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Dr. Sanjay B.S

Post Graduate Diploma in Diabetology (PGDD), MBBS

Endocrinologist, Bangalore

21 Years Experience  ·  0 - 500 at clinic
Dr. Sanjay B.S Post Graduate Diploma in Diabetology (PGDD), MBBS Endocrinologist, Bangalore
21 Years Experience  ·  0 - 500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
More about Dr. Sanjay B.S
Dr. Sanjay B.S is one of the best Endocrinologists in Hongasandra, Bangalore. He has helped numerous patients in his 21 years of experience as a Endocrinologist. He is a Post Graduate Diploma in Diabetology (PGDD), MBBS . He is currently practising at S.M. Diabetes and Diagnostic Center in Hongasandra, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Sanjay B.S on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Endocrinologists in India. You will find Endocrinologists with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Endocrinologists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
Post Graduate Diploma in Diabetology (PGDD) - Amaravathi University - 1996
MBBS - Mysore University - 2003

Location

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#289/7, Nithyasree Building, Near Petrol Bunk ,Hongasandra, Begur Main Road,BangaloreBangalore Get Directions
250 at clinic
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#365, Sulochana Building, 1st Floor, 3rd Block, Sarjapura Road Landmark : Near Green Wood SchoolBangalore Get Directions
500 at clinic
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13/A, 1st Floor, Wilson Garden Housing Society, Kothnur Dinne Main Road, Landmark : Opposite Pai International, BangaloreBangalore Get Directions
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I am 58 year old lady. I am suffering from severe pain in my heels for past one month. When I get up in the morning it is difficult to walk. I am also a patient of hypothyroidism and take eltroxine 100mg in the morning. Ialso take sheical 500 and neurobion forte. Please advise how to get rid of the pain in my heels. Should I take thuja 1000 ?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
I am 58 year old lady. I am suffering from severe pain in my heels for past one month. When I get up in the morning i...
Kindly show me a photograph of the affected part. Rule out diabetes & vit. D deficiency or any other metabolic disorder. Sleep on a hard bed with soft bedding on it. Spring beds, folding beds or thick mattress are harmful Do hot fomantation. Paracetamol 250mg od & sos x 5days. Caldikind plus 1tab od x10. Do neck, back & general exercises. It may have to be further investigated. You will need other supportive medicines also. Make sure you are not allergic to any of the medicines you are going to take. If it does not give relief in 1 week contact me again. Do not ignore. It could be beginning of a serious problem.
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I am 38 years old having anger outburst and easily frustrated. Thyroid dosage is on rise, from 25 mg to 75 mg, hypothyroidism.

MBBS, DPM
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
I am 38 years old having anger outburst and easily frustrated. Thyroid dosage is on rise, from 25 mg to 75 mg, hypoth...
Your anger outbursts and frustrations may be due to hypothyroidism itself. Now that you are taking proper dose, it will subside in due course. Keep repeating thyroid function tests 3 monthly and adjust the dose. With normal tsh level if your anger is the same, consult a psychiatrist. Many persons with hypothyroidism suffer from depression also. Both need to be treated side by side.
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Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Delhi
TIP FOR THYROID PROBLEM Take 2 teaspoon of coriander and soak it a cup of water for whole night and in the morning boil and drink empty stomach very effective in thyroid problem.
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If thyroid measures 7.5 is it normal or risk ?

CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology, MBBS
Endocrinologist,
your information is not clear, what are you exactly referring to by saying" thyroid is 7.5" there is no such measure. Please be specific.
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What to do if the blood sugar sometime rise and sometime fall down and the body feel like its not having any energy, what to do?

Practical Course in Diabetology, POST GRADUATE COURSE IN DIABETOLOGY, MBBS
Endocrinologist, Jammu
What to do if the blood sugar sometime rise and sometime fall down and the body feel like its not having any energy, ...
Avoid sugar, junk food, fried food and fruit juices. Exercise regularly for fix time. And take medicine regularly. Take your meals at fix time. That will lead to less fluctuations and take fixed amount of food everyday.
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I am 57 years old and having back ache in muscles for the last so many days due to thyroid problem and lost almost 15 kg weight in one year. Please guide.

MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine Specialist, Faridabad
I am 57 years old and having back ache in muscles for the last so many days due to thyroid problem and lost almost 15...
your are taking med. tab.gemer-1., muscular pain occurs in thyroid...you may take for it..tab. voveran 50 mg sos.
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What's the treatment for diabetic neuropathy in the lower limbs. Is there a way to reverse diabetic neuropathy.

