective flower remedy available in homoeopathy shops. Try to buy original medicines. Mix 3 drops of mimulus + 3 drops of agrimony + 3 drops of scleranthus. Mix these with 100 ml water and drink it every morning and night.(same dose) on empty stomach.

I'm not able to concentrate. Properly in my study. What should I do. And I've 2nd pu exam. So please help me.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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Your age is the factor. I suspect that the adolescent issues with regard to hormones may be affecting your ability to concentrate and remember. When the hormones play up, it lasts for a period of close to two years and during that time you could be influenced by three signs directly impacted by the chemical: you will tend to become aggressive and rebellious, you will become sexually active, and you will have acne and pimple problems. The hormonal imbalances may not only impact your memory because of the chemical but also bring some distractions that come with it. But you may work on the following even if the hormones kick in: Daily exercise of at least half an hour is a must. Even if you go to a gym, ask for aerobic and/or callisthenic exercises with whatever else you are doing. A healthy body harbors a healthy mind. With regard to memory, it is very important that your brain and body is ideally rested to be able to recall whatever is required, rather comfortably. Puzzles pose problems to the brain that help it to use new pathways and neurons, which give the brain considerable exercise. It taxes the left brain to use logic to solve the myriad possibilities which other activities do not stimulate. Crosswords are excellent for vocabulary learning and use. Jigsaws and Rubik cube stimulate different permutations to finally settle on the most likely one. Picture completion and anagrams help approach problem solving from several angles. Do Sudoku, and memory co-relation activities and skills. Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber (whole grains, fruits and vegetables), nuts, avocado, eat dark chocolate, consume less of fat and use olive oil instead, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. You need to check out if you are stronger visual or auditory. The visual is a better mode than the auditory. However, if you combine the two modes, you will get the best concentration. Have a special place of learning, which should be well lit, with soft painted walls, well-ventilated, with no distractions. When you get bored, study by writing. If you repeat learning at least five to seven times, you will apparently remember for a longer time. Sit comfortably but do not slouch. The reading material should be of a fairly large print. Study at small intervals of about 40 minutes and then take a break or change the subject. Short-term memory is a faculty of the left brain, and long-term memory is a feature of the right brain. When people are stressed, they tend to favor the right brain and abandon the left brain, where short-term memory resides. So, it is really very simple: deal with the stress and activate left brain functions. Here are a few suggestions to activate left brain function: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. There is a new exercise called Super Brain Yoga, which is done by holding the right earlobe with your left thumb and index finger, and the left earlobe with your right hand’s thumb and index finger. In this position you must squat down and rise up and do this for five minutes every day. There are some memory enhancing techniques and study methods that your teacher will be able to guide you with. If your home life is full of distractions and stress, it is likely to affect your memory, adversely. In that case, I suggest that the family goes for counseling too. The following foods do help too: Blueberries, walnuts, turmeric, Spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, acorn squash, green tea, oily fish, boiled egg, turkey, apples, oatmeal, leafy greens, lentils, pumpkin seeds, avocado, cinnamon, thyme, sunflower seeds, and red wine. Avoid junk food.

