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Dr. Samuel Ninan

BVSC & AH

Veterinarian, Bangalore

52 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
Dr. Samuel Ninan BVSC & AH Veterinarian, Bangalore
52 Years Experience  ·  200 at clinic
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Personal Statement

My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well....more
My experience is coupled with genuine concern for my patients. All of my staff is dedicated to your comfort and prompt attention as well.
More about Dr. Samuel Ninan
Dr. Samuel Ninan is an experienced Veterinarian in Kaggadasapura, Bangalore. He has been a successful Veterinarian for the last 52 years. He has done BVSC & AH . You can consult Dr. Samuel Ninan at Sonia Veterinary Hospital in Kaggadasapura, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Samuel Ninan on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 36 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVSC & AH - Gauhati veterinary College, - 1965
Languages spoken
English

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House No. 30, New Tippasandra Post, 3rd Cross, Kaggadasapura Main Road, CV Raman Nagar, Landmark: Near HDFC BankBangalore Get Directions
200 at clinic
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RESPECTED SIR, MY DOG NAME IS "TIGER" BRED IS LABRADOR, I HAVE ONLY ONE PROBLEM FOR MY DOG. SKIN PROBLEM ,

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, what type of skin problem ? hair loss / dandruff / scratching all the time? deworm first, give wokazole dip once in a week and support with good diet.
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I have a Pekingese dog.10 years old.Just unable to get rid of ticks inspite of using various repellants like fipronil spray, advantage, advantix etc. Kindly suggest a way out please

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Advantix is one of best methods for ticks control. Don't give bath to your dog atleast for 15 days after application. Advantix is effective for one month. Do you have any other dog in you house? Do you have open area at your house?
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How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
TAKING CARE OF PETS

Dog hygiene
Risk of transmission from contact with dogs is low and may be further reduced by simple precautions.
Dogs should be seen by a veterinarian on a regular basis.
Dogs should be treated promptly for diarrhea.
Dogs should be vaccinated for rabies.
Dogs should be treated to prevent heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis).
Effective flea control requires treatment of affected dogs, their environment, and other animals they contact.
Dogs should be fed high quality commercial food.
Dogs should not eat raw meat or eggs. Raw meat may have higher rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella in their stools
Dogs should not be allowed to eat garbage, feces, or hunt.
Dogs should not be allowed to drink non-potable water (e.G, surface water or toilet water).
Dogs should be inspected for ticks regularly.
Dog owners should wash their hands following contact with or cleaning up dog feces.
Groups at high risk for serious infection from pets include: Persons with waning immunity (e.G, older adults); children less than five years old; pregnant women and immunocompromised patients with AIDS, those without a functioning spleen or taking immunosuppressive therapy
To avoid infections, people at higher risk should take particular precautions with any animal contact.
They should do thorough and frequent hand wash
They should avoid contact with animals and their environment (e.G, pens, bedding and manure).
HIV positive patients should carry following precautions
When obtaining a new pet, they should avoid animals aged 6 months (or 1 year for cats)
They should be cautious when obtaining a pet from pet-breeding facilities, pet stores, and animal shelters, because of highly variable hygienic and sanitary conditions.
They should avoid stray animals.
They should avoid contact with any animal that has diarrhea.
They should seek veterinary care for animals with diarrheal illness, and a fecal sample from such animals should be examined for Cryptosporidium, Salmonella and Campylobacter.
They should wash their hands after handling pets, including before eating, and should avoid contact with pets' feces.
They should avoid contact with reptiles (e.G, snakes, lizards, iguanas, and turtles) as well as chicks and ducklings because of the risk for salmonellosis.
They should wear gloves during aquarium cleaning to reduce the risk for infection with Mycobacterium marinum.
They should avoid contact with exotic pets (e.G, nonhuman primates).
3 people found this helpful

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Preventive Health care: As pets age faster than humans, a year is a long time in a dog's life. We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden.
It is recommended that every pet should receive a general health evaluation once in 6 months. A preventive health visit should cover following aspects:
• Vaccination status
• Parasite control for intestinal parasites, ear mites, ticks and fleas.
• Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odours, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
• Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
• Exercise - how much exercise your dog receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your dog's ability to exercise
• Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
• Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
• Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
• Behaviour – any behaviour problems such as barking, changes in temperament, any obsessive behaviour, urinary accidents
• Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
• Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
• Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, Neutering - if it has not already been performed
• Blood tests – especially for geriatric dogs, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
6 people found this helpful