MBBS, CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology
Endocrinologist, Hubli-Dharwad
What's the treatment for diabetic neuropathy in the lower limbs. Is there a way to reverse diabetic neuropathy.
Mr Amod, Diabetic neuropathy occurring in lower limbs can not be reversed, as damage to the nerve endings due hyperglycaemia is permanent. But further deterioration can be prevented by strict blood sugar control, and symptoms of neuropathy can be relieved by using certain drugs. It will be better if you give details like current fasting and PP sugar levels, HbA1c% and drugs being taken with dosage and come in a private conversation then i can give specific suggestions.
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I got diabetes before 1 yr and still my condition is good my pp 97 and fasting 120 so pls give me advise for this.

MBBS
General Physician, Faridabad
I got diabetes before 1 yr and still my condition is good my pp 97 and fasting 120 so pls give me advise for this.
i think it is reverse. this level is with medicine. continue the same treatment. it will help. welcome.
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Hello sir my age 29 and I am pain of TSH give me solution of Tsh matlab mai kay khao aur kay na khaun tell me.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Hello sir my age 29 and I am pain of TSH give me solution of Tsh matlab mai kay khao aur kay na khaun  tell me.
TSh is an indication of thyroid hormone production and will not cause pain and if TSH is low or high you need to take medication as needed
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What are the remedies to be followed for controlling the level of diabetic out of medicine. She is taking medicine daily for the same.

M.Sc - Dietitics / Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist,
What are the remedies to be followed for controlling the level of diabetic out of medicine. She is taking medicine da...
You need to take a diabetic diet. Eat more vegetables and fruits. Eat complex carbohydrate. Eat food frequently. Drink water 4 ltrs. Eat flax seed. Use refined rice bran oil, and sesame oil for cooking. Daily oil intake 15-20 ml. Do exercise 30 min.
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I have a thyroid problem for 1 year what can I do ?

MD - Internal Medicine, MBBS
Endocrinologist,
Drink more water, high-carbohydrate foods such as potatoes, rice, pasta and bread. You can take Nutrient-rich foods that improve your health may also benefit your thyroid gland, antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables more plenty of water: Blueberries, tomatoes, bell peppers, and other foods rich in antioxidants can improve overall health and benefit the thyroid gland. Eating foods high in B vitamins, like whole grains, may also help. Selenium: Tiny amounts of selenium are needed for enzymes that make thyroid hormones to work properly. Eating selenium-rich foods, such as sunflower seeds or Brazil nuts, can be beneficial. Tyrosine: This amino acid is used by the thyroid gland to produce T3 and T4. Taking a supplement may help,
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Being a diabetic patient, how to improve the metabolic structure of body. My flesh all gone. What type of additional food I have to take to improve the metabolism. I want to become slightly fat look.

MBBS
General Physician,
Being a diabetic patient, how to improve the metabolic structure of body. My flesh all gone. What type of additional ...
Being a diabetic pt you should take nutritious food like leafy vegetables, cereals, lean meat pk like chicken, fish, eggs etc go for morning walk followed by free hand exercises with few yoga and pranayum like kapal bhatee. Avoid alcohol and junk food you should maintain your body wt as per bmi.
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Diabetes Diet Modification

BHMS, Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Medicine
Homeopath,
Diabetes Diet Modification
Eating to Prevent, Control and Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes is on the rise, yet most cases are preventable with healthy lifestyle changes. Some can even be reversed. Taking steps to prevent and control diabetes doesn’t mean living in deprivation.

While eating right is important, you don’t have to give up sweets entirely or resign yourself to a lifetime of bland “health food”. With these tips, you can still enjoy your favorite foods and take pleasure from your meals without feeling hungry or deprived.



Taking control of diabetes

Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, there is some good news. You can make a big difference with healthy lifestyle changes.

The most important thing you can do for your health is to lose weight—but you don’t have to lose all your extra pounds to start reaping the benefits. Experts say that losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight within a year can help you lower your blood sugar considerably, as well as lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

It’s not too late to make a positive change, even if you’ve already developed diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you think.
The dangers of "sugar belly"

Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, and processed foods like Vada-Pav, Samosa, Maggi, Biscuit and coffee drinks) are more likely to increase blood sugar level rapidly.

Cutting back on sugary foods can decrease trigger to pancreases for insulin secretion, protects from further damage and ensures body cells insulin receptors functioning.