My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms like reduced motivation, speech and activity are occurred. Now he is on medications for that. He is on tab quiet 25 mg (Quetiapine Fumarate INN 28.728 mg equivalent to 25 mg of Quetiapine) once daily. 1 hour after taking this medicine he gets calm and sleeps. Even if he wakes up in the middle of the night, he was not in his senses at that time. Most of the time he urinates while he is asleep. Even he forgets to go to washroom and he poops in his pants but he forgets to wash himself. His condition is not improving. Kindly please suggest suitable medication which can cure above said things of his health.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, del...
Hi there ~ Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead Improving Emotional Health Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one. Preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care As you come to grips with an Alzheimer’s or other dementia diagnosis, you may be dealing with a whole range of emotions and concerns. You’ll no doubt be worried about how your loved one will change, how you’ll keep him or her comfortable, and how much your life will change. You’ll also likely be experiencing emotions such as anger, grief, and shock. Adjusting to this new reality is not easy. It’s important to give yourself some time and to reach out for help. The more support you have, the better you will be able to help your loved one. While some of these tips are directed specifically at Alzheimer’s patients, they may equally apply to those with other types of dementia as well, including vascular and mixed dementia. Early-stage Alzheimer’s care preparations There are some Alzheimer’s care preparations that are best done sooner rather than later. It may be hard to consider these questions at first, as it means thinking about a time when your loved one is already well down the road of his or her Alzheimer’s journey. However, putting preparations in place early helps a smoother transition for everyone. Depending on the stage of diagnosis, include the person with Alzheimer’s in the decision-making process as much as possible. If their dementia is at a more advanced stage, at least try to act on what their wishes would be. Questions to consider in preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care: Who will make healthcare and/or financial decisions when the person is no longer able to do so? While a difficult topic to bring up, if your loved one is still lucid enough, getting their wishes down on paper means they’ll be preserved and respected by all members of the family. Consider meeting with an elder law attorney to best understand your options. You’ll want to consider power of attorney, both for finances and for healthcare. If the person has already lost capacity, you may need to apply for guardianship/conservatorship. More information can be found in the Resources section below. How will care needs be met? Sometimes family members assume that a spouse or nearest family member can take on caregiving, but that is not always the case. Caregiving is a large commitment that gets bigger over time. The person with Alzheimer’s will eventually need round-the-clock care. Family members may have their own health issues, jobs, and responsibilities. Communication is essential to make sure that the needs of the Alzheimer’s patient are met, and that the caregiver has the support to meet those needs. Where will the person live? Is his or her own home appropriate, or is it difficult to access or make safe for later? If the person is currently living alone, for example, or far from any family or other support, it may be necessary to relocate or consider a facility with more support. Find out what assistance your medical team can provide in these areas. In some countries, you can also hire a care manager privately. Geriatric care managers can provide an initial assessment as well as assistance with managing your case, including crisis management, interviewing in-home help, or assisting with placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Developing day-to-day routines Having a general daily routine in Alzheimer’s and dementia care helps caregiving run smoothly. These routines won’t be set in stone, but they give a sense of consistency, which is beneficial to the Alzheimer’s patient even if they can’t communicate it. While every family will have their own unique routine, you can get some great ideas from your medical team or Alzheimer’s support group, especially regarding establishing routines to handle the most challenging times of day, such as evenings. Keep a sense of structure and familiarity. Try to keep consistent daily times for activities such as waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, receiving visitors, and bedtime. Keeping these things at the same time and place can help orientate the person. Let the person know what to expect even if you are not sure that he or she completely understands. You can use cues to establish the different times of day. For example, in the morning you can open the curtains to let sunlight in. In the evening, you can put on quiet music to indicate it’s bedtime. Involve the person in daily activities as much as they are able. For example, a person may not be able to tie their shoes, but may be able to put clothes in the hamper. Clipping plants outside may not be safe, but the person may be able to weed, plant, or water. Use your best judgment as to what is safe and what the person can handle. Communication tips As your loved one’s Alzheimer’s progresses, you will notice changes in communication. Trouble finding words, increased hand gestures, easy confusion, even inappropriate outbursts are all normal. Here are some do’s and don’ts on communicating: Communication Do's and Don'ts? Do Avoid becoming frustrated by empathizing and remembering the person can’t help their condition. Making the person feel safe rather than stressed will make communication easier. Take a short break if you feel your fuse getting short. Keep communication short, simple, and clear. Give one direction or ask one question at a time. Tell the person who you are if there appears to be any doubt. Call the person by name. Speak slowly. The person may take longer to process what’s being said. Use closed-ended questions which can be answered “yes” or “no.” For example, ask, “Did you enjoy the beef at dinner?” instead of “What did you have for dinner?” Find a different way to say the same thing if it wasn’t understood. Try a simpler statement with fewer words. Use distraction or fibs if telling the whole truth will upset the person with dementia. For example, to answer the question, “Where is my mother?” it may be better to say, “She’s not here right now” instead of “She died 20 years ago.” Use repetition as much as necessary. Be prepared to say the same things over and over as the person can’t recall them for more than a few minutes at a time. Use techniques to attract and maintain the person’s attention. Smile, make eye contact, use gestures, touch, and other body language. Don't Ever say things like: “Do you remember?” “Try to remember!” “Did you forget?” “How could you not know that? Ask questions that challenge short-term memory such as “Do you remember what we did last night?” The answer will likely be “no,” which may be humiliating for the person with dementia. Talk in paragraphs. Instead, offer one idea at a time. Point out the person’s memory difficulty. Avoid remarks such as “I just told you that.” Instead, just repeat it over and over. Talk in front of the person as if he or she were not present. Always include the person in any conversation when they are physically present. Use lots of pronouns such as "there, that, those, him, her, it. Use nouns instead. For example, instead of "sit there" say "sit in the blue chair. Use slang or unfamiliar words. The person may not understand the latest terms or phrases. Use patronizing language or “baby talk.” A person with dementia will feel angry or hurt at being talked down to. Use sarcasm or irony, even if meant humorously. Again, it can cause hurt or confusion. Planning activities and visitors As you develop daily routines, it’s important to include activities and visitors. You want to make sure that the Alzheimer’s patient is getting sensory experiences and socialization, but not to the point of getting overstimulated and stressed. Here are some suggestions for activities: Start with the person’s interests. Ask family and friends for memories of interests the person used to have. You’ll want to tailor the interests to the current level of ability so the person doesn’t get frustrated. Vary activities to stimulate different senses of sight, smell, hearing, and touch. For example, you can try singing songs, telling stories, movement such as dance, walking, or swimming, tactile activities such as painting, working with clay, gardening, or interacting with pets. Planning time outdoors can be very therapeutic. You can go for a drive, visit a park, or take a short walk. Even sitting on a