Question specifically for a veterinarian but open to all. Post exposure rabies vaccination in injured pet cat, bitten by unknown animal (probably by stray dog), with visible bite mark injuries on back, resulting in paralysis of the the rear section of the cat (hind legs dragging) due to fracture of the spinal chord. My cat (female, 4 years) old was bitten on April 14th 2016 by an unknown animal (the vet in my place India suspected it to be a dog). She was pregnant at the time of injury. The cat was vaccinated (rabies vaccine CANVAC® R) given in last January and February 2015, I took the cat in a jute sack to the veterinarian and his assistant ,however, injected the vaccines both the times through the sack, however he said to me that he was sure that the vaccines were injected successfully. The cat however missed the scheduled anti rabies booster dose in Feb 2016. Actually the cat it belonged to my aunt residing near my house but somehow she came to our place, however at night she always stay outside like a free roaming cat. Two months back (possibly nite of April 14th 2016) the injury took place and we found her in our garage dragging her hind limbs, the doctor (veterinarian ) confirmed it to be bite injury causing damage in her spinal column, she initially could not urinate on her own, her bladder has to be evacuated with catheter every alternate day for a month. She underwent cesarean on May 5th and two kitten survived, kitten are healthy. After the injury she was given post exposure prophylaxis 5 doses of Nobivac® Rabies on 0,3,7,14 and 28th starting from April 15th to May 13th (however the 7th and 14th dose delayed by 1 and 5 days due to urine infection and fever. Is this post exposure vaccination effective? The vet in my place performed an xray on May 16th and plain xray revealed irreparable spinal chord fracture (probably the teeth of the biting stray dog went inside the spinal chord). Other than unable to urinate on her own sometimes and the rear leg paralysis, the cat looks fine, will the post exposure rabies vaccine work, is there any chance of her developing rabies in the future? In my place, there is no vet center where we can quarantine her for 6 months , so we have kept her home? It will be almost 3 months after the injury and she has not show any signs of rabies, she is eating fine and behaving normally , other than unable to walk due to hind leg paralysis cause of the spinal chord injury. Somewhere I read in the internet that "--post exposure prophylaxis should not be given on injured cats cause it mask symptoms of infection (like rabies) in cats. The documented rabies quarantine time is 6 months. There is a chance that any pet bitten by an unknown animal can develop rabies as we cannot affirm that the attacker did not have rabies--" But the veterinarian in my place gave the post exposure rabies injection, is this correct? Is there any chance of developing rabies in my cat in the future? Me and my family are taking care of the cat in the best possible way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Rabies can cause only and only by an infected mammal only to any mammal walking the earth. Infected mammals like a dog, may show typical signs of rabies (mad dog with ropy saliva from the jaws and red eyes), so easily identified a d isolated by fellow pack mates and humans. Rabies vaccination protects (doesn't mask the signs) a mammal like a cat or a dog or a human, from being infected by rabies when bitten by a rabid animal. Symptoms of rabies can be seen within a week to 10 days from the day of bite. Extra dosages of a rabies vaccine would not coz any harm as such except mild fever or local pain at the site of injection for a day or two. Your family is safe in handling the cat as it is not showing any such sign of the rabies infection so far. Rabies is transmitted only when your blood will come in contact with the saliva of an infected animal.
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My dog is vomiting water like liquid little foamy with tiny bits of blood, it happened twice, one 5 days back in the morning around 4am, then at 2am. During vomiting he collapsed and paralyzed without any movement. Both time he woke up after 5 mins and he was active. I gave him rantac and vomited (half). Please help me, I am scared, he is 12 years old. 6 months back he had UTI. He is being given Nefrotec DS 1 tabs a day from 4 months as Advised by Vet. Please Please Help me, save my boy.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Due to her kidney problems, seems her heart is suffering a bit. Toxins r slowly raising to the brain. You have to get your dog to your nearby vet Dr. For daily blood tests and iv fluid therapies with proper antibiotics if any sign of infection is confirmed by the blood reports.
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What is the right age for a dog collar for my german shephard? he is 2 months old can I put him in leash? suggest whether it is harmful or not?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
I prefer not before 4 months, u can have weight less choke or fancy collar just to have a hold on him but cant tie until 4 months of age.
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Hi, I have a six year old yellow labrador. Her underbelly is turning black and the discoloration has reached up to her neck. What could be the reason? also she has developed bad breath recently!