What you need to know about diabetes and diet

Eating right is vital if you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes. While exercise is also important, what you eat has the biggest impact when it comes to Blood glucose level. But what does eating right for diabetes mean?

You may be surprised to hear that your nutritional needs are virtually the same everyone else: no special foods or complicated diets are necessary.

A diabetes diet is simply a healthy eating plan that is high in nutrients, low in fat, and moderate in calories. It is a healthy diet for anyone! The only difference is that you need to pay more attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat.

Myths and facts about diabetes and diet

MYTH: You must avoid sugar at all costs.

Fact: The good news is that you can enjoy your favorite treats as long as you plan properly. Dessert doesn’t have to be off limits, as long as it’s a part of a healthy meal plan or combined with exercise.


MYTH: A high-protein diet is best.

Fact: Studies have shown that eating too much protein, especially animal protein (Meat), may actually cause insulin resistance, a key factor in diabetes. A healthy diet includes protein, carbohydrates, and fats. Our bodies need all three to function properly. The key is a balanced diet.


MYTH: You have to cut way down on carbs.

Fact: Again, the key is to eat a balanced diet. The serving size and the type of carbohydrates you eat are especially important. Focus on whole grain carbs since they are a good source of fiber and they are digested slowly, keeping blood sugar levels more even.


MYTH: You’ll no longer be able to eat normally. You need special diabetic meals.

Fact: The principles of healthy eating are the same—whether or not you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes. Expensive diabetic foods generally offer no special benefit. You can easily eat with your family and friends if you eat in moderation.
Diabetes and diet tip 1: Choose high-fiber, slow-release carbs

Carbohydrates have a big impact on your blood sugar levels—more so than fats and proteins—but you don’t have to avoid them. You just need to be smart about what types of carbs you eat.

In general, it’s best to limit highly refined carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, and rice, as well as soda, and snack foods. Focus instead on High Fiber carbohydrates—also known as slow-release carbs.

Slow-release carbs help keep blood sugar levels even because they are digested more slowly, thus preventing your body from producing too much insulin. They also provide lasting energy and help you stay full longer.

Choosing carbs that are packed with fiber (and don’t spike your blood sugar)

Instead of… Try these high-fiber options…
1 (White rice) Brown rice or wild rice
2 (White potatoes including fries and mashed potatoes) cauliflower mash
3 (White bread Whole-wheat or whole-grain bread
Idali - Dosa) High-fiber breakfast Chapati
Sandwich Eg and Milk
4 (Cornflakes) Bran flakes
5 (Corn) Peas or leafy greens

Making the glycemic index easy

The glycemic index (GI) tells you how quickly a food turns into sugar in your system. Glycemic load, a newer term, looks at both the glycemic index and the amount of carbohydrate in a food, giving you a more accurate idea of how a food may affect your blood sugar level.

High Carbohydrate foods spike your blood sugar rapidly, while high fiber contents in carbohydrate foods have the least effect.

You can find glycemic index and glycemic load tables online, but you don’t have to rely on food charts in order to make smart choices. Three broad categories: fire, water, and coal. The harder your body needs to work to break food down, the better.

• Fire foods have a high GI, and are low in fiber and protein. They include “white foods” (white rice, white pasta, white bread, potatoes, most baked goods), sweets, chips, and many processed foods. They should be much limited in your diet.

• Water foods are free foods—meaning you can eat as many as you like. They include all vegetables and most types of fruit (fruit juice, dried fruit, and canned fruit packed in syrup spike blood sugar quickly and are not considered water foods).

• Coal foods have a low GI and are high in fiber and protein. They include nuts and seeds, lean meats, seafood, whole grains, and beans. They also include “white food” replacements such as brown rice, whole-wheat bread.



Controlling weight with the glycemic index

Researchers believe that the key to weight control lies in reducing the amount of refined carbohydrates (“white” or “fire” foods) in your diet. Instead, focus on low GI or “coal” foods which keep you feeling fuller much longer.

Low-glycemic foods take longer to digest so sugar is absorbed more slowly into the bloodstream. As a result you’re less likely to experience a spike in your blood sugar level, you’ll remain sated for longer, and are less likely to overeat.


• Avoid processed foods like baked goods, sugary desserts, and packaged cereal and opt instead for steel cut oats, beans, dark green leafy vegetables, and whole grains.


• Eat whole fresh fruit instead of fruit juice—squeezing fruit releases more sugar so a whole orange has a lower GI than a glass of juice.
8 principles of low-glycemic eating

1. Eat a lot of non-starchy vegetables, beans, and fruits such as apples, pears, peaches, and berries. Even tropical fruits like bananas and papayas tend to have a lower glycemic index than typical desserts.

