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Dr. Shyamsundar

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. Shyamsundar Veterinarian, Bangalore
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Shyamsundar
Dr. Shyamsundar is one of the best Veterinarians in Rajaji Nagar, Bangalore. You can visit him at Companions in Rajaji Nagar, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Shyamsundar on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 40 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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#13/Y, 59th Cross, 3rd Block, Rajaji Nagar. Landmark: Near Bhashyam CircleBangalore Get Directions
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My dog is not eating and her activeness has also decreased to a considerable level.What should I do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please let us know age breed sex and condition of the dog presently so that we could come for a calculation . else please take to a nearby vet
1 person found this helpful
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Sir Meri colony k ek dog ko khujli ho gyi h men usko neomak dwai bhi di pr vo think nhi ho rha please meri help kijey Mai animals ko tklif Mai nhi dekh skti Sir please please please help me.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi lybrate-user, the dog should also be given anti allergic tabs, multi vitamin tabs for early recovery.
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The hair around the right eye of my cockatiel seems "broken" The hair around the area is lost and it looks like a naked eye. I'm not sure if there is swelling. The other eye is fine. What should I do?

International Academy of Classical Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Pune
Apis 12c 3tims day for 10 days Kali carb 12c 3tims day for 10 days Euphrasi6c 3tims day for 10 days.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
What Makes Chocolate Poisonous to Dogs?

Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain caffeine and a related chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger.

The problem is that dogs metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans, reported by Denver veterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, tells WebMD.

“The buzz we get from eating chocolate may last 20 to 40 minutes, but for dogs it lasts many hours,” he says. “After 17 hours, half of the theobromine a dog has ingested is still in the system.”

Theobromine is also toxic to cats, but there are very few reported cases of theobromine poisoning in felines because they rarely eat chocolate.

Dogs, on the other hand, will eat just about anything.

Even small amounts of chocolate can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Truly toxic amounts can induce hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.
2 people found this helpful

5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

My 3 year old female lab has caught some kind of infection, she is having hairfall and her skin is visible i consulted a vet but it keeps happening again , she keeps scratching herself all day, vet consulted to use pet derm's shampoo and spray, should i continue using it, how will her hair grow back?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Can you share some pic of your dog? For now Pet Derm shampoo and spray is fine for now. You can use petben shampoo along with petderm shampoo.
1 person found this helpful
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Dear Doctor, My rabbit's hair removes from his mouth side,is their any medicine ? please advise .

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Check what he is eating. Check for any allergic compounds in the grass while nibling. Check for the external parasites like nits or lice on the hair. Change the place for feeding and see the difference.
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I have a parrot, its feathers are of red color. Bt it is unable to speak. What should I give this parrot to eat so that it start speaking.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
Parrots start speaking with training. The training should begin with small words like hi hello wah etc the training session should not be of more than 15 to 20 minutes in a row followed by giving gifts to the pet.
9 people found this helpful
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I have a pet dog his name is tayson and how should I train him like a professional and want to know about health tips for him.?

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
Training should be started at the age of 3+ months as the age increases the pets power to be get trained decreases so if possible you should go for training along with a professional dog trainer for first two to three months latter on you can carry on
8 people found this helpful
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My chicken has eaten a crocin advanced tablet n very worried about whats going to happen I really am worried is it going to harm it or no please help me and let me know please.

MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bidar
My chicken has eaten a crocin advanced tablet n very worried about whats going to happen I really am worried is it go...
Nothing will happen. Only thing is your pet may be relieved of cold and cough. Most of human medicines work well in pets with least side effects. No worries.
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