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
She had skin problem. Kindly share some pic. So that I can guide you. Blackening of skin mainly because of chronic infection.
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I am 30 years old female. I have pet cat in home. I want to know is there any blood test that can detect if I have any infection in my blood or body from cats? Please advise.

MBA (Healthcare), MVSc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Bidar
Hello. You need not worry about infection from your pet unless you have had it vaccinated and you are active and healthy. There are certain blood tests which are indicative of infection, but only done is risky patients. For more details consult me.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.
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Please Suggest something for my 2.5 months old german shepherd for a shiny coat. Its coat is dull and rough although I brush it regularly and feed him non veg and roti with curd. Please. Suggest some home made food not pedigree or market items if possible.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please give him fish oil and also possible food of hills science plan large breed puppy food all the time as per the standards. With dog food you cant acheive these things as they require 20 times more protien than human as the growth rate of dog is higer they attain weight of 30-40 kg in just 12 months were as human it takes more years normally (diet contains what we need) and 10 times more fat and 15 times vitamins and omega fatty acids for hairy breeds. Its then upto you to change you r mind set in feeding your pet.
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My street dog pup is 1 month old .not having any feed from yesterday morning. And is crying having cramps need medical help .pls suggest me medicine or any injection my sis is mbbs and she can inject the pup maybe.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Streat dog means uncared one & will have infection both microbial as ell as parasitic or even hepatitis, it is better to exam stools for worm infection, Assuming, the mixed infection, you may give, Antibacterial, antifungal & anthelmintics, After this, you give Live tonic, with B, Complex, oral feeding woth suplements. With Milk, Egg, Raagi gruel it will be allright. If Temp, is noiticed small amount of paracetamol say 50 mg will take care. Do this it will be allright.
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My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
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Hi, I have a two-year old male cocker spaniel named Zorro. He starts barking whenever he says a stranger on the road be it kids or others or even other dogs. But he absolutely loves the people he knows apart from his family. Since we stay in an apartment I've been trying to figure out what could be done to make him a lil friendly towards people that will calm him down when I walk him daily. He doesn't try to bitw or anything, just barks non-stop. Kindly give me some insight on this. Thanks.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
In security and non belief of the strangers .This is good as far as concern cocker spaniel . If he is friendly too all they can give him a treat and can steal from you . If wanna stop barking continuously just train the dog . Only way to do it
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I have a parrot, its feathers are of red color. Bt it is unable to speak. What should I give this parrot to eat so that it start speaking.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
Parrots start speaking with training. The training should begin with small words like hi hello wah etc the training session should not be of more than 15 to 20 minutes in a row followed by giving gifts to the pet.
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I have a pair of american eskimos . But my male one is still not able to climb on bed by himself. My both dog n bitch are of same size.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
What is the age of your dog, what is the height of the bed you are expecting to climb? is the bitch able to climb. Clarify . If the dogs are active enough don't worry, train them to climb
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My dog just bite me but he's fully vaccines! Should I do anything or anything will happen?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
As long as your pet has received yearly rabies vaccines and he is disease free - nothing should happen to you. Its however wise to show your bite wound to a human physician and take his opinion. Take care.
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Hi. I'm 4 months pregnant. I have 2 in and out kittens who at 10 months old. I never clean their litter. Do I still need to give them up?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Are the kittens vaccinated and dewormed? since they are in and out - wise to get them checked for toxoplasmosis. Please speak to your gynac as well regarding the tests for you. Its wise to be safe.Take care.
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My cat just laid two kittens two weeks ago. When should we take her for spaying? She is two years old. This her second delivery.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hello, Usually cats come into heat sooner than dogs. You can wait untill your cat is feeding milk to the kitten which usually goes like for 35- 42 days. This will hel kitten to get sufficient motherz milk. And then sperate the kitten from mom. This will help drying of the uterus of the mother. Wait for another 10 days. N get her operated (spayed) on the 11th day.
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