2. Eat grains in the least-processed state possible: “unbroken,” such as brown rice, and whole barley, millet, and wheat berries; or traditionally processed, such as stone-ground bread, natural granola or muesli breakfast cereals.

3. Limit white potatoes and refined grain products

4. Limit concentrated sweets—including high-calorie foods with a low glycemic index, such as ice cream. Eliminate sugar-sweetened drinks.

5. Eat a healthful type of protein at most meals, such as beans, fish.

6. Choose foods with healthful fats, such as olive oil, nuts (almonds, walnuts). Limit saturated fats from dairy and other animal products. Completely eliminate partially hydrogenated fats (trans fats), which are in fast food and many packaged foods.

7. Don’t skip breakfast.

8. Eat slowly and stop when full.
Adapted from Ending the Food Fight, by David Ludwig with Suzanne Rostler (Houghton Mifflin, 2008).
Diabetes and diet tip 2: Be smart about sweets



Eating for diabetes doesn’t mean eliminating sugar. If you have diabetes, you can still enjoy a small serving of your favorite dessert now and then. The key is moderation.



How to include sweets in a diabetes-friendly diet

• bread or rice: Eating sweets at a meal adds extra carbohydrates. Because of this it is best to cut back on the other carb-containing foods at the same meal.

• Add some healthy fat to your diet: It may seem counterintuitive to pass over the low-fat or fat-free desserts in favor of their higher-fat counterparts. But fat slows down the digestive process, meaning blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly. That doesn’t mean, however, that you should reach for the Snacks as Vada-Pav, Samoosa. Think healthy fats, such as carrot, cuccumber, cheese, yogurt, or some nuts.

• When you eat Sweet How many times have you mindlessly eaten your way through a bag of cookies or a huge piece of cake. Can you really say that you enjoyed each bite? Make your indulgence count by eating slowly and paying attention to the flavors and textures. You’ll enjoy it more, plus you’re less likely to overeat.
Tricks for cutting down on sugar

• Reduce how much soft drinks, soda and juice you drink. A recent study found that for each 12 oz. serving of a sugar-sweetened beverage you drink a day, your risk for diabetes increases by about 15 percent. If you miss your carbonation kick, try shelf sparkling water with a twist of lemon or lime or a splash of fruit juice. Reduce the amount of creamers and sweeteners you add to tea and coffee drinks.

• Sweeten foods yourself. Buy unsweetened iced tea, plain yogurt, or unflavored oatmeal, for example, and add sweetener (or fruit) yourself. You’re likely to add far less sugar than the manufacturer would have.

• Reduce the amount of sugar in recipes by ¼ to ⅓. If a recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, for example, use ⅔ or ¾ cup instead.

• Find healthy ways to satisfy your sweet tooth. Instead of ice cream, blend up frozen bananas for a creamy, frozen treat. Or enjoy a small chunk of dark chocolate, rather than your usual milk chocolate bar.

• Start with half of the dessert you normally eat, and replace the other half with fruit.
Diabetes and your diet tip 3: Choose fats wisely



(Fats can be either helpful or harmful in your diet. People with diabetes are at higher risk for heart disease, so it is even more important to be smart. Some fats are unhealthy and others have enormous health benefits. But all fats are high in calories, so you should always watch your portion sizes.)

• Unhealthy fats – The two most damaging fats are saturated fats and trans fats. Saturated fats are found mainly in animal products such as red meat and whole milk dairy products. Trans fats, also called partially hydrogenated oils, are created by adding hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid and less likely to spoil—which is very good for food manufacturers, and very bad for you.


• Healthy fats – The best fats are unsaturated fats, which come from plant and fish sources and are liquid at room temperature. Primary sources include olive oil, Soyabean oil, Sunflower oil. Also focus on omega-3 fatty acids (Fish Cod. Liver oil Tablets), which fight inflammation and support brain and heart health.




Ways to reduce unhealthy fats and add healthy fats:

• Cook with olive/Soyabean/Sunflower oil instead of butter or vegetable oil.

• Trim any visible fat off of meat before cooking and remove the skin before cooking chicken.

• Instead of chips or crackers, try snacking on nutsor seeds.

• Instead of frying, choose to grill, boil, bake, or stir-fry.

• Serve fish 2 or 3 times week instead of red meat.