balcony or in the backyard can be relaxing. Consider outside group activities designed for those with Alzheimer’s. Senior centers or community centers may host these types of activities. You can also look into adult day care programs, which are partial or full days at a facility catering to older adults and/or dementia patients. Visitors and social events Visitors can be a rich part of the day for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It can also provide an opportunity for you as the caregiver to socialize or take a break. Plan visitors at a time of day when your loved one can best handle them. Brief visitors on communication tips if they are uncertain and suggest they bring memorabilia your loved one may like, such as a favorite old song or book. Family and social events may also be appropriate, as long as the Alzheimer’s patient is comfortable. Focus on events that won’t overwhelm the person; excessive activity or stimulation at the wrong time of day might be too much to handle. Handling challenges in Alzheimer's and dementia care One of the most painful parts of Alzheimer’s disease is watching a loved one display behavior you never would have thought possible. Alzheimer’s can cause substantial changes in how someone acts. This can range from the embarrassing, such as inappropriate outbursts, to wandering, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Everyday tasks like eating, bathing, and dressing can become major challenges. Painful as some behaviors are, it’s critical not to blame yourself or try to handle all the changes in behavior alone. As challenging behavior progresses, you may find yourself too embarrassed to go out, for example, or to seek respite care. Unfortunately, difficult behavior is part and parcel of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t isolate yourself. Ask for help from the medical team and reach out to caregiver groups for support. There are ways to modify or better accommodate problem behaviors. Both the environment you create at home and the way you communicate with your loved one can make a substantial difference. Considering long-term Alzheimer's and dementia care It’s the nature of Alzheimer’s disease to progressively get worse as memory deteriorates. In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one will likely need round-the-clock care. Thinking ahead to these possibilities can help make decisions easier. To find links to organizations in your area that may be able to help, see Resources and References below. Care at home There are several options for extending care at home: In-home help refers to caregivers that you can hire to provide assistance for your loved one. In-home help ranges from a few hours a week of assistance to live-in help, depending on your needs. You’ll want to evaluate what sort of tasks you’d like help with, how much you can afford to spend, and what hours you need. Getting help with basic tasks like housekeeping, shopping, or other errands can also help you provide more focused care for your loved one. Day programs, also called adult day care, are programs that typically operate weekdays and offer a variety of activities and socialization opportunities. They also provide the chance for you as the caregiver to continue working or attend to other needs. There are some programs that specialize in dementia care. Respite care. Respite care is short-term care where your loved one stays in a facility temporarily. This gives you a block of time to rest, travel, or attend to other things. Is it time to move? As Alzheimer’s progresses, the physical and mental demands on you as caregiver can gradually become overwhelming. Each day can bring more challenges. The patient may require total assistance with physical tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as greater overall supervision. At some point, you won’t be able to leave your loved one alone. Nighttime behaviors may not allow you to sleep, and with some patients, belligerent or aggressive behaviors may exceed your ability to cope or feel safe. Every situation is different. Sometimes the gap can be bridged by bringing in additional assistance, such as in-home help or other family members to share the caregiving burden. However, it is not a sign of weakness if moving to your loved one to a facility seems like the best plan of care. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you’re overwhelmed by stress and fatigue, it’s difficult to maintain your caregiving standards. If the person with Alzheimer’s is living alone, or you as the primary caregiver have health problems, this option may need to be considered sooner rather than later. When considering your caregiving options, it’s important to consider whether you are able to balance your other obligations, either financial or to other family members. Will you be able to afford appropriate in-home coverage if you can’t continue caregiving? Talk to your loved one’s medical care team for their perspective as well. Evaluating an assisted living facility or nursing home If the best choice is to move the Alzheimer’s patient to a facility, it doesn’t mean you will no longer be involved in their care. You can still visit regularly and ensure your loved one gets the care he or she needs. Even if you are not yet ready to make that step, doing some initial legwork might save a lot of heartache in the case of a crisis where you have to move quickly. The first step is finding the right place for your loved one. Choosing a facility There are two main types of facilities that you will most likely have to evaluate for a loved one with Alzheimer’s: an assisted living facility or a nursing home. Assisted Living Assisted living is an option for those who need help with some activities of daily living. Some facilities provide minor help with medications as well. Staff is available twenty-four hours a day, but you will want to make sure they have experience handling residents with Alzheimer’s disease. Also be clear about what stage your loved may need to move to a higher level of care. Nursing homes Nursing homes provide assistance in both activities of daily living and a high level of medical care. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is almost always on the premises. Skilled nursing care providers and medical professionals such as occupational or physical therapists are also available. How do I choose a facility? Once you’ve determined the appropriate level of care, you’ll want to visit the facility—both announced and unannounced—to meet with the staff and otherwise evaluate the home. You will also want to evaluate the facility based on their experience with Alzheimer’s residents. Facilities that cater specifically for Alzheimer’s patients should have a designated area, often called a special care unit in the U.S. For residents with dementia. Questions to ask such a facility include: Policy and procedures – Does the unit mix Alzheimer’s patients with those with mental illness, which can be dangerous? Does the program require the family to supply a detailed social history of the resident (a good sign)? Environment – Is the unit clean? Is the dining area large enough for all residents to use it comfortably? Are the doors alarmed or on a delayed opening system to prevent wandering? Is the unit too noisy? Staffing – What is the ratio of residents to staff? (5 to 1 during the day, 9 to 1 at night is normal). What is staff turnover like? How do they handle meals and ensure adequate hydration, since the person can often forget to eat or drink? How do they assess unexpressed pain—if the Alzheimer’s resident has pain but cannot communicate it? Staff training – What training for Alzheimer’s care do they have? Does the facility provide staff with monthly in-service training on Alzheimer’s care? Activities – Is there an activity plan for each resident based on the person’s interests and remaining cognitive strengths? Are residents escorted outside on a daily basis? Are regular outings planned for residents? Services – Does the unit provide hospice services? What were the findings in the most recent state survey? What to expect during a transition Moving is a big adjustment both for the person with Alzheimer’s and you as their caregiver. Your loved one is moving to a new home with new faces. You are adjusting from being the person providing hands-on care to being an advocate. Remember to give yourself and the Alzheimer’s patient time to adjust. If you’re expecting to move, try to have essentials packed and ready to go, and as many administrative details taken care of as possible, as sometimes beds can come up quickly. Work closely with staff regarding your loved one’s needs and preferences. An extra familiar face during moving day, such as another relative or close friend, can also help. Each person adjusts differently to this transition. Depending on your loved one’s needs, you may either need to visit more frequently or give your loved one their own space to adjust. As the adjustment period eases, you can settle into the visiting pattern that is best for both of you. I hope this helps.

While talking mumbling the words how to stop mumbling while speaks mouth will stops.

MBBS
General Physician
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Please Do pranayam and meditation regularly Practice for clear speech at home regularly Take Saraswatarishta 20 ml twice daily with water Badam pak by Patanjali 1 tsf twice a day.

I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to my self all the time. Please help me.

DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Homeopath
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I lost somebody close last year and since then feel very depressed and prefer keeping to my self all the time. Please...
Homoeopathic medicine------- ignatia -amara 200 (dr reckeweg) drink 5 drops in 1 spoon fresh water daily night----------------

I feel depressed coz. M not working female used to stay at home . How to overcome depression.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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I feel depressed coz. M not working female used to stay at home . How to overcome depression.
If you are not gainfully employed (and I don't mean monetarily), then you could easily feel depressed. So even at home organize your day with engaging activities that will make a difference for the others comfort. Apart from doing for others, you must also do things for yourself. If you remain too much at home boredom and laziness could also creep in. So go out for movies, meals, classes, conferences, talks, meetings, social work, help with some NGOs, etc. If these measures do not work then try some of these suggestions too:You must go and meet with a counselor immediately if the depresion is really serious and if that person advises that you meet with a doctor you must do so and cooperate to your utmost. Please visit these professionals along with your parents. In the meantime please do the following sincerely because you could resolve the problem better with good cooperation: Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber, nuts, avocado, exercise regularly, eat dark chocolate, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. I suggest you do the opposite of what this depression makes you feel like doing (actually, not doing): you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least, 30 minutes but not in the scorching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don’t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. Above all to be really happy, you need to live in love and for love. Learn all about emotions and how to handle them and that will get you out of the depression rather easily and quickly. A counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success. Be positive every day and learn to be contented with what you have. Do some left brain exercises: it is the happy brain. Here are a few suggestions: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. Whatever happens please cooperate with the therapy and do not discontinue until the condition is completely resolved.
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