• Add cuccumber, Carrot, curd to your sandwiches instead of cheese. This will keep the creamy texture, but improve the health factor.




Diabetes and diet tip 4: Eat regularly and keep a food diary

If you’re overweight, you may be encouraged to note that you only have to lose 7% of your body weight to cut your risk of diabetes in half. And you don’t have to obsessively count calories or starve yourself to do it.

When it comes to successful weight loss, research shows that the two most helpful strategies involve following a regular eating schedule and recording what you eat.




Eat at regularly set times

Your body is better able to regulate blood sugar levels—and your weight—when you maintain a regular meal schedule. Aim for moderate and consistent portion sizes for each meal or snack.

• Don’t skip breakfast. Start your day off with a good breakfast. Eating breakfast every day will help you have energy as well as steady blood sugar levels.

• Eat regular small meals—up to 6 per day. People tend to eat larger portions when they are overly hungry, so eating regularly will help you keep your portions in check.

• Keep calorie intake the same. Regulating the amount of calories you eat on a day-to-day basis has an impact on the regularity of your blood sugar levels. Try to eat roughly the same amount of calories every day, rather than overeating one day or at one meal, and then skimping on the next.




Keep a food diary

Research shows that people who keep a food diary are more likely to lose weight and keep it off. In fact, a recent study found that people who kept a food diary lost twice as much weight as those who didn’t.

Why does writing down what you eat and drink help you drop pounds? For one, it helps you identify problem areas—such as your afternoon snack or your morning Breakfast—where you’re getting a lot more calories than you realized. It also increases your awareness of what, why, and how much you’re eating, which helps you cut back on mindless snacking and emotional eating.




What about exercise?

When it comes to preventing, controlling, or reversing diabetes, you can’t afford to overlook exercise can help your weight loss efforts, and is especially important in maintaining weight loss.


There is also evidence that regular exercise can improve your insulin sensitivity even if you don’t lose weight.

You don’t have to become a gym rat or adopt a grueling fitness regimen. One of the easiest ways is to start walking for 30 minutes five or more times a week. You can also try swimming, biking, or any other moderate-intensity activities—meaning you work up a light sweat and start to breathe harder. Even house and yard work counts.



More help for diabetes
Next step...


Learn how to lose weight and keep it off. If your last diet attempt wasn't a success, or life events have caused you to gain weight, don’t be discouraged. The key is to find a plan that works with your body’s individual needs so that you can avoid common diet pitfalls and find long-term, weight loss success.




Diabetes-friendly foods


Carbohydrates – Covers the three main types of carbs: sugars, starches, and fiber. Includes information on making smart carb choices. (American Diabetes Association www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/carbohydrates.html)


Carbohydrates and Diabetes – Explore a collection of simple tips on managing your consumption of carbohydrates. (UCSF Medical Center www.ucsfhealth.org/education/carbohydrates_and_diabetes/index.html).


Fruits – Many people mistakenly assume that fruits aren’t a part of a diabetes-friendly diet. But fruits, like vegetables, are loaded with nutrients and fiber. Learn

how to include them in your diabetes diet. (American

Diabetes Association www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/fruits.html)


Fat and Diabetes – Information on the different kinds of fats, as well as what foods they are in. (American Diabetes Association www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/fat-and-diabetes.html)

92 people found this helpful

I am diabetic patient so what shall I eat on regular interval so that I can control my diabetes.

MBBS
General Physician, Cuttack
I am diabetic patient so what shall I eat on regular interval so that I can control my diabetes.
Avoid sweets,high calorie and carbohydrate rich diet. Adhere to a diabetic diet after consulting dietician.Go for regular exercise,reduce your weight if you are diabetic.Monitor your blood sugar three monthy and consult diabetologist for advice and treatment
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Hi Today my pp was 54. What to do?

Certified Diabetes Educator, Registered Dietitian (RD), PGDD, Bachelor of Unani Medicine and Surgery (B.U.M.S), General Physician
Dietitian/Nutritionist,
I am a registered dietitian, certified diabetes educator and a doctor who will help you in your diabetes problem. You need to provide me your daily food intake details. There are many lifestyle and dietary guidelines that can be followed: take high fiber prescribed diet. Maintain a healthy body weight eat a balanced diet as prescribed by a registered dietitian, I being a registered dietitian and doctor have been successfully helping patients with their diabetes problem. I will also prescribe medicines that will speed up the time to achieve your weight management goals. Do reply back for private consultation.
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My father is 60 years old. He has heart problem and sugar but both are maintained with proper medication. But from last month their appetite is reducing day by day from 4 roti to 1-2.He keep saying that I am not hungry I do not know why? Their body also started looking thin and weak. Please help I am very worried about him.

MBBS, CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology
Endocrinologist, Hubli-Dharwad
My father is 60 years old. He has heart problem and sugar but both are maintained with proper medication. But from la...
Mr. Lybrate-user, you have not mentioned his height and weight to find out what is his bmi. Plus it would have been better if you had mentioned his blood glucose (fbs< pp & hba1c%) and bp readings. If a person is of 60 plus, then eating 1 to 2 roti per meal is absolutely fine, unless a person does strenuous exercise or excess physical activity. Sometimes if bllod glucose is not in proper control there is a possibility of the person feeling hungry all the while. Ideally when in control fbs -should be ccloser to 100 mg, pp between 150 to 160 mg hba1c%<7. And bp 130/30 mm hg. So please come back with those details. Thanks.
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Sir I am a 23 year old girl. I have the problem of hyperthyroidism and I am taking thyronom 100mg. Is there any solution for this problem. Will it be cure?

DNB (Endocrinology), MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Endocrinologist, Ludhiana
your cousin is having hypothyroidism. Most cases are due to autoimmune disease which means life long treatment has to be taken. But it doesn't cause a problem if she is regularly taking medicine. Instead she should be more worried for type 1 diabetes as you have mentioned in conditions.
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How i can get rid of type 2 diebetis

Vaidya Visharad
Ayurveda,
Hello, Dear, for Diabetic the best Ayurvedic medicine is there, but let me know the Blood report ie Sugar,fasting, PP, HbA1c.
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PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
People with diabetes should be particularly cautious when it comes to drinking alcohol because alcohol can make some of the complications of diabetes worse. For starters, alcohol impacts the liver in doing its job of regulating blood sugar. Alcohol can also interact with some medications that are prescribed to people with diabetes. Even if you only rarely drink alcohol, talk with your healthcare provider about it so that he or she knows which medications are best for you.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Alcohol interacts with diabetes medications.

Alcohol can cause blood glucose levels to rise or fall, depending on how much you drink. Some diabetes pills (including sulfonylureas and meglitinides) also lower blood glucose levels by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin. Combining the blood-sugar-lowering effects of the medication with alcohol can lead to hypoglycemia or “insulin shock,” which is a medical emergency. 

2. Alcohol prevents your liver from doing its job.

When you drink alcohol, your liver has to work to remove it from your blood instead of working to regulate blood sugar. For this reason, you should never drink alcohol when your blood glucose is already low.

3. Never drink alcohol on an empty stomach.

Food slows down the rate at which alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream. The Diabetes Teaching Center at the University of California in San Francisco recommends eating a meal or snack containing carbohydrates when you drink alcohol. 

4. Always test blood sugar before having an alcoholic beverage.

Alcohol impairs your liver’s ability to produce glucose, so be sure to know your blood glucose number before you drink an alcoholic beverage.

5. Alcohol can cause hypoglycemia.

Within a few minutes of drinking alcohol, and for up to 12 hours afterward, alcohol can cause your blood glucose level to drop. After consuming alcohol, always check your blood glucose level to make sure it is in the safe zone. If your blood glucose is below 100 mg/dL, eat a snack to bring it up.

6. You can save your life by drinking slowly.

If you weigh 150 pounds, it takes about two hours for your liver to break down one alcoholic beverage.

Drinking too much alcohol can make you feel dizzy, sleepy, and disoriented—the same symptoms as hypoglycemia. Be sure to wear a bracelet that alerts people around you to the fact that you have diabetes, so that if you start to behave like you are intoxicated they know that your symptoms could be caused by hypoglycemia. If you are hypoglycemic, you need food and/or glucose tablets to raise your blood glucose level.

7. You can save your life by knowing your limit.

Your healthcare provider will tell you how much alcohol is safe for you to drink. Depending on your health condition, that may mean no alcohol at all. In some cases women with diabetes may have no more than one alcoholic beverage a day. Men should have no more than two.

26 people found this helpful

Diabetes, Hypothyroidism and obesity are more common in women than in men. True/False.

MBBS, CCEBDM, Diploma in Diabetology
Endocrinologist, Hubli-Dharwad
Diabetes, Hypothyroidism and obesity are more common in women than in men. True/False.
Mr Zishan, Only hypothyroidism is more common in women compared to men. The other two conditions are more in